Journalist Frankie Asare-Donkoh’s Wisdom Of The Ancient

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In the early nineties, when writing as a freelance journalist to some newspapers, including ‘Daily Graphic’ in Accra, certain journalists helped me to develop and acquired the skills in writing. Apart George Sydney Abugri and K.B. Asante, Frankie Asare-Donkoh played a significant role in my life as an aspiring writer.

I read many of the afore-mentioned writers’ articles and used their expertise to boost my style of writing, which turned out to be very good for me. Daily Graphic never rejects any article I submit. Sometimes, ‘Ghanaian Times’ will use the same article and change the title.

What makes Frankie’s articles more interesting is the way he articulates and combines his humorous writings. In my recent visit to Cape Coast, I posted a picture on Facebook and immediately heard Frankie’s voice. His comments reminded me of the good old days in Ghana, when contributing regularly to the features, while he writes a column ‘Frankly Speaking’ in Daily Graphic.

Frankie said “Dasssright – see the real Fantes (Ghanaians from Central and Western regions of Ghana) and their usual ‘abrofodzin. (White matters)  In my days at Graphic we usually teased our senior colleague Llyod Evans as being part of the remnants of European Imperialists immorality, and he would usually stop whatever he was doing and chase whoever said it. And here Uncle Savage, Uncle Smith, and Uncle Ephraim bring me those newsroom memories.”

“But one thing is certain: the coastal Fantes no doubt still lead the country when it comes to real ‘brofo’ (English) and it’s not surprisingly Uncle Savage from his Belgium base continuously and savagely takes on the Europeans any time they try to humiliate Africans. Kudos, my brother, you didn’t only inherit the European name, but also the language with which you tell them what others are not able to.”

While in Britain, Mr. Asare-Donkoh also worked on one of my books. I give my thanks to him and all the journalists that partially and wholly helped to shape my career as a writer. I have really enjoyed my profession without regrets.

Frankie Asare-Donkoh’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/fasado

Read ‘The Daily Graphic online.’: http://graphic.com.gh/

Humour: The Man With A Sad Face

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The man with a sad face

Sometimes before a baby is born, his or her parents had already suggested suitable names for the child. Names are influenced by our popular culture, tradition and heroes. Many people bear Biblical names, others not. As a Ghanaian from the Fantse tribe, my traditional name is Ato or Kwamena, because I was born on Saturday.

Names mean a lot but it’s not everyone who knows someone’s name. That’s the reason we often hear “Please what’s your name?” You may know someone because you’ve seen the person a couple of times, but may not know his or her name. I am one of them. In the neighbourhood where I grew up in Africa, few knew me but don’t know my name.

One day someone I know came looking for me in the neighbourhood where I lived. That was his first attempt to visit me. He mentioned my name, yet no one could help him. One Good Samaritan tried his best to help him. “Can you please describe the man you are looking for,” he asked the stranger. “He is a man with dark complexion, about 5 feet 10 inches tall, whose face looks like someone crying.”

“May be I know him, because there is a man who lives close to the beach, whose face really looks like someone crying, maybe it’s him,” said the Good Samaritan.

“Can we go to see if he is the one,” said the stranger. I was at home when I heard a knock on the door, as soon as I opened, stands Ben, my cousin who lives in the Western Region of Ghana. He narrates the funny description which led to my discovery.

“What, do my face looks like someone crying?” I asked.

“If your face doesn’t look like someone crying, how can this Good Samaritan realize that to come home with me? Ben asked.

This is not a matter of anger but laughter. I laughed so hard that my stomach ached, the fact that Ben has never told me this before. After Ben’s visit, I thought about this for a very long time and decided to get rid of this funny and humourous description about me.

By then I’ve heard of the book called ‘The Power of Positive Thinking” by Norman Vincent Pearle. I contacted a friend who had more books than me and borrowed Norman’s book from him. It was a very thick book but inspiring. “Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy.” – Norman Vincent Pearle.

I did really enjoyed reading this interesting book. In fact, I have no words to describe how the book miraculously transformed my life, to get rid of that hidden facial expression which I have lived with for years without my knowledge. Well, it may be that my face still looks like someone crying, because of too much trouble in this world.