What It’s Like To Live With Tuberculosis In The United States

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  • By Lauren Weber The Morning Email Editor, The Huffington Post

In August 2014, Kate O’Brien, a 34-year-old media producer from Brooklyn, found out she was expecting her second child.

She was ecstatic. But this pregnancy didn’t proceed like the first. For the next few months, O’Brien had a cold she couldn’t shake. She woke up in the middle of the night drenched in sweat. She wanted to blame it on her pregnancy, yet she kept losing weight.

She could barely eat. She coughed up balls of bloody mucus. Her throat burned. None of her doctors could figure out what was wrong.

A physician sent her to Mount Sinai West Hospital in Manhattan in January 2015, when, at five months pregnant, she still couldn’t gain any weight.

“No one likes a skinny pregnant lady,” she said.

O’Brien expected to stay at the hospital overnight. She didn’t get a chance to say goodbye to her 2-year-old, Donny, but she figured she’d be home soon.

She didn’t walk out of the hospital for 75 days.

The doctors at Mount Sinai diagnosed O’Brien with infectious tuberculosis. After a few days in the intensive care unit, she was shifted to a negative-pressure isolation room, which helps contain the infected air. Signs announcing “WARNING: Infectious Disease” were affixed to the room’s airtight set of double doors. And all O’Brien could think about was what this meant for her unborn baby.

The federal policy that governs medical isolation and quarantine in the U.S. applies to just a handful of diseases. Most of them, such as cholera, smallpox and the plague, are vanishingly rare in the U.S. But tuberculosis is not. In 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded 9,563 new cases of TB.

That same year, for the first time since 1992, the number of tuberculosis cases in the U.S. rose, according to the CDC. Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia reported more cases in 2015 than they did in 2014. The per-capita rate of tuberculosis cases has plateaued at three infections per 100,000 people.

Read more: http://goo.gl/wSPDl4

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Spreading the Zika Virus: Is It Bio-warfare?

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Why should America biologically prepare a disease to destroy and cause pain to others?
                  By Stephen Lendman

The Zika virus is related to dengue fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and West Nile viruses.

So far, drugs aren’t effective against it. A vaccine if developed will do more harm than good. Most infected individuals suffer mild illness, called Zika disease.

Potentially deadly Guillain-Barre syndrome at times occurs. Fetuses are at risk for microcephaly, an abnormally small head in relation to the rest of the body and underdeveloped brain, permanent damage.

Zika has been around for decades, occasional outbreaks occurring in Africa and Asia – currently in Central and South America, Brazil its epicenter.

It’s being spread by genetically engineered mosquitos. Is it the latest example of US biowarfare? America’s sordid history suggests it.

In 1931, Dr. Cornelius Rhoads infected human subjects with cancer cells – under the auspices of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Investigations. He later conducted radiation exposure experiments on American soldiers and civilian hospital patients.

In 1932, the Tuskegee Syphilis Study infected 200 unwitting Black men, using them as human guinea pigs, denying them treatment, following the progression of their disease, deliberately letting them suffer and die.

In 1940, 400 Chicago prisoners were infected with malaria to study the effects of new and experimental drugs.

At least since the 1940s, America had an active biological warfare program, using controversial methods to test bio-weapons.

VA hospital patients have been used as human guinea pigs for medical experiments. Biological agents were released in US cities (including New York and San Francisco) to test the effects of germ warfare.

America’s deplorable history at home and abroad includes numerous other examples. Washington uses biological, chemical, radiological and other banned weapons in all its wars.

Are US-unleashed genetically modified mosquitos being used to wage biological warfare in Central and South America?

The Zika virus outbreak is linked to GM mosquitoes released in field trials funded by Bill Gates.

The corporate-controlled World Health Organization (WHO) said Zika “is now spreading explosively” in the Americas, hyping an estimated three to four million people at risk over the next year.

Central and South American nations urged women to avoid pregnancy for at least two years. Is Zika being used as an attempted population control scheme?

GM mosquitoes allegedly released to keep dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunga (a crippling mosquito-borne virus) and zika from spreading are facilitating its outbreaks in numerous Central and South American countries – notably Brazil and Colombia.

The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) warned of potential small Zika outbreaks in southern Florida and Texas.

UK biotech company Oxford Insect Technologies developed GM mosquitoes with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funding – a profit-making enterprise, masquerading as a charitable one.

One critic called its operations “vulture philanthropy,” investing in companies causing health problems they claim to be combatting.

Not coincidentally, Zika’s outbreak occurred where GM mosquitoes were released last year in Brazil, now affecting about 20 Central and South American countries.

Maybe areas in southern US states will follow. What’s happening has the earmarks of state-sponsored bio-warfare.

                     Author Stephen Lendman
Lendman
Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago. He can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.
                  His new book as editor and contributor is titled “Flashpoint in Ukraine: US Drive for Hegemony Risks WW III.”
Visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com. 
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