Green Planet: A Poem By Lori Triggs

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At one time our planet was colorful as lush with plants even flowers 

And towering trees beautiful I can see,

The planet was filled with animals even birds more species that was plentiful

While the mammals and fish filled the oceans even waters majestic,

The oceans with lakes even rivers as the waters where aqua or

Torques blue lovely green was a fantasy.

 

Now our planet is filled with tons trash on the streets even

At the garbage dumps filled to the top to no end,

The planet not colorful or lush with plants even flowers

And towering trees it becoming a waste land of dirt and mud,

Even homes plus businesses filled with humans to see

The animals even birds is getting scarce means no food or wildlife,

While the mammals and fish are finding up dead in the waters

Or land means no food or sea life.

The oceans with lakes even rivers as the waters are brown,

Or nasty green will be unsafe to drink this is not a fantasy.

 

We should help the planet even ourselves by recycling

bottles, paper, cardboard, cans even glass in recycling centers,

Make green homes by using reused materials granite, tiles, wood,

Bottles, paper, cardboard, cans even glass solar tubes, & solar energy

Plus solar water, everything energy officiant,

The cars we use should be hydrogen, solar, electric or hybrid

So go green not brown if we keep what we are doing we are all dead!

Copyrighted July 17 2008

Child Soldiers: Children Who Don’t Know What Classroom And Education Are

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Young boys are often lured by some African leaders to fight for ‘freedom’

Third World Countries are plagued by crisis. Among the most critical is poverty, which has taken hundreds of children out of the classroom. Children are the world’s greatest resource, future leaders, and assets to national development, thus; it is, therefore the right of every child to be educated; unfortunately, worldwide many children aren’t aware of what education is, instead serving as slaves under child labour and serving as child soldiers in fields and wars.

As a child growing up in Africa, I find myself in an environment witnessing how many parents struggle to educate their children. Every weekend, I go hawking as a trader with banana, eggs, and bread, just to make some extra money to help my parents to keep me in the classroom. In the early hours of the morning a friend of mine sells newspapers as a vendor, before coming to school at 8 A.M. Despite the global assistance and benefits from advanced countries, many children in poor countries have no access to education.

There are no words to describe the plight of children roaming the streets in Africa, Asia, and South America, due to poverty. In the rural areas, imagine a school without a roof, as children sit and learn under shady trees. Imagine a child who carries his table and chair to learn and after school carries them back home. The classrooms haven’t any tables and chairs thus; the parents struggling to educate their children must provide those tables and chairs, with difficulties sometimes of buying textbooks.

Poverty hasn’t only taken children out of school but has also brought misery, sickness and exposing them as prey to physical or sexual abuse, having a devastating impact on families and communities. Due to poverty parents engage children in child labor, in order to improve their chances of attaining basic necessities. Extreme poverty statistics in parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America has pushed many children there to become child laborers.

How the European Union is making a difference in Somalia

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, once told a Georgetown University student that he experienced racism as a young Asian-American growing up in Iowa, but that he learned the true meaning of his identity when he began working to end poverty in Haiti, one of the world’s poorest nations. The stride to end or alleviate poverty is a costly and long-term process; it has therefore become illusion than a reality and also loan was given to poor countries to fight poverty, often lands in the pocket of corrupt government officials. However, many foreign agencies, foundations and private associations are supporting and financing educational projects in Africa.

In Somalia, the European Union and its member states are collectively the largest donors in its educational development. The country has the weakest educational structure in the world and will not achieve any of the Millennium Development Goals on education by 2015. The European Union support focuses on creating primary and secondary education opportunities, vocational training and boosting employment.

The United Kingdom as part of the donors assisting Somalia launched Girls Education Challenge, worth £21.3 million to get girls into school and ensure that they receive the quality education and the new government-run program called Go2School  to give a free elementary school education, has been successful putting  at least 1 million children into the classroom.

CHILD SOLDIER 1

Head Of State

STATE

When a young investigative reporter is found dead on the streets of London few people notice. But when another body – minus its head and hands – is washed up on the banks of the Thames, its grisly condition arouses a little more interest.

There appears to be no connection between the two dead men. But, unsuspected by the electorate, there is a shocking and dangerous secret at the very heart of government. While the United Kingdom approaches a crucial and delicately-balanced referendum on Europe, a group of ruthlessly determined individuals will stop at nothing – including murder – to prevent the truth from getting out.

Andrew Marr’s first novel is a gleefully twisted spin through the corridors of power. Making full use of his unrivalled inside knowledge of the British political scene, Marr has threaded his wickedly clever thriller with a distinctive strand of pitch-black humour, to offer an irreverent glimpse behind the parliamentary curtain.

The Author

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Andrew William Stevenson Marr (born 31 July 1959) is a Scottish journalist and political commentator. He edited The Independent for two years until May 1998, and was political editor of BBC News from 2000 until 2005.

He began hosting a political programme Sunday AM, now called The Andrew Marr Show, on Sunday mornings on BBC One from September 2005. Marr also hosts the BBC Radio 4 programme Start the Week.

In 2007 he presented a political history of post-war Britain on BBC Two, Andrew Marr’s History of Modern Britain, followed by a prequel in 2009 – Andrew Marr’s The Making of Modern Britain focusing on the period between 1901 and 1945.

Most recently, he presented a series, Andrew Marr’s Megacities, examining the life, development and challenges of some of the largest cities in the world.

http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Marr/e/B001HPXUPY/

Paid For: My Journey Through Prostitution

 

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An astonishingly brave memoir of life in prostitution and its lingering influence on a woman’s psyche and life.

“The best work by anyone on prostitution ever, Rachel Moran’s Paid For fuses the memoirist’s lived poignancy with the philosopher’s conceptual sophistication. The result is riveting, compelling, incontestable. Impossible to put down.

This book provides all anyone needs to know about the reality of prostitution in moving, insightful prose that engages and disposes of every argument ever raised in its favor.” ―Catharine A. MacKinnon, law professor, University of Michigan and Harvard University

Born to mentally unstable parents, Rachel Moran left home at the age of fourteen. Being homeless, she became prostituted to survive. With intelligence and empathy, she describes the fears she and others had working on the streets and in the brothels.

Moran also speaks to the psychological damage that accompanies prostitution and the estrangement from one’s body. At the age of twenty-two, Moran escaped prostitution. She has since become a writer and an abolitionist activist.

The Author

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Rachel Moran grew up in North Dublin city. From a troubled family background, she was fourteen when she was taken into state care. She became homeless and got involved in prostitution at aged fifteen, working in Dublin and other Irish cities for the following seven years.

In 1998, at the age of 22, she liberated herself from that life. At 24, she got on the path to further education, gaining a degree in journalism from Dublin City University, where she won the Hybrid Award for excellence in journalism.

She speaks internationally on prostitution and sex-trafficking and volunteers to talk to young girls in residential care about the harms and dangers in prostitution. She lives in North Dublin.

http://www.amazon.com/Paid-My-Journey-Through-Prostitution/dp/0717160327