Trying To Live In The Mind Of A Slave

SLAVERY 1

Circa 1910: Three Abyssinian slaves in iron collars and chains. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Who knows how it feels to be a slave? It’s only a slave who can vividly tell someone his or her ordeal. Years after the abolition of slavery, if Africans and African-Americans, are still fruitlessly  struggling to regain their lost identity, then what did their ancestors went through as slaves outside Africa, in the period of slavery?

If I look at the picture above, I see probably a mother and her two sons. The inability of the woman to help her sons has put pressure on her, taking her into a state of hopelessness, insecurity, and bewilderment.

I don’t think they requested to take this image because slave owners don’t listen to the cry of slaves, yet the older boy puts a little smile on his face, whole the younger one shows a face of defiance, as his family becomes a subject of humiliation and ridicule.

Recorded facts about slavery are that over the period of the Atlantic Slave Trade, from approximately 1526 to 1867, about 12.5 million slaves shipped from Africa, only 10.7 million had arrived in the America and the Caribbean. The Atlantic Slave Trade, therefore, was likely to be the most costly in human life of all of the long-distance global migrations.

On February 1, 1865, Abraham Lincoln who was then president of the United States of America, signed a resolution and outlawed slavery, since then National Freedom Day is annually observed on February 1, but years after the abolition, the scars and remnants of slavery are still haunting African-Americans or the Black man today.

They say we should forgive and forget, but certain things can’t be forgotten, because it’s like a picture hanging on the wall. We see it every day.

“Why Many Africans Call Me The White Negro”- Professor Johan Van Dongen

Aids and Ebola medical crimes

Johan Van Dongen is a Dutch scientist and microsurgeon who found out that Aids and Ebola were bio-weapons against Africa after 42 years research

Micro-Surgeon and scientist, Johan Van Dongen, is a Dutchman born in Rotterdam. Like most scientists, he has enjoyed a very good life in his laboratory professional duties and also as a former lecturer in the university. His love for mankind is exceptional since he believes every living thing on earth which has breath, needs to properly care for, instead of destruction.

 
                           His priority is the engagement,  commitment, and love for Africans and Africa in general, the fact that the continent of Africa, has suffered a great deal in the hands of the Europeans and Americans.  Africans are mocked, abused, raped, mutilated, forced to move homes, used as slaves and guinea pigs for drug tests, by the criminal pharmaceutical, medical, political and military establishments.
                            “Thousands of Africans are killed by foreign countries and corrupt African regimes. I think now it is time to pay back the ordinary African people, what we took from them. The reason it’s has been one of my responsibilities to expose in my books, which were published in Dutch, that Aids and Ebola were indeed medical crimes committed against Africa,” says Professor Johan Van Dongen.
                           “There is absolutely no place for egos or what so ever and I think especially Africans within the diaspora, should help Africans without delay and with all the engagement they have…It will not cost Africans in the Diaspora to work on a documentary film, to bring to the understanding of the common man that Aids and Ebola were medical crimes against Africa. Such project would bring respect for the Africans in the Diaspora, to lift the image of Africa, after all, that’s where their descendants were stolen from,” stressed Dongen.
                              “I am very fortunate that several Africans call me a white negro because I work unselfishly and because of my whistleblowing work, by revealing that Aids and Ebola were medical crimes against humanity, I lost almost everything… There is no one other to blame for my bitter experience, than myself, because I knew what I’m going to pass through in a country like Holland. But I chose the path of integrity than mixing with white-collar liars, butchers, killers and ruthless people.”
                             “I am not looking for money or fame. What I am looking for are people with a heart for Africa in the first place and I have found one in Joel Savage. He has that kind of heart and that is why he is a friend for life…As for African leaders,  I feel very sorry for them, because many have disappointed Africans miserably.