Fresh Outbreak Of Ebola In Guinea

NEW EBOLA

Health workers are rushing to the site of a fresh Ebola outbreak in Guinea to bolster efforts to contain the virus and prepare for the likelihood of more cases, aid agencies said on Friday.

Four people in the southern region of Nzerekore were tested on Thursday and two of them were found to have Ebola. They were all from Korokpara, a village where three people from the same family have died in recent weeks from diarrhea and vomiting.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and aid agencies have sent experts to investigate the origin of the new cases and to identify, isolate, vaccinate and monitor all of their contacts.

The Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA) has reopened its Ebola treatment unit in Nzerekore, while the United Nations children’s agency (UNICEF) is reinforcing its team in the region and providing protective equipment and medicine.

“There has been a very professional and experienced response across the board,” said Augustin Augier of ALIMA, which admitted the two patients, a child and his mother, to its treatment unit.

“We are doing all we can to be ready to receive more cases,” he said, adding that ALIMA were flying in more staff from Paris.

More than 28,500 people have been infected and 11,300 have died since the world’s worst recorded Ebola epidemic began in December 2013 – mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

While the epidemic has come under control, experts have warned of the risk of new flare-ups, as Ebola can linger in the eyes, central nervous system and bodily fluids of survivors.

The two fresh cases in Nzerekore, where the Ebola outbreak began in 2013, were reported just hours after the WHO declared neighboring Sierra Leone’s latest flare-up over.

Guinea had been nearing the end of a 90-day period of heightened surveillance when the fresh cases were reported – the country’s first known re-emergence of Ebola after the outbreak was officially declared over there at the end of December 2015.

“The heightened surveillance means mechanisms were in place and that we were vigilant and prepared to deal with the flare-up,” said Guy Yogo, UNICEF’s deputy representative in Guinea.

“The population is now aware of the disease and listening to the guidance it receives from the authorities,” Yogo added.

It was not immediately clear how the villagers from Korokpara had contracted Ebola but the area had resisted efforts to fight the disease in the initial epidemic.

(Reporting By Kieran Guilbert, Editing by Ros Russell; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org)

HOW EBOLA KILLS 

The question the world needs an answer: If Aids and Ebola are not bio-weapons against Africa, why the disease keeps emerging after the World Health Organization and Center for Diseases Control declared Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone Ebola free countries?

“You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.” – Abraham Lincoln.

A Historical Look At The First Report of Lassa, An Ebola like Virus As Biological Warfare Product Against Africa

Lassa 5

By Johan van Dongen and Joel Savage

Lassa fever, an arena-virus, is an acute viral illness that typically occurs in blacks in West Africa. But why? The illness was discovered in 1969 when two missionary nurses died in Nigeria, according to the Center for Diseases Control. But again why? How trustworthy is the CDC?

Lassa fever or Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF) is an acute viral hemorhagic fever caused by the Lassa virus and first described in 1969 in the town of Lassa, in Borno State, Nigeria. Lassa fever is a member of the Arenaviridae virusfamily. Similar to Ebola clinical cases of the disease had been known for over a decade but had not been connected with a viral pathogen. The infection is endemic in West African countries, resulting in 300,000 -500,000 cases annually, causing approximately 5,000 deaths each year. Outbreaks of the disease have been observed in Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra leone, Guinea and the Central African Republic.

History of Lassa Fever

There are seven exotic diseases of concern. Three of these, the most unpredictable are Lassa fever, Marburg-virus and Ebola virus diseases. In this article the epidemiologic and bio-warfare aspects of these diseases are discussed, with particular emphasis on exportation from their indigenous areas in Africa and on the occurrence of secondary cases. Any of these conditions fore instance could be brought into Canada, the United States of America, Belgium or the Netherlands either by aero-medical evacuation or inadvertently.

Between 1972 and 1978 there were seven occasions when Canada could have been involved with handling cases of Lassa fever an Ebola like virus. The Government of Canada has purchased several containment bed and transit isolators. These units, with filtered air under negative pressure, accommodate infectious patients being transported and cared for without contaminating medical attendants or the environment. In casu quo under Ebola laboratory conditions.

The latest Lassa Fever patient

A New Jersey patient traveled from Liberia to Morocco to JFK International Airport on May 17th, 2015. The patient did not have a fever on departure from Liberia and did not report symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, or bleeding during the flight, according to the CDC.

His temperature was taken on arrival in the U.S. and he did not have a fever at that time. One day later on May 18th, the patient went to an undisclosed hospital in New Jersey with symptoms of a sore throat, fever and tiredness, according to the CDC.

According to the hospital, he was asked on May 18th about his travel history and he did not indicate travel to West Africa. The patient was sent home the same day and on May 21st returned to the hospital when symptoms worsened, according to the CDC.

The plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) has been used routinely in serological studies with such arena-viruses

The first scientific publication about the Lassa virus, an Ebola like virus, is written by C. Armstrong in 1934; “Experimental lymphotropic chorio meningitis of monkeys and mice produced by a Lassa virus encountered in studies of the 1933 St. Louis Enchephalitis Epidemic, Public Health Rep. 49: 1019 -1027 (1934).

The mentioned scientific plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) in 1933, used in the forties of the last century and long time before the first outbreak in 1969 in Lassa, Nigeria, to us was the first indication that the biological warfare scene did experiments in Africa in order to look for a biological warfare product.

Nowadays Lassa fever is an acute and sometimes severe viral hemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa. One important question regarding Lassa fever is the duration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody after infection. We were able to locate three people who worked in Nigeria dating back to the 1940’s, two of whom were integrally involved in the early outbreaks and investigations of Lassa fever in the late 1960’s, including the person from whom Lassa virus was first isolated. Two persons had high titer of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibody over 40 years after infection, indicating the potential for long-term duration of these antibodies. One person was likely infected in 1952, 17 years before the first recognized outbreak.

Background of Lassa virus

Though first described in 1934 and later in the 1940’s and 1950’s, the virus causing Lassa disease was not publicly and officially identified until 1969. The virus is a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the virus family Arenaviridae.  . Normally about 80% of people who become infected with Lassa virus have no symptoms. One in five infections result in severe bleeding disease, where the virus affects several organs such as the liver, spleen and kidneys.

It is said that normally Lassa fever is a zoonotic disease, meaning that humans become infected from contact with infected animals. The animal reservoir, or host, of Lassa virus is a rodent of the genus Mastomys, commonly known as the “multimammate rat.” Mastomys rats infected with Lassa virus do not become ill, but they can shed the virus in their urine and faeces.

But these rats were infected by scientists, such as Cooper in 1961 and many others before in laboratory models and then set free in the the environment of for instance Lassa, Nigeria, to be precise on blacks in Africa, in order to look after the effects.

Because the clinical course of the disease is so variable, detection of the disease in affected patients has been difficult and that’s why it can be used as a biological warfare agent. However, when presence of the disease is confirmed in a community, prompt isolation of affected patients, good infection protection and control practices and rigorous contact tracing can stop outbreaks.

NOTES:

Ebola like viruses existed long before the first outbreaks in laboratory condition.

  • The first scientific publication about the Lassa virus is written by C. Armstrong in 1934.
  • The first official Ebola like outbreak appears At Marburg University in 1967 in Germany.
  • Though first described in 1934 and later in the 1940’s and 1950’s, the virus causing Lassa disease was not publicly identified until 1969.
  • Mastomys, commonly known as the “multimammate rat.” Mastomys rats infected with Lassa virus do not become ill, but they can shed the virus in their urine and faeces.
  • Because the clinical course of the disease is so variable, detection of the disease in affected patients has been difficult and that’s why it can be used as a biological warfare agent.
  • When presence of the disease is confirmed in a community, prompt isolation of affected patients, good infection protection and control practices and rigorous contact tracing can stop outbreaks.

The Lassa virus plaque assay satisfied the criteria proposed by Cooper in 1961 for determining satisfactory plaque technique

The plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) has been used routinely in serological studies with such arenaviruses as Junin, Machupo, and Parana. However, difficulties have been encountered in using the PRNT for Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus LCM, while conflicting views have been expressed about the reliability and efficacy of the test with Lassa virus. They therefore investigated and evaluated the plaque assay for Lassa virus. In addition, the suitability of the PRNT for determining the potency of a serum and its efficacy in passive immunization for the treatment of Lassa fever was also investigated.

Questions:

How long can Center for Diseases Control and World Health Organization continue to fool the world and Africans? How is it possible that the Lassa virus known in the thirties, forties and fifties in laboratory circumstances, be officially known after outbreak in 1969 in Lassa town in Nigeria?

Answer:

Because it is a secret biological warfare product developed by the Nazis. Later, after the Second World War, the biological warfare product Ebola, was improved under the guidance of Nazi scientists in the United States of America as described in: “Aids and Ebola the greatest crime in medical history against mankind” amazon.com.

The domination of man to subdue others and greed, have caused much destruction in this world. People don’t care about the truth any longer, but we should always remember that when the rain falls, it doesn’t fall on one man’s roof, every health catastrophe or pandemic could easily spread to every part of this world, through terrorism when it falls into wrong hands. What happened on September 11 unexpectedly, should be a lesson for the media to start unfolding the truth about the origins of  Aids and Ebola and bring those responsible to face justice.