Africa In The Hands Of China After Colonialism

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Robert Mugabe shakes hands with the Chinese president, Xi Jinping.  

Like the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, distinguishing the flames of communism, colonialism and Apartheid also faded after the Europeans lost its grip on Africa, when demanding of political independence swept through Africa colony in the fifties.

Even though Africa is much underestimated, the continent’s rich mineral resources always attract both developing and developed countries. China is now actively engaged in Africa, but under heavy criticism, because the West and America see them as opportunists interested in Africa’s resources.

Nearly 600 years ago, the first Chinese reached Africa during the Ming dynasty, a period of cultural restoration and expansion, on the coast of Kenya. The next significant arrival was in the early 1900’s when about 60,000 Chinese miners worked on goldfields in South Africa. Later, Chairman Mao Zedong sent tens of thousands of agricultural and construction workers to Africa to enhance ties with countries emerging from colonialism.

Africa, taken as a continent of ignorance, attract Europeans and Asians because many believe that without enough education, Africa is a place one can easily set up a business and be a boss. A weak economy, influenced by rampant corruption, has allowed African leaders quickly welcoming Chinese business entrepreneurs to Africa. The Chinese have taken over the construction works in Africa, employing hundreds of Chinese and African nationals, becoming the most aggressive investor-nation in Africa.

Although China is playing a significant role in the construction and engineering sectors in Africa, not everything that glitters is gold. Chinese companies are cutting into Africa’s profits. Most African companies are losing jobs to the Chinese companies because a lot of the African leaders have confidence in them and also they offer lower construction prices. Nevertheless; trade between China and Africa reached a new high last year, totaling US$198.5 billion. It is estimated that about 1 million Chinese people are engaged in different sectors in Africa.

The strong presence of Chinese in Africa has sparked controversy, as America and Europe continue to accuse them of flooding the market with inferior or cheap quality products. Due to the rate of poverty, Africans rely on affordable products. It seems they have found solution and satisfaction in Chinese products. To build a good relationship with African leaders China continues to support and giving a loan to Africa to enhance its developments.

In Ghana, a crackdown on illegal miners exploiting the gold industry led to the deportation of thousands of Chinese nationals from the country. The Immigration authorities say more than 4,500 Chinese nationals were repatriated after a series of swoops on illegal goldmines; souring the relationship between the governments of Ghana and China.

Many Ghanaians and local residents aren’t happy over the action of the Ghanaian government. “They were the ones that provided the mining equipment, most of the Ghanaians left behind can’t continue their operations,” said one of the local residents, but many Ghanaians concerned about health and environmental hazards lauded the government’s efforts to curb illegal mining.

The question is: Why years after colonialism Africa still depend on foreign aid, despite economic growth in many parts of the continent significantly outpacing the global average?’ How is the money spent and how can Africa progress without foreign aid? What is the significance of independence when Africa is still crawling like a baby learning how to move around?

Science and technology provide the transformation of every developing and developed country, in this way, Africa have to build expertise in these areas for the economy to take off, but since corruption has affected every infrastructure, the continent has a long way to go and will always lack behind in development.

Brazil’s Mutant GM Mosquitoes Spreading Brain Cancer

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Posted on February 24, 2016 by Sean Adl-Tabatabai in News, World

A doctor has said that he believes the release of 5 million GM mosquitoes per week in Brazil may be causing a rise in brain cancer among humans.

The Brazilian government are currently releasing 5 million transgenic mosquitoes a week into the public, which experts say could have grave implications for the stability of our civilization.

Abreureport.com reports:

The New York Times reports that in the past, “cancer cells have been transferred by mosquitoes from one hamster to another. And so far, three kinds of contagious cancers have been discovered in the wild — in dogs, Tasmanian devils and, most recently, in soft shell crabs.”

Currently, the Tasmanian devil is facing extinction because of a deadly tumor and cancer spreading among the population in the wild, a fate which could one day befall humanity. Contagious cancers and tumors are a scientific fact, and there’s no denying that mosquitoes can pass the deadly cellular breakdown syndrome from one host to another.

According to Dr. Steven Lehrer, there is a “very distinct correlation between the rate of brain cancers and malaria.” Although there are some doubts as to whether there is a direct link between the Zika virus and microcephaly, it is nearly certain that the deadly brain malformation is caused by the mosquito-borne pathogen.

Dr. Lehrer confirms that there has been successful “arthropod transmission of rabbit Papillomatosis, a neoplastic disease studied intensively in relation to cancer because of its tendency toward malignant transformation.”

If mosquitoes can spread cancer in hamsters and rabbits in a laboratory setting, it is very likely that they do so in the wild, and that this has effects throughout the entire ecosystem, rising up in the food chain onto the very plates of food we feed our children.

Although malaria is a horrendous affliction that affects millions of people around the world, its effects on the brain are not as severe as Zika. That the Zika virus affects brain development in fetuses, and that it can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome, a deadly nerve paralysis, is very clear indication that Zika is far deadlier than malaria, and that the rate of brain cancer in Latin America is due to explode to astronomical levels which could cripple the health system of the entire region.

The BBC recently reported that Oxitec’s transgenic mosquitoes may very well make the Aedes aegypti mosquito extinct, but that the ecological niche could be filled by an “equally, or more, undesirable” insect.

It seems that the Aedes aegypti mosquito has indeed become more undesirable since Oxitec began eliminating the weakest ones and strengthening the species, in an effort that can only be compared to Barack Obama’s drone targeted assassination program. We can kill the top mosquitoes, but the ones waiting to take their place are far more ruthless and will behead higher-life from the top of the food chain.

The Next Africa: An Emerging Continent Becomes A Global Powerhouse

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The Next Africa will change the way people think about the continent. The old narrative of an Africa disconnected from the global economy, depicted by conflict or corruption, and heavily dependent on outside donors is fading. A wave of transformation driven by business, modernization, and a new cadre of remarkably talented Africans is thrusting the continent from the world’s margins to the global mainstream.

In the coming decades the magnitude of Africa’s markets and rising influence of its people will intersect with other key trends to shape a new era, one in which Africa’s progress finally overshadows its challenges, transforming an emerging continent into a global powerhouse. The Next Africa captures this story.

Authors Jake Bright and Aubrey Hruby pair their collective decades of Africa experience with several years of direct research and interviews. Packed with profiles; personal stories, research and analysis,The Next Africa is a paradigm-shifting guide to the events, trends, and people reshaping Africa’s relationship to the world.

Bright and Hruby detail the cross-cutting trends prompting Silicon Valley venture capital funds and firms like GE, IBM, and Proctor & Gamble to make major investments in African economies, while describing how Africans are stimulating Milan runways, Hollywood studios, and London pop charts.

The Next Africa introduces readers to the continent’s burgeoning technology movement, rising entrepreneurs, groundbreaking philanthropists, and cultural innovators making an impact in music, fashion, and film. Bright and Hruby also connect Africa’s transformation to its contemporary immigrant diaspora, illustrating how this increasingly affluent group will serve as the thread that pulls the continent’s success together.

Finally, The Next Africa suggests a fresh framework for global citizens, public policy-makers, and CEOs to approach Africa. It will no longer be “The Hopeless Continent”, nor will it become an overnight utopia. Bright and Hruby offer a more nuanced, net-sum, and data-rich approach to analyzing an increasingly complex continent, reconciling its continued challenges with rapid progress.

The Next Africa describes a future of a more globally-connected Africa where its leaders and citizens wield significant economic, cultural, and political power–a future in which Americans will be more likely to own African stocks, work for companies doing business in Africa, buy African hits from iTunes, see Nigerian actors win Oscars, and learn new African names connected to tech moguls and billionaires.

The Authors

 

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Authors Jake Bright and Aubrey Hruby pair their collective decades of Africa experience with several years of direct research and interviews. Packed with profiles; personal stories, research and analysis,The Next Africa is a paradigm-shifting guide to the events, trends, and people reshaping Africa’s relationship to the world.

http://www.amazon.com/Jake-Bright/e/B00QL084RY

The Book of Forgiving: The Fourfold Path For Healing Ourselves And Our World

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Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize winner, Chair of The Elders, and Chair of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, along with his daughter, the Reverend Mpho Tutu, offer a manual on the art of forgiveness—helping us to realize that we are all capable of healing and transformation.

Tutu’s role as the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission taught him much about forgiveness. If you asked anyone what they thought was going to happen to South Africa after apartheid, almost universally it was predicted that the country would be devastated by a comprehensive bloodbath. Yet, instead of revenge and retribution, this new nation chose to tread the difficult path of confession, forgiveness, and reconciliation.

Each of us has a deep need to forgive and to be forgiven. After much reflection on the process of forgiveness, Tutu has seen that there are four important steps to healing: Admitting the wrong and acknowledging the harm; Telling one’s story and witnessing the anguish; Asking for forgiveness and granting forgiveness; and renewing or releasing the relationship. Forgiveness is hard work.

Sometimes it even feels like an impossible task. But it is only through walking this fourfold path that Tutu says we can free ourselves of the endless and unyielding cycle of pain and retribution. The Book of Forgiving is both a touchstone and a tool, offering Tutu’s wise advice and showing the way to experience forgiveness. Ultimately, forgiving is the only means we have to heal ourselves and our aching world.

The Author

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Desmond Mpilo Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 and was only the second black person ever to receive it. In 1986 he was elected archbishop of Cape Town, the highest position in the Anglican Church in South Africa.

In 1994, after the end of apartheid and the election of Nelson Mandela, Tutu was appointed as chair of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission to investigate apartheid-era crimes.

His policy of forgiveness and reconciliation has become an international example of conflict resolution, and a trusted method of post-conflict reconstruction. He is currently the chair of The Elders, where he gives vocal defense of human rights and campaigns for the oppressed.

http://www.amazon.com/Book-Forgiving-Fourfold-Healing-Ourselves/dp/0062203576

Bitter Fruit

With the publication of Kafka’s Curse, Achmat Dangor established himself as an utterly singular voice in South African fiction. His new novel, a finalist for the Man Booker Prize and the IMPAC-Dublin Literary Award, is a clear-eyed, witty, yet deeply serious look at South Africa’s political history and its damaging legacy in the lives of those who live there.

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The last time Silas Ali encountered Lieutenant Du Boise, Silas was locked in the back of a police van and the lieutenant was conducting a vicious assault on Silas’s wife, Lydia, in revenge for her husband’s participation in Nelson Mandela’s African National Congress. When Silas sees Du Boise by chance twenty years later, as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is about to deliver its report, crimes from the past erupt into the present, splintering the Alis’ fragile peace.

Meanwhile Silas and Lydia’s son, Mikey, a thoroughly contemporary young hip-hop lothario, contends in unforeseen ways with his parents’ pasts. A harrowing story of a brittle family on the crossroads of history and a fearless skewering of the pieties of revolutionary movements, Bitter Fruit is a cautionary tale of how we do, or do not, address the past’s deepest wounds.

The Author

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Achmat Dangor (.in 1948), is a South African writer and the CEO of the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg. The Nelson Mandela Foundation promotes and enables the growth of human fulfillment and the continuous expansion of the frontiers of freedom.

Before joining the foundation in January 2007, Mr. Dangor was Director of Advocacy, Communications and Leadership at UNAIDS, and before that, he was Interim Director of the World AIDS Campaign. Previously, Mr. Dangor served as Chief Executive of the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and the Mandela Rhodes Foundation.

Prior to that, he worked in the private sector, including a 13-year stint as a senior executive in Revlon Inc.’s South African subsidiary. As the founding executive director of the Kagiso Trust (1986-1991) he worked alongside prominent political and church leaders, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, to build up the largest black-led foundation in South Africa.

In 1993, Mr. Dangor returned to South Africa to head up the Secretariat of the Drought Forum created by the newly unbanned liberation movements, churches and community organizations to coordinate relief efforts at the height of the severe drought of early 1990’s.

The Forum’s brief was to ensure that government and private resources reached the neediest people and that a solid development foundation was laid. In 1994 he joined the Independent Development Trust (IDT) as director for rural development, and later served as its acting CEO during a crucial transformation period.

During this time he was also a member of various task groups set up by the office of then Deputy President, Thabo Mbeki, to create the Transitional National Development Trust (TNDT) and its successor, the National Development Agency (NDA).

Achmat Dangor is a writer who has published five works of fiction and poetry. It is a vocation that he continues to pursue as he has an active interest in the arts and culture. Random House bought his first USA publication in 1999 and his last novel has been translated into five languages.

The Nelson Mandela Foundation leads the development of a living legacy that captures the vision and values of Nelson Mandela’s life and work. Through the creation of strategic networks and partnerships, the Nelson Mandela Foundation directs resources, knowledge and practice to add value and demonstrate new possibilities. It embodies the spirit of reconciliation, ubuntu and social justice.

http://www.amazon.com/Achmat-Dangor/e/B000API124/