The Successful Music Career Of Winston Rodney, Aka Burning Spear

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In a display of true humbleness, Burning Spear, is no doubt one of the greatest reggae artists the world has ever known. Born as Winston Rodney, on Ist March 1945, in Saint Ann’s Bay in Jamaica, musicians such as “The Maytals” and “Bob Marley and the Wailers” influenced him.

According to him, it was his encounter with Bob Marley, that ignited his life to fame from 1969. He has then made a couple of songs, but doesn’t know where to start. Then Bob told him to go to “Studio One” and he did. Today among great reggae artists, his music can be heard in every part of the world.

In the lives of individuals, many do remember the mistake one does, than all the good things the person has done. But Burning Spear didn’t forget the direction Bob gave him. He gave credit to Bob Marley in his song “As it is” taken from his album ” Calling Rastafari.” He sings, “I start singing in the late sixties. Told about Studio One by Bob Marley.” But who is actually this man called Burning Spear and why did he choose such a name unto himself?

I never had the opportunity to interview Mr. Rodney, like other great reggae stars, but just as he has been following the footsteps of the great Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King etc, believing God send them to help black people, the same way, I have been following his music for a very long time.

Like the waves retreating into the sea, I went back and compiled the names of some of his old and new songs, to find out the message of Burning Spear’s music. Yes “He stands strong, The world should know, that Man in the hills, Far over, Calling Rastafari to Jah’s Kingdom. His mistress music don’t sell out and Christopher Columbus can’t change his Identity and Fittest of the fittest has made him a Free man.”

Being inspired by the late Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya, Burning Spear put the title of Jomo Kenyatta (Burning Spear ) unto himself as his name. From there on, the flame of the spear is unquenchable, singing about slavery, discrimination and praising men like Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, Kwame Nkrumah and Martin Luther King etc. His reason of cherishing these men are simple and logical, because they paved the way for I and I (Africans) to be recognised.

Spear 1Burning Spear showed his love for Africa from his great hit “Greetings” from the album “Far Over,” after his trip to Africa. Greetings Kenya, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Addis Ababa.” He said. He lamented bitterly about blacks in the United States of America who have no intention and respect for the culture. As if they have forgotten their history, some even hate to be referred to as Africans. “Even though they say I’m a Yankee” Burning Spear said he still loves them because they are his brothers and sisters.

After over thirty years of his prolific music career, the tireless Burning Spear surprisingly after his 27th album special, released in 1999, Calling Rastafari, which won the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album in 2000. In 2003, he released another album captioned “Free man” with great numbers such as “Trust, Not Guilty, loved for who I am etc”

Despite that MTV doesn’t promote reggae music, Burning Spear has excelled to be one of the world’s famous musicians. His songs speak of its self. Truly, the achievements of Burning Spear, in the field of reggae, shall remain in the music history for ever.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_8?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=burning+spear&sprefix=Burning+%2Cstripbooks%2C1154

The Legacy Of Gregory Isaacs: The Cool Ruler Of Reggae

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Once you love music, including reggae, then you will know who Gregory Isaacs is. He doesn’t need any introduction as a reggae star, probably one of the most popular and versatile reggae singers the world has ever produced. The smooth-enchanting voice of the Gregory, since from the seventies continue to steal the heart of ladies throughout the world, until he succumbed to illness. 

Throughout the course of his prolific career as international reggae star, Gregory Isaacs produced classic reggae tunes hard to resist. He is known to record over five hundred albums, igniting the reggae world, including Britain, America and Jamaica, his native country, although he lived in United Kingdom in all his career.

On stage the well dressed cool reggae legend, stole the heart of thousands of reggae fans worldwide and on numerous occasions flowers are given to him on stage. Some of his hit which made him famous was his 1982 Night Nurse album. He recorded great singles including ‘Hard Drugs, Not The Way, Mr. Brown and a host of others.

The smooth-voiced dancehall crooner behind the genre’s landmark 1982 LP Night Nurse — passed away on October 25, 2010, at his London home following a year-long battle with lung cancer, the BBC reports. Isaacs was 59. “Gregory was well loved by everyone, his fans and his family, and he worked really hard to make sure he delivered the music they loved and enjoyed,” Isaacs’ wife Linda said. “He will be greatly missed by his family and friends.”

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Joel Savage and Gregory Isaacs

Over the course of his prolific career — in which he release an estimated 500 albums within Jamaica, the UK and the U.S. — Isaacs collaborated with reggae, dub and dancehall icons like Lee “Scratch” Perry, King Tubby, Sugar Minott, Freddie McGregor, Dennis Brown and Errol Holt. After spending the Seventies building a reputation as both a top-notch roots reggae singer and a soulful “lovers rock”-style crooner, Isaacs recorded his masterpiece Night Nurse at Bob Marley’s Tuff Gong Studios in 1982, the year after Marley’s death.

Isaacs was poised to become a worldwide star when Night Nurse climbed to Number 32 on the British charts, but instead found himself sentenced to six months in a Jamaican prison on illegal firearm charges. (Isaacs’ police record is almost as prolific as his discography, with over 50 reported arrests in his lifetime.) Dubbed the “Cool Ruler” by fans, Isaacs wrestled with drug addiction throughout his career, eventually losing his teeth and jeopardizing his legendary voice from persistent drug use, but he continued to make music, releasing his final album, Brand New Me, in 2008.

Read the interview I had with Gregory in Belgium before his death: http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ

Morgan Heritage: A Family Of Talented Musicians

 

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The Jamaican Family Reggae Group Called Morgan Heritage

For some years now Morgan Heritage group has enjoyed considerable success with a string of quality albums. Their albums “Don’t Haffi Dread”, “Three in one” and “More Teachings” are masterpieces of contemporary reggae music.

Talent sometimes could be inherited and the man in charge of their success seems to be their father, Denroy Morgan. Way back in the sixties, Denroy emigrated to the US from Jamaica, where he raised his children.

Morgan Heritage, usually called “The royal family of reggae” have captured the hearts of their audience by utilizing live instruments such as guitars, horns and hand drums. Their music and impeccable harmonies add up to a truly uplifting spirits, where ever they play.

There is poverty, discrimination and criminality everywhere and this is where Morgan Heritage comes in because their message of peace, love and understanding is a key to solutions for a better world.

Last month, October 3, the siblings stormed Kenya for second time to entertain reggae fans at the Nyaho National Stadium. It’s great for the group to visit Africa, because many Jamaican musicians sing Africa, but only few have visited the continent of their ancestors.

“We are ready to come to any country in Africa we love you all and can’t wait to be in your country Kenya, Malawi, Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, Gambia, Ethiopia, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Uganda, Morocco, Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin, Sierra Leone, Liberia. We are so ready but you must call your local radio stations or government and local promoters in your country and the Morgan family will be there ready,” read the Facebook post,” writes Gramps Morgan.

Listen to Morgan Heritage plays ‘More Teachings’: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAwfD97vvI0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5wpbNdLVjs

What Is It Like To Be A Woman?

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One of Marilyn Monroe’s quote which reveals how unique, special and different a woman is.

I am a married man for the past 21 years, yet I can’t say I know a lot about women. My wife gets angry with me sometimes, when I know I’m right and she is wrong. But since I don’t want to lean upon my understanding, which may be wrong, I quickly apologize to her to create a happy atmosphere once again.

I work at a place with over forty female teachers. I ‘m always scared to smile, paranoid may be, because I don’t want any of the ladies there to have in mind that I want her. I therefore maintain a serious mood at my work place. Unfortunately, I was doing more harm to myself than good.

In the first year, I realized pure hatred from some of the teachers towards me. Action speaks louder than words, so don’t ask me how I know that they hate me please. In fact, some people can’t control their emotions when they hate you. Many pretend they haven’t seen me, even though I’m very close to those tempting bodies, fashion and magic perfumes.

The hate towards me increased to a certain level that I decided to find solution immediately, to present myself a faithful and trustful person among them. I started greeting those I’ve never greeted at the school before. Some just walked away without response but some gave me recognition and responded. That encouraged me to continue the greetings.

Did I forget myself as an African, when there is a proverb in Africa that says a woman is a beautiful flower in the middle of the garden and the man is the fence around it? Did I also forget that in Mexico, it is said men that treat women very good were brought up by queens? “If she’s amazing, she won’t be easy. If she’s easy, she won’t be amazing. If she’s worth it, you won’t give up. If you give up, you’re not worthy. … Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for.” Did I also forget this great quote from the reggae legend Bob Marley?

Once you have a clean heart and ready to change things in your life, you will be successful. I became friendlier with broad smile on my face daily. Once I met one of the ladies who hate me most, with a cup of coffee in one hand and books in the other hand, trying to open a door and I rushed like the late Christopher Reeve in his Super Man series, to open the door for her.

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An African proverb revealing the greatness and importance of a woman in the society.

It was that very day, she asked of my name and she told me hers. Since then we communicate regularly and laugh over many things. In life, never judge a woman wrongly. Like every human being, some are introvert and others extrovert. Some may be very quiet but that doesn’t mean that they hate you, while others quickly engage in conversation with you.

So what is it like to be a woman? Don’t feel great or superior over a woman. Respect her opinion and don’t underestimate her. That will open the way to know her very well to understand the sort of creatures women are.

http://www.amazon.com/Joel-Savage/e/B008SCTYI6

Emperor Haile Selassie’s Address To The United Nations Which Part Of The Speech Became Bob Marley’s Hit

There are thousands of great people from all walks of life worldwide, but only few become famous after death. Bob Marley is one of them. I think in every corner of the world, there is no one who would mention the names of reggae artists, without first mentioning his name. Like Peter Tosh, the life and music of Bob Marley is an endless account.

Belgian-African journalist and author Joel Savage, highlights on one of the great songs which made Bob Marley famous in his early musical career. Out of the speech of former Ethiopia leader, Emperor Haile Selassie, which was delivered in Geneva in 1963, Bob Marley played the hit named ‘War.’ Bob would have been 70 on February 6, 2015, if he is alive.

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The late Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia.

Mr. President, Distinguished Delegates: 

Twenty-seven years ago, as Emperor of Ethiopia, I mounted the rostrum in Geneva, Switzerland, to address the League of Nations and to appeal for relief from the destruction which had been unleashed against my defenseless nation, by the Fascist invader.I spoke then both to and for the conscience of the world. My words went unheeded, but history testifies to the accuracy of the warning that I gave in 1936.

Today, I stand before the world organization which has succeeded to the mantle discarded by its discredited predecessor. In this body is enshrined the principle of collective security which I unsuccessfully invoked at Geneva. Here, in this Assembly, reposes the best – perhaps the last – hope for the peaceful survival of mankind.

In 1936, I declared that it was not the Covenant of the League that was at stake, but international morality. Undertakings, I said then, are of little worth if the will to keep them is lacking. The Charter of the United Nations expresses the noblest aspirations of man: abjuration of force in the settlement of disputes between states; the assurance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion; the safeguarding of international peace and security.

But these, too, as were the phrases of the Covenant, are only words; their value depends wholly on our will to observe and honor them and give them content and meaning. The preservation of peace and the guaranteeing of man’s basic freedoms and rights require courage and eternal vigilance: courage to speak and act – and if necessary, to suffer and die – for truth and justice; eternal vigilance, that the least transgression of international morality shall not go undetected and un-remedied. These lessons must be learned anew by each succeeding generation, and that generation is fortunate indeed which learns from other than its own bitter experience. This Organization and each of its members bear a crushing and awesome responsibility: to absorb the wisdom of history and to apply it to the problems of the present, in order that future generations may be born, and live, and die, in peace.

The record of the United Nations during the few short years of its life affords mankind a solid basis for encouragement and hope for the future. The United Nations has dared to act, when the League dared not in Palestine, in Korea, in Suez, in the Congo. There is not one among us today who does not conjecture upon the reaction of this body when motives and actions are called into question. The opinion of this Organization today acts as a powerful influence upon the decisions of its members. The spotlight of world opinion, focused by the United Nations upon the transgressions of the renegades of human society, has thus far proved an effective safeguard against unchecked aggression and unrestricted violation of human rights.

The United Nations continues to sense as the forum where nations whose interests clash may lay their cases before world opinion. It still provides the essential escape valve without which the slow build-up of pressures would have long since resulted in catastrophic explosion. Its actions and decisions have speed the achievement of freedom by many people on the continents of Africa and Asia. Its efforts have contributed to the advancement of the standard of living of peoples in all corners of the world.

For this, all men must give thanks. As I stand here today, how faint, how remote are the memories of 1936.How different in 1963 are the attitudes of men. We then existed in an atmosphere of suffocating pessimism. Today, cautious yet buoyant optimism is the prevailing spirit. But each one of us here knows that what has been accomplished is not enough.

The United Nations judgments have been and continue to be subject to frustration, as individual member-states have ignored its pronouncements and disregarded its recommendations. The Organization’s sinews have been weakened, as member-states have shirked their obligations to it. The authority of the Organization has been mocked, as individual member-states have proceeded, in violation of its commands, to pursue their own aims and ends. The troubles which continue to plague us virtually all arise among member states of the Organization, but the Organization remains impotent to enforce acceptable solutions. As the maker and enforcer of the international law, what the United Nations has achieved still falls regrettably short of our goal of an international community of nations.

This does not mean that the United Nations has failed. I have lived too long to cherish many illusions about the essential high mindedness of men when brought into stark confrontation with the issue of control over their security, and their property interests. Not even now, when so much is at hazard would many nations willingly entrust their destinies to other hands.

Yet, this is the ultimatum presented to us: secure the conditions whereby men will entrust their security to a larger entity, or risk annihilation; persuade men that their salvation rests in the subordination of national and local interests to the interests of humanity, or endanger man’s future. These are the objectives, yesterday unobtainable, today essential, which we must labor to achieve.

Until this is accomplished, mankind’s future remains hazardous and permanent peace a matter for speculation. There is no single magic formula, no one simple step, no words, whether written into the Organization’s Charter or into a treaty between states, which can automatically guarantee to us what we seek.Peace is a day-to-day problem, the product of a multitude of events and judgments. Peace is not an “is”, it is a “becoming.”

We cannot escape the dreadful possibility of catastrophe by miscalculation. But we can reach the right decisions on the myriad subordinate problems which each new day poses, and we can thereby make our contribution and perhaps the most that can be reasonably expected of us in 1963 to the preservation of peace. It is here that the United Nations has served us – not perfectly, but well. And in enhancing the possibilities that the Organization may serve us better, we serve and bring closer our most cherished goals.

I would mention briefly today two particular issues which are of deep concern to all men: disarmament and the establishment of true equality among men. Disarmament has become the urgent imperative of our time. I do not say this because I equate the absence of arms to peace, or because I believe that bringing an end to the nuclear arms race automatically guarantees the peace, or because the elimination of nuclear warheads from the arsenals of the world will bring in its wake that change in attitude requisite to the peaceful settlement of disputes between nations. Disarmament is vital today, quite simply, because of the immense destructive capacity of which men dispose.

Ethiopia supports the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty as a step towards this goal, even though only a partial step. Nations can still perfect weapons of mass destruction by underground testing. There is no guarantee against the sudden, unannounced resumption of testing in the atmosphere.

The real significance of the treaty is that it admits of a tacit stalemate between the nations which negotiated it, a stalemate which recognizes the blunt, unavoidable fact that none would emerge from the total destruction which would be the lot of all in a nuclear war, a stalemate which affords us and the United Nations a breathing space in which to act.

Here is our opportunity and our challenge. If the nuclear powers are prepared to declare a truce, let us seize the moment to strengthen the institutions and procedures which will serve as the means for the pacific settlement of disputes among men. Conflicts between nations will continue to arise. The real issue is whether they are to be resolved by force, or by resort to peaceful methods and procedures, administered by impartial institutions. This very Organization itself is the greatest such institution, and it is in a more powerful United Nations that we seek, and it is here that we shall find, the assurance of a peaceful future.

Were a real and effective disarmament achieved and the funds now spent in the arms race devoted to the amelioration of man’s state; were we to concentrate only on the peaceful uses of nuclear knowledge, how vastly and in how short a time might we change the conditions of mankind. This should be our goal.

When we talk of the equality of man, we find, also, a challenge and an opportunity; a challenge to breathe new life into the ideals enshrined in the Charter, an opportunity to bring men closer to freedom and true equality. and thus, closer to a love of peace.

The goal of the equality of man which we seek is the antithesis of the exploitation of one people by another with which the pages of history and in particular those written of the African and Asian continents, speak at such length. Exploitation, thus viewed, has many faces. But whatever guise it assumes, this evil is to be shunned where it does not exist and crushed where it does. It is the sacred duty of this Organization to ensure that the dream of equality is finally realized for all men to whom it is still denied, to guarantee that exploitation is not reincarnated in other forms in places whence it has already been banished.

As a free Africa has emerged during the past decade, a fresh attack has been launched against exploitation, wherever it still exists. And in that interaction so common to history, this in turn, has stimulated and encouraged the remaining dependent peoples to renewed efforts to throw off the yoke which has oppressed them and its claim as their birthright the twin ideals of liberty and equality. This very struggle is a struggle to establish peace, and until victory is assured, that brotherhood and understanding which nourish and give life to peace can be but partial and incomplete.

In the United States of America, the administration of President Kennedy is leading a vigorous attack to eradicate the remaining vestige of racial discrimination from this country. We know that this conflict will be won and that right will triumph. In this time of trial, these efforts should be encouraged and assisted, and we should lend our sympathy and support to the American Government today.

Last May, in Addis Ababa, I convened a meeting of Heads of African States and Governments. In three days, the thirty-two nations represented at that Conference demonstrated to the world that when the will and the determination exist, nations and peoples of diverse backgrounds can and will work together. in unity, to the achievement of common goals and the assurance of that equality and brotherhood which we desire.

On the question of racial discrimination, the Addis Ababa Conference taught, to those who will learn, this further lesson:

The Great Bob Marley used this part of Haile Selassie’s speech below for his hit called “War.”

That until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned: That until there are no longer first-class and second class citizens of any nation. That until the color of a man’s skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes.

That until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race; That until that day, the dream of lasting peace and world citizenship and the rule of international morality will remain but a fleeting illusion, to be pursued but never attained.

And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique and in South Africa in subhuman bondage have been toppled and destroyed; Until bigotry and prejudice and malicious and inhuman self-interest have been replaced by understanding and tolerance and good-will.

Until all Africans stand and speak as free beings, equal in the eyes of all men, as they are in the eyes of Heaven; Until that day, the African continent will not know peace. We Africans will fight, if necessary, and we know that we shall win, as we are confident in the victory of good over evil.

The United Nations has done much, both directly and indirectly to speed the disappearance of discrimination and oppression from the earth. Without the opportunity to focus world opinion on Africa and Asia which this Organization provides, the goal, for many, might still lie ahead, and the struggle would have taken far longer. For this, we are truly grateful.

But more can be done. The basis of racial discrimination and colonialism has been economic, and it is with economic weapons that these evils have been and can be overcome. In pursuance of resolutions adopted at the Addis Ababa Summit Conference, African States have undertaken certain measures in the economic field which, if adopted by all member states of the United Nations, would soon reduce intransigence to reason. I ask, today, for adherence to these measures by every nation represented here which is truly devoted to the principles enunciated in the Charter.

I do not believe that Portugal and South Africa are prepared to commit economic or physical suicide if honorable and reasonable alternatives exist. I believe that such alternatives can be found. But I also know that unless peaceful solutions are devised, counsels of moderation and temperance will avail for naught; and another blow will have been dealt to this Organization which will hamper and weaken still further its usefulness in the struggle to ensure the victory of peace and liberty over the forces of strife and oppression. Here, then, is the opportunity presented to us. We must act while we can, while the occasion exists to exert those legitimate pressures available to us, lest time run out and resort be had to less happy means.

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The late Robert Nester Marley.

Does this Organization today possess the authority and the will to act? And if it does not, are we prepared to clothe it with the power to create and enforce the rule of law? Or is the Charter a mere collection of words, without content and substance, because the essential spirit is lacking? The time in which to ponder these questions is all too short. The pages of history are full of instances in which the unwanted and the shunned nonetheless occurred because men waited to act until too late. We can brook no such delay.

If we are to survive, this Organization must survive. To survive, it must be strengthened. Its executive must be vested with great authority. The means for the enforcement of its decisions must be fortified, and, if they do not exist, they must be devised. Procedures must be established to protect the small and the weak when threatened by the strong and the mighty. All nations which fulfill the conditions of membership must be admitted and allowed to sit in this assemblage.

Equality of representation must be assured in each of its organs. The possibilities which exist in the United Nations to provide the medium whereby the hungry may be fed, the naked clothed, the ignorant instructed, must be seized on and exploited for the flower of peace is not sustained by poverty and want. To achieve this requires courage and confidence. The courage, I believe, we possess. The confidence must be created, and to create confidence we must act courageously.

The great nations of the world would do well to remember that in the modern age even their own fates are not wholly in their hands. Peace demands the united efforts of us all. Who can foresee what spark might ignite the fuse? It is not only the small and the weak who must scrupulously observe their obligations to the United Nations and to each other.

Unless the smaller nations are accorded their proper voice in the settlement of the world’s problems, unless the equality which Africa and Asia have struggled to attain is reflected in expanded membership in the institutions which make up the United Nations, confidence will come just that much harder. Unless the rights of the least of men are as assiduously protected as those of the greatest, the seeds of confidence will fall on barren soil.

The stake of each one of us is identical – life or death. We all wish to live. We all seek a world in which men are freed of the burdens of ignorance, poverty, hunger and disease. And we shall all be hard-pressed to escape the deadly rain of nuclear fall-out should catastrophe overtake us.

When I spoke at Geneva in 1936, there was no precedent for a head of state addressing the League of Nations. I am neither the first, nor will I be the last head of state to address the United Nations, but only I have addressed both the League and this Organization in this capacity. The problems which confront us today are, equally, unprecedented. They have no counterparts in human experience. Men search the pages of history for solutions, for precedents, but there are none.

This, then, is the ultimate challenge. Where are we to look for our survival, for the answers to the questions which have never before been posed? We must look, first, to Almighty God, Who has raised man above the animals and endowed him with intelligence and reason. We must put our faith in Him, that He will not desert us or permit us to destroy humanity which He created in His image. And we must look into ourselves, into the depth of our souls.

We must become something we have never been and for which our education and experience and environment have ill-prepared us. We must become bigger than we have been: more courageous, greater in spirit, larger in outlook. We must become members of a new race, overcoming petty prejudice, owing our ultimate allegiance not to nations but to our fellow men within the human community.”

Oct. 6, 1963

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Bob Marley sings ‘War’ below. Taken from the album Rastaman Vibration.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XHEPoMNP0I

Ivorian Reggae Star, Alpha Blondy, didn’t only recorded his album ‘JERUSALEM’ with Bob Marley’s group, ‘The Wailers’ but also inspired by Bob Marley’s ‘War’ song, Alpha Blondy recorded the French version of the song.

From Alamo

Alpha Blondy, recorded the French version of Bob Marley’s ‘War.’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEnEcFXuEXk

Who says Rastafarians worship Haile Selassie? Rastafarians worship only JAH, the living God, but revere and hold Haile Selassie in high esteem. Haile Selassie known as Ras Tafari, originates from the descendants of King David and has inspired the Rasta movement today.

Interested in Reggae music? Read Joel Savage’s “The Passion of Reggae And African Music,” and to know the life and music of great artists behind the reggae music.

Passion Paint 2

http://www.amazon.com/The-Passion-Reggae-African-Music/dp/1621373487

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Joel Savage interviews the great Joseph Hill of the group called ‘CULTURE.’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interview With South Africa Reggae Legend: Lucky Dube

Lucky JoeThe author, Joel Savage interviews Lucky Dube

“THE FALL OF APARTHEID, I KNOW I AM PART OF IT IN SOME WAYS”- LUCKY DUBE”

“Reggae in the bathroom, Reggae in the bedroom, Reggae everywhere, Reggae in jail, Reggae in church, everybody likes it,” sings Lucky Dube. In this book the writer speaks to some of the masters behind contemporary reggae and African music.

“The fall of Apartheid, I know I’m part of it in some ways,” says Lucky Dube. “Definitely, my father was my biggest influence in music,” says Andrew Tosh.

The influence and impact of these great musicians is internationally known and is recounted with warm, sincere, and unrivaled craftsmanship that distinguishes them in the music world.

Read the live performances and interviews of: Anthony B, Joseph Hill-Culture, Gregory Isaacs, U-Roy, Capleton, Julian Marley, Prince Malachi, Luciano, Lucky Dube, Julian Murvin, Andrew Tosh, ASWAD, Live Wyya, Seun Kuti, Femi Kuti, Faytinga, Manu Dibango, and Tutu Poane.

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Lucky Dube

This beautifully illustrated, color photo book is one of the most fascinating and interesting works ever written about reggae and African music. Read the interview I had with the great reggae star, Lucky Dube, in this interesting book. Price of the E-copy version of the book slashed and reduced for reggae lovers to afford.

http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ

Face To Face With The Great Joseph Hill Of The Group Called Culture

Culture was one of Jamaica's best reggae groups

Joel Savage interviews Reggae legend Joseph Hill of Culture

Down in Jamaica, where Garvey comes from many groups and musicians started in the early seventies like the mighty Joseph Hill. But they are nowhere to be found today. Like the spirit of the Lord is upon Joseph Hill, for the past thirty years, nothing at all could stop him from spreading his message against war, oppression, crime, discrimination, poverty, racism, corruption, and injustice.

In the year 2003, he came out with “world peace” album seeking peace worldwide and rejecting war totally. On July 25, 2004, after performing live, he granted this interview to The Voice Magazine Belgian Correspondent.

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Joel: I have to call you Sir Joseph Hill. Let’s rally round Jehovah’s throne. I have some few questions to ask you today.

Joseph: You are welcome. (Then he smiled)

Joel: It was in the seventies, I heard of Culture. Can you please tell what has inspired you to be in this hard music industry for all these years?

Joseph: It’s Jah (referring to God) that gives me the strength. Always feel that there is something in watch out. For myself, I love to play for the people. They are also part of my inspiration. These are what have inspired me throughout these years.

Joel: You have been singing all you life about corruption, oppression, war, poverty, discrimination, crime and so on. Were you a victim to such things in any circumstances?

Joseph: There are people I saw in comparison to various countries. Yes!yes!!yes!!! I have seen people die and not a word of justice is been said. Think of the person’s life. It is priceless. My last grief I had. There was this woman in Afghanistan, separated from the land. They treated her so bad that she and her child were eating grass.”G R A S S- grass”.(Joseph moved with sorrow spelt the word grass)

Joel: Your lyrics and beats in every song of Culture, touches and moves everyone on the road of trials and tribulations. Where do you get such wonderful rhythms and lyrics from?

Joseph: The big man that rules the earth. He is the governor.(He laughed)

Joel: You were in Sierra Leone, when the war was at its peak, with brutal activities of the rebels. Did your visit created any impact or brought a change to the suffering masses?

Joseph: Yes, my visit brought a change. When the people saw me, they don’t know what to say. They just cried and cried. You know the rebels told the government that “You should be glad that Joseph is here. If you he wasn’t here this place would be destroyed within 24 hours. Imagine. I just came back from there a few weeks ago”

Joel: I learnt that at the capital Freetown, at the guest house you lodged, there is a tree nearby, and every morning a bird came to sing, and out of the song of the bird, you composed a song from it.

Joseph: Yes’ yes!! It is true.
Joel:On July 4th, 2004, I interviewed Lucky Dube, he told me that as a friend, you are one of the best men in the music industry. How do you react to this nice compliment?
Joseph: I take is easy. That’s all.

TV: I ask the same question any reggae artist I interview. Reggae music is loved by everyone. But why is it that the music is given less attention?

Joseph: Because the truth is God’s friend. But not a lot of people are the friend of the truth.

Joel: You are following the Palestinians and Israeli conflict for a very long time and have even-even visited the Gaza strip. Who do you think is the stumbling block to this peace everyone is seeking?

Joseph; Greed, greed, greed. Because there is enough to satisfy every man’s need but never enough to satisfy no man’s greed. So greed is the stumbling block.

Joel: In one of your music, you played a song against Yasser Arafat, as the stumbling block.

Joseph: He made himself like that. He has to change his ways and the other man would change his ways. There is something called “Repentance”. When repentance meets their hearts, we shall have a beautiful world.

Joel: You successfully came out last year with the remarkable “world peace” album. What message do you still have in mind for your numerous fans worldwide?

Joseph: You know people should respect one another. To be used, abused, refused and our hearts trampled by fear and living in doubt, thinking we are living on top of the world. No, we shouldn’t live that way. We have to seek happiness, love, mutual respect, joy and justice of God around us, and peace would find its rightful place.

Joel: Thank you very much for this interview Sir Joseph Hill.

Joseph: Thanks be to Jah

Read other interviews of Anthony B, Andrew Tosh, U-Roy, Prince Malachi, Julian Marley, ASWAD, Femi Kuti, Seun Kuti, Tutu Puoane and many others in ‘The Passion of Reggae and African Music.

Passion Paint 2

http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ