Tammy’s Story: A Young Slave Girl’s Escape To Freedom

TAMMY 1

Nine-year old Rachel Thurlow was assigned to write a story as part of her homeschool study of the institution of slavery that preceded the American Civil War. As Rachel’s writing grew longer, she developed this short story narrative of a young slave girl, Tammy, who escaped from her master and rescued her mother to become fugitive slaves on the run for freedom.

Tammy met another escaped slave, Gabe, and together they had several adventures, while also learning about the Fugitive Slave Law, which forbade people to help escaped slaves, and the Underground Railroad, in which abolitionists specifically broke the law to assist escaped slaves in their quest for freedom.

The end result is this suspense-filled and at times charming tale of escaped slaves on the run, brought to you from the mind of a nine-year old American girl.

The Author

TAMMY 2

Rachel Thurlow was adopted from India when she was three years old, and since then she has learned English and become a full-fledged and happy American girl. She loves America, her friends, family and church, and her writing shows it. Tammy’s Story is Rachel’s first book.

In this book is the result of a homeschool assignment she had on slavery and the US Civil War. Also, the book has some beautiful illustrations in it.

http://www.amazon.com/Tammys-Story-Young-Escape-Freedom/dp/1511406968

Finders Keepers:Simple Book About Complicated Ideas

STEPHEN

Book review by Bethanne Patrick, a freelance writer.

As his dedicated readers know, multiple versions of Stephen King, Author, exist. There is the King of classic horror, like Cujo, Children of the Corn, and Christine. There is the King of feminist uprising, from Carrie toDolores Claiborne to Bag of Bones. There is the King of strong series work, like The Dark Tower and The Green Mile.

I could go on, but the King we meet in the new Finders Keepers (the second of what seems to be a trilogy starting with last year’s Mr. Mercedes) is yet another man: The King of chilling writer tales like Misery, a man who’s long explored the relationship between writing and madness, reading and obsession, artist and audience. In fact, one the things King chews over in this new book is the question of how many versions of an author do exist, and how those versions affect different people.

Finders Keepers picks up years after Mr. Mercedes left off: Famous novelist John Rothstein died back in the first book, and now we’re following zealous Rothstein fan Morris Bellamy, and a boy named Pete Saubers. (You may find plenty of spoilers in other reviews, but not here. It isn’t necessary to know all of the details in order to understand this new book, although they’re given early on in Finders Keepers. If you want to be surprised, pick upMr. Mercedes first.)

Due to an unexpected find, Saubers has become quite an expert on the late, reclusive Rothstein, whose creation and legacy must have been delicious fun for King to develop; he’s a mid-20th-century literary lion in the vein of J.D. Salinger and John Updike. Rothstein’s oeuvre even has Updike-esque titles: The Runner, The Runner Sees Action, and The Runner Slows Down.

When villainy threatens the Saubers family, they fortunately hit the radar of an eccentric trio (also from the first book): Ex-cop Bill Hodges, tech expert Jerome Robinson, and researcher Holly Gibney. At first, following three storylines—Bellamy’s, Pete’s, and the trio’s—feels a little elementary, the reading equivalent of training wheels, even though the writing is as sound as ever.

Then you remember that almost everyone needs training wheels before they take off on just two. King picks up the pace almost instantaneously, and vroooooooom, there goes the action! Vroom, too, goes the consideration of what is means to be a close reader. What matters more—knowing every detail, or understanding the big picture? Can you ever hold a writer responsible for his work, or does a reader’s interpretation change things?

Most important, perhaps, is the question of how we read other people. Most of the characters in this novel have their vision clouded one way or another, a mistake that can be costly. Stephen King sometimes writes complicated books about simple things (cars, baseball); here he writes a simple book about complicated ideas. And if, at first, you think Finders Keepers is meat-and-potatoes King, just wait: The dessert is really satisfying.

The Author

STEPHEN 2

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Doctor Sleep and Under the Dome, now a major TV miniseries on CBS. His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller as well as the Best Hardcover Book Award from the International Thriller Writers Association. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

http://www.amazon.com/Stephen-King/e/B000AQ0842/

Found, Near Water

KATE 4

Rena Sutherland wakes from a coma into a mother’s nightmare. Her daughter is missing – lost for four days – but no one has noticed; no one has complained; no one has been searching.

As the victim support officer assigned to her case, Christine Emmett puts aside her own problems as she tries to guide Rena through the maelstrom of her daughter’s disappearance.

A task made harder by an ex-husband desperate for control; a paedophile on early-release in the community; and a psychic who knows more than seems possible.

And intertwined throughout, the stories of six women; six daughters lost.

I thought that not knowing was the worst thing I could ever endure. Not knowing if she was in trouble or needing my help or in pain. I worried that she’d been taken by someone that would hurt her, then I worried that she’d been taken by someone who would love her and care for her and in a year or two she’d have forgotten I ever existed. Not knowing was killing me.

The police found her body stuffed into an old recycling bin out the back of a sleep-out. My beautiful girl had been bent to fit as though she was just a piece of rubbish, something to be disposed of.

When I went to the hospital to identify my beautiful girl’s broken body – that was worse than not knowing. When I buried her in the cemetery and compared the size of the gravesite to the other freshly buried bodies – that was worse than not knowing.

When I drank myself to sleep on the anniversary of her sixth birthday, and realised that I would likely be doing that until my life ended – that was worse than not knowing.

The Author

Kate 5

Katherine Hayton is a 41 year old woman who works in insurance, doesn’t have children or pets, can’t drive, has lived in Christchurch her entire life, and currently resides two minutes walk from where she was born. For some reason she’s developed a rich fantasy life.

http://www.amazon.com/Katherine-Hayton/e/B00LPAR872