‘CONSPIRACY’ Is A Word Used By The Government Or People Guilty Of Committing A Crime But Feel Threatened

Biological weapons Aids and Ebola

Tony Blair and George Bush: Two biggest liars in the political history of Britain and America

Is It True That Criminals Are Often Awarded?

The world is full of hypocrites, criminals, rapists, racists and their dirty works and schemes are the result of what we are witnessing today: Sick and ailing society, yet nobody wants to be responsible for the menace of our society.

Among the seven continents in the world, none has suffered aggression, slavery, brutality, the brutality of colonization, mental and physical torture, and the deadly tools of Apartheid, than the African continent, yet if crimes against the continent are exposed people, writers, governments, and some journalists who feel threatened, quickly counter attack with countless and useless articles claiming they are conspiracies.

Africa is used as a dumping ground for all unwanted stuff, including bio-weapons materials from Europe and America. Africans are used as Guinea pigs in testing medicines manufactured in Europe and America.

Africans are used for experiments by European and American scientists and pharmaceutical medical staffs to find the right medicine to treat diseases.

Most of the African leaders remain silent because corruption has blinded them to think of what goes into their pockets but not the safety and health of the poor struggling Africans.

There are thousands of classified documents and books revealing those medical crimes, above all some doctors and medical writers, including Susanne Posel and Yoichi Shimatsu have written articles confirming that Aids and Ebola were the works of America to fulfill their  global depopulation programs.

For the world to be one, investigate, and to find out the truth to bring those responsible to justice, they quickly confuse and mislead the public to believe that Aids, Ebola and Zika aren’t bio-weapons but mere conspiracies.

I am repeating it: Aids and Ebola medical crimes aren’t mere conspiracy theories but bio-weapons engineered from the lab of the US government situated in the three countries (Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

This is the reason the Sierra Leone Government closed one of America’s Laboratories in country.Those calling these man-made diseases conspiracies feel threatened because they can’t pay for the consequences that will follow if the truth finally comes out.

Once in Antwerp, under the administration of mayors Leona Detigé and Patrick Janssens, Africans were dieing in large numbers at the Stuivenberg Hospital. The death rate of Afrocans were so high that no African wants to step into that hospital.

Believing they deliberately kill them for body organs, I went to the hospital to investigate. Even though they denied, the death rate of Africans has fallen considerably, yet they called my investigations conspiracy against the Province of Antwerp.

Without any statue of Hitler for killing 6 million Jews, in Brussels stands a statue of King Leopold, a man who masterminded the killing of over ten million Africans, including women and children in Congo. That is what is called a real conspiracy .

Without any weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, George Bush of America and Tony Blair of Britain lied, deceived the world and invaded Iraq. They completely destroyed the country, yet found nothing significant. That is what is called conspiracy.

There is no escape route for evil doers. The blow destined for them is ready, even if they run away they will still live to fight another day. So those calling Aids, Ebola and Zika virus biological weapons conspiracy theories are not going to help them.

We are sick and tired of people and organizations, such as WHO, CDC, FBI and the CIA, causing more destruction to our society by calling Aids, Ebola and Zika virus medical crime conspiracies. No American leader is Jesus, they are all liars.

George Bush lied, Bill Clinton lied after sleeping with Monica Lewinski and later confessed. The same way those medical crimes shall come to light no matter how long it takes.

Western Europe’s Wealth And Africa’s Exploitation: What A Shame?

The wealth of the west, including Belgium was built on Africa's exploitation

Belgium’s exploitation in Africa shows King Baudouin of Belgium and his wife Queen Fabiola waving to well-wishers as they are carried in armchairs. They find it hard to apologise to Africa, instead, they built a statue for Leopold II in support to his crimes.

Britain has never faced up to the dark side of its imperial history

By Richard Drayton: The writer is Rhodes professor of imperial history at King’s College London

Britain was the principal slaving nation of the modern world. In The Empire Pays Back, a documentary broadcast by Channel 4 on Monday, Robert Beckford called on the British to take stock of this past. Why, he asked, had Britain made no apology for African slavery, as it had done for the Irish potato famine?

Why was there no substantial public monument of national contrition equivalent to Berlin’s Holocaust Museum? Why, most crucially, was there no recognition of how wealth extracted from Africa and Africans made possible the vigour and prosperity of modern Britain? Was there not a case for Britain to pay reparations to the descendants of African slaves?

These are timely questions in a summer in which Blair and Bush, their hands still wet with Iraqi blood, sought to rebrand themselves as the saviours of Africa. The G8’s debt-forgiveness initiative was spun successfully as an act of western altruism. The generous Massas never bothered to explain that, in order to benefit, governments must agree to “conditions”, which included allowing profit-making companies to take over public services. This was no gift; it was what the merchant bankers would call a “debt-for-equity swap”, the equity here being national sovereignty.

The sweetest bit of the deal was that the money owed, already more than repaid in interest, had mostly gone to buy industrial imports from the west and Japan, and oil from nations who bank their profits in London and New York. Only in a bookkeeping sense had it ever left the rich world. No one considered that Africa’s debt was trivial compared to what the west really owes Africa.

Beckford’s experts estimated Britain’s debt to Africans in the continent and diaspora to be in the trillions of pounds.

Beckford’s experts estimated Britain’s debt to Africans in the continent and diaspora to be in the trillions of pounds. While this was a useful benchmark, its basis was mistaken. Not because it was excessive, but because the real debt is incalculable. For without Africa and its Caribbean plantation extensions, the modern world as we know it would not exist.

Profits from slave trading and from sugar, coffee, cotton and tobacco are only a small part of the story. What mattered was how the pull and push from these industries transformed western Europe’s economies. English banking, insurance, shipbuilding, wool and cotton manufacture, copper and iron smelting, and the cities of Bristol, Liverpool and Glasgow, multiplied in response to the direct and indirect stimulus of the slave plantations.

Joseph Inikori’s masterful book, Africans and the Industrial Revolution in England, shows how African consumers, free and enslaved, nurtured Britain’s infant manufacturing industry. As Malachy Postlethwayt, the political economist candidly put it in 1745: “British trade is a magnificent superstructure of American commerce and naval power on an African foundation.”

In The Great Divergence, Kenneth Pomeranz asked why Europe, rather than China, made the breakthrough first into a modern industrial economy. To his two answers – abundant coal and New World colonies – he should have added access to west Africa. For the colonial Americas were more Africa’s creation than Europe’s: before 1800, far more Africans than Europeans crossed the Atlantic.

New World slaves were vital too, strangely enough, for European trade in the east. For merchants needed precious metals to buy Asian luxuries, returning home with profits in the form of textiles; only through exchanging these cloths in Africa for slaves to be sold in the New World could Europe obtain new gold and silver to keep the system moving. East Indian companies led ultimately to Europe’s domination of Asia and its 19th-century humiliation of China.

Africa not only underpinned Europe’s earlier development. Its palm oil, petroleum, copper, chromium, platinum and in particular gold were and are crucial to the later world economy. Only South America, at the zenith of its silver mines, outranks Africa’s contribution to the growth of the global bullion supply.

The guinea coin paid homage in its name to the west African origins of one flood of gold. By this standard, the British pound since 1880 should have been rechristened the rand, for Britain’s prosperity and its currency stability depended on South Africa’s mines. I would wager that a large share of that gold in the IMF’s vaults which was supposed to pay for Africa’s debt relief had originally been stolen from that continent.

There are many who like to blame Africa’s weak governments and economies, famines and disease on its post-1960 leadership. But the fragility of contemporary Africa is a direct consequence of two centuries of slaving, followed by another of colonial despotism. Nor was “decolonisation” all it seemed: both Britain and France attempted to corrupt the whole project of political sovereignty.

It is remarkable that none of those in Britain who talk about African dictatorship and kleptocracy seem aware that Idi Amin came to power in Uganda through British covert action, and that Nigeria’s generals were supported and manipulated from 1960 onwards in support of Britain’s oil interests. It is amusing, too, to find the Telegraph and the Daily Mail – which just a generation ago supported Ian Smith’s Rhodesia and South African apartheid – now so concerned about human rights in Zimbabwe.

The tragedy of Mugabe and others is that they learned too well from the British how to govern without real popular consent, and how to make the law serve ruthless private interest. The real appetite of the west for democracy in Africa is less than it seems. We talk about the Congo tragedy without mentioning that it was a British statesman, Alec Douglas-Home, who agreed with the US president in 1960 that Patrice Lumumba, its elected leader, needed to “fall into a river of crocodiles”.

African slavery and colonialism are not ancient or foreign history; the world they made is around us in Britain. It is not merely in economic terms that Africa underpins a modern experience of (white) British privilege. Had Africa’s signature not been visible on the body of the Brazilian Jean Charles de Menezes, would he have been gunned down on a tube at Stockwell? The slight kink of the hair, his pale beige skin, broadcast something misread by police as

The slight kink of the hair, his pale beige skin, broadcast something misread by police as foreign danger. In that sense, his shooting was the twin of the axe murder of Anthony Walker in Liverpool, and of the more than 100 deaths of black people in mysterious circumstances while in police, prison or hospital custody since 1969.

This universe of risk, part of the black experience, is the afterlife of slavery. The reverse of the medal is what WEB DuBois called the “wage of whiteness”, the world of safety, trustworthiness, welcome that those with pale skins take for granted. The psychology of racism operates even among those who believe in human equality, shaping unequal outcomes in education, employment, criminal justice. By its light, such all-white clubs as the G8 continue to meet in comfort.

Early this year, Gordon Brown told journalists in Mozambique that Britain should stop apologising for colonialism. The truth is, though, that Britain has never even faced up to the dark side of its imperial history, let alone begun to apologise.

Dr Richard Drayton is a senior lecturer in imperial and extra-European history since 1500 at Cambridge University. His book The Caribbean and the Making of the Modern World will be published in 2006.