Brazil’s Mutant GM Mosquitoes Spreading Brain Cancer

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Posted on February 24, 2016 by Sean Adl-Tabatabai in News, World

A doctor has said that he believes the release of 5 million GM mosquitoes per week in Brazil may be causing a rise in brain cancer among humans.

The Brazilian government are currently releasing 5 million transgenic mosquitoes a week into the public, which experts say could have grave implications for the stability of our civilization.

Abreureport.com reports:

The New York Times reports that in the past, “cancer cells have been transferred by mosquitoes from one hamster to another. And so far, three kinds of contagious cancers have been discovered in the wild — in dogs, Tasmanian devils and, most recently, in soft shell crabs.”

Currently, the Tasmanian devil is facing extinction because of a deadly tumor and cancer spreading among the population in the wild, a fate which could one day befall humanity. Contagious cancers and tumors are a scientific fact, and there’s no denying that mosquitoes can pass the deadly cellular breakdown syndrome from one host to another.

According to Dr. Steven Lehrer, there is a “very distinct correlation between the rate of brain cancers and malaria.” Although there are some doubts as to whether there is a direct link between the Zika virus and microcephaly, it is nearly certain that the deadly brain malformation is caused by the mosquito-borne pathogen.

Dr. Lehrer confirms that there has been successful “arthropod transmission of rabbit Papillomatosis, a neoplastic disease studied intensively in relation to cancer because of its tendency toward malignant transformation.”

If mosquitoes can spread cancer in hamsters and rabbits in a laboratory setting, it is very likely that they do so in the wild, and that this has effects throughout the entire ecosystem, rising up in the food chain onto the very plates of food we feed our children.

Although malaria is a horrendous affliction that affects millions of people around the world, its effects on the brain are not as severe as Zika. That the Zika virus affects brain development in fetuses, and that it can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome, a deadly nerve paralysis, is very clear indication that Zika is far deadlier than malaria, and that the rate of brain cancer in Latin America is due to explode to astronomical levels which could cripple the health system of the entire region.

The BBC recently reported that Oxitec’s transgenic mosquitoes may very well make the Aedes aegypti mosquito extinct, but that the ecological niche could be filled by an “equally, or more, undesirable” insect.

It seems that the Aedes aegypti mosquito has indeed become more undesirable since Oxitec began eliminating the weakest ones and strengthening the species, in an effort that can only be compared to Barack Obama’s drone targeted assassination program. We can kill the top mosquitoes, but the ones waiting to take their place are far more ruthless and will behead higher-life from the top of the food chain.

Was Genetic Engineering A Factor In The Zika Outbreak?

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Originally published in VETERANS TODAY By Richard Edmondson on February 1, 2016

Sometimes I think humans are the stupidest species on the planet. We are the only species that, solely for the sake of profit, endeavor to develop technologies that not only are completely unnecessary for our survival but have a potential risk factor of bringing about our own destruction. This has been going on for much of the last century, and we have amply demonstrated over the same time we will believe any lie told to us provided it comes from a “credible” source.

And one of those “credible” sources is “science.”

I normally am not a science writer, but for the past few days stories about genetically modified mosquitoes have been buzzing around the Internet with regard to Zika, the latest virus that seems to be threatening certain populations in lesser developed areas of the world. Depending upon which source you believe, such mosquitoes are either, a) the solution to the Zika outbreak, or, b) the cause of it.

Let’s examine theory “a” first. The idea that GM mosquitoes (GMM) might rescue the people of Brazil and other countries seems to stem from  a January 19 press release put out by Oxitech, a British company that describes itself as “a pioneer in controlling insects that spread disease and damage crops.”

The gist of the press release is that the company will be opening a “mosquito production facility” in the city of Piracicaba, Brazil, the function of which will be to produce “self-limiting mosquitoes whose offspring do not survive.” The male mosquitoes have been genetically altered in such a way that they are incapable, theoretically at any rate, of producing viable offspring. Thus, the GMM’s will be released into the wild, where they will mate with female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the main vector of the Zika virus, and henceforth they will dramatically reduce the mosquito population.

That’s the theory, at any rate. Fox News, NPR, CBS, The Guardian, Time, CNN and others all went with the story, all plugging the use of GMM’s and suggesting it might be useful in the fight against the Zika virus.

“There is no biological mechanism by which the Oxitec bug’s modified pieces of DNA can transfer into human DNA, or into other mammals and insects,” Ford Vox asserts confidently in an opinion piece at CNN.

Continue reading: http://www.veteranstoday.com/2016/02/01/was-genetic-engineering-a-factor-in-the-zika-outbreak/

Organization Save The Frog Launches A New Book Highlighting Amphibians

Half of the profits from the sale of this book will be donated to SAVE THE FROGS!, so please go order your copy today! Order your copy by contributing to the Amphibian Love crowdfunding campaign at: http://igg.me/at/amphibianlove
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San Jose artist Leah Jay has created a beautiful book called “Amphibian Love”, filled with dazzling nature art to help endangered animals. Amphibians are vital to the earth’s ecosystems, and their loss is an indication of the worldwide trend in decreasing biodiversity – the “Sixth Extinction”.

Leah’s hardbound book features detailed watercolor and chalk pastel illustrations of various species frogs, toads, salamanders, and newts. The rhyming text within the illustrations makes each piece attractive and educational. This book will be a great resource for young readers to interest them in these fascinating animals and makes an excellent addition to anybody’s coffee table!

The Amphibian Love book campaign page is active through the month of April, with a book pre-order option of $35, and other art-based incentives including the original paintings. The April campaign coincides with Earth Day, 4/22, and International Save The Frogs Day , 4/25

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Order your copy of Amphibian Love at:
http://igg.me/at/amphibianlove
Your FREE copy of The Little Book of Frog Poetry, Volume 1

The Little Book of Frog Poetry is not available for sale anywhere on the planet and only 2,000 copies exist, but we will send you a free copy when you buy Amphibian Love. Since 2009 I have read through thousands of frog poems that our supporters submitted to the SAVE THE FROGS! Poetry Contest. In February 2015, SAVE THE FROGS! Graphic Design Volunteer Alyson Lee and I put together some of our all time favorite frog poems and created The Little Book of Frog Poetry, Volume 1.

The poetry contained in this book is among the best frog poetry ever written, so I know it will provide inspiration, education and enjoyment to thousands of students, teachers and frog lovers. And of course the book features amazing frog art from around the world. Thanks to our generous donors, we printed 2,000 copies and have been distributing them to schools, libraries and Save The Frogs Day event organizers in order to raise awareness for the frogs we love. Please order a copy for yourself, enjoy the poetic frog inspiration and help spread our amphibious message far and wide!
Order Amphibian Love and get your free copy of The Little Book of Frog Poetry, Volume 1

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About Leah Jay, the artist

A lifelong artist, nature lover, and San Jose resident, Leah has spent 15 years perfecting her mixed watercolor and pastel illustration technique. She teaches art and shows her work locally.
http://www.leahjayart.com/about

#amphibianlove

Learn more about Amphibian Love:
http://www.leahjayart.com/amphibianlove

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Thank you for supporting Amphibian Conservation and Wildlife Art, and happy Earth Day!

Please order Amphibian Love and The Little Book of Frog Poetry at:
http://igg.me/at/amphibianlove

Thanks and happy  FrogSave The s Day week!
Dr. Kerry Kriger
SAVE THE FROGS!
Founder, Executive Director, Ecologist
www.savethefrogs.com
http://www.savethefrogs.com/kerry-kriger
kerry@savethefrogs.com
415-878-6525 (voicemail)
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“Every once in awhile, you meet a person that inspires you with their dedication to a cause. Dr. Kerry Kriger, founder and director of SAVE THE FROGS!, is one of those inspiring people I’ve been lucky enough to meet.”
— Leah Jay, Author of Amphibian Love, San Jose, CA

ABOUT SAVE THE FROGS!

Frogs are the most threatened group of animals on the planet: nearly 2,000 of the world’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction and up to 200 species have entirely disappeared in recent decades. Save The Frogs Day! is the world’s leading amphibian conservation organization. We work in California, across the USA, and around the world to prevent the extinction of amphibians, and to create a better planet for humans and wildlife. Your financial contributions to SAVE THE FROGS! are tax-deductible and enable us to spread amphibian awareness, campaign for threatened amphibians and train the next generation of amphibian conservationists. Please donate, become a member, or help us fundraise. Thank you!

 Please forward this email to your friends and colleagues to help spread the word. You can write to us at SAVE THE FROGS!, PO Box 78758, Los Angeles, CA 90016 USA or call us at 415-878-6525. If you prefer not to receive future emails about our efforts to protect the world’s most endangered animals, you can unsubscribe at: http://savethefrogs.com/unsubscribe