“Life Is Very Hard. The Only People Who Really Live Are Those Who Are Harder Than Life Itself.”

Zero 4

There are hundreds of definitions about ‘Life,’ but none gives me its true meaning, than this quote by author Nawal El Salaawi, “Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”  But who is this woman?

Nawal El Saadiaw has been pilloried, censored, imprisoned and exiled for her refusal to accept the oppression imposed on women by gender and class.

In her life and in her writings, this struggle against sexual discrimination has always been linked to a struggle against all forms of oppression: religious, racial, colonial and neo-colonial.

In 1969, she published her first work of non-fiction, Women and Sex ; in 1972, her writings and her struggles led to her dismissal from her job.

From then on there was no respite; imprisonment under Sadat in 1981 was the culmination of the long war she had fought for Egyptian women’s social and intellectual freedom. A Daughter of Isis is the autobiography of this extraordinary woman.

Author Nawal El Salaawi

Zero 5Nawal El Saadawi, also spelled Nawāl al-Saʿdāwī   (born Oct. 27, 1931, Kafr Ṭaḥlah, Egypt), Egyptian public health physician, psychiatrist, author, and advocate of women’s rights. Sometimes described as “the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab world,” El Saadawi was a feminist whose writings and professional career were dedicated to political and sexual rights for women.El Saadawi was educated at Cairo University (M.D., 1955), Columbia University in New York (M.P.H., 1966), and ʿAyn Shams University in Cairo (where she performed psychiatric research in 1972–74). In 1955–65 she worked as a physician at Cairo University and in the Egyptian ministry of health, and in 1966 she became the director-general of the health education department within the ministry.

In 1968 she founded Health magazine, which was shut down by Egyptian authorities several years later, and in 1972 she was expelled from her professional position in the ministry of health because of her book Al-marʾah wa al-jins (1969; Women and Sex), which was condemned by religious and political authorities.

El Saadawi was jailed in September 1981, and during the two months of her imprisonment she wrote Mudhakkirāt fī sijn al-nisāʾ (1984; Memoirs from the Women’s Prison) on a roll of toilet paper using a smuggled cosmetic pencil.

In 1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and religious opponents, including accusations of apostasy.

In 2002 a legal attempt was made by an Islamist lawyer to forcibly divorce her from her husband, and in May 2008 she won a case that had been brought against her by al-Azhar University, the major centre of Islamic learning, that included charges of apostasy and heresy.

El Saadawi’s novels, short stories, and nonfiction deal chiefly with the status of Arab women, as inMudhakkirāt tabībah (1960; Memoirs of a Woman Doctor), Al-khayt wa al-jidār (1972; The Thread and the Wall), Al-wajh al-ʿarī lī al-marʾah al-arabiyyah (1977; The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World), Al-ḥubb fī zaman al-nafṭ (1993; Love in the Kingdom of Oil), and Al-riwāyah (2004; The Novel).

The oppression of women by men through religion is the underlying theme of El Saadawi’s novel set in a mental institution, Jannāt wa Iblīs (1992; Jannāt and Iblīs). The female protagonists are Jannāt, whose name is the plural of the Arabic word for paradise, and Iblīs, whose name refers to the devil.

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The Devil Among Us In The Likely Of Men

handsUnited we stand, divided we fall.

Racial discrimination, violence and crime, are some of the problems that have divided, caused havoc and brought unrest in our society today, yet many don’t learn  from the painful experience, destruction and the mistakes they do.

No body wants to be called a racist. “The black man say it’s the white man, The white man say it’s the black man, Indians say it’s the coloureds, Coloureds say it’s everyone…….” Sings Lucky Dube, the great South African reggae legend.

In one of the shops in Antwerp, an African dog lover,went to buy a dog’s chain. After payment, as soon as he stepped outside, a white man entering the same shop, saw him with the chain. He asked the African if he is going to use the chain on his neck. What a provocation?  I quickly stepped in to hold the angry African, when the scene nearly turned to bloodshed.

That is how life goes sometimes. The poor African is not looking for trouble but the devil is knocking on his door to give him one. The white man knows very well that such question could bring unexpected problems, yet he ignored and did what his heart wants. And if you called him a racist, he will tell you “I’m not.”

At the just concluded Flemish Journalist Association end of year’s press conference on December 5, 2015, in Antwerp, I witnessed something more shocking. Among all the Belgian journalists, were only two Africans. A white male came to the other African, a radio journalist and asked him if he knows what monkeys eat.

“I don’t know.” He answered. “Then follow me.” Said the Belgian journalist. The radio journalist followed him, without knowing whether it was a joke, game or racial discrimination.

To his utmost surpise, he was taken to table with a bowl of fruits, including banana. He just smiled and left the Belgian journalist standing by the table. Why should something like that happen among a group of journalists in the same association? This is an insult not intelligence.

Many times the black man is seen as a criminal in the society, because of the colour of his skin, but crime doesn’t know colour. Both black and white commit crime. If you hate someone bcause of his colour, please just leave him alone. Don’t try to stir racial violence, because when trouble erupts, it affects everyone including children, our business and the society.

10 Reasons Racism Has Never Been An Issue Of Concern To Me

All we need is love

Love conquers everything, so that’s what we need for a healthy society.

Racism is the belief that a particular race is superior or inferior to another, that a person’s social and moral traits are predetermined by his or her inborn biological characteristics. Racial separatism is the belief, most of the time based on racism, that different races should remain segregated and apart from one another.

This evil ideology or belief has caused bloodshed, unrest, and death in our society and still continue to tear our society apart today. Churches and organizations continue to discourage racism and strengthen relationships without success. In the world of racism, the Black man is the one that suffers most and being discriminated against, yet no one wants to be called a racist. Below are ten reasons I don’t care much about racism, even though I feel sorry for victims of racism.

  1. Racism is a chronic incurable disease, which can’t be cured or eliminated but can be reduced.
  2. Tribalism is a form of racism in Africa, the reason in Nigeria, the Yoruba hates the Ebo.
  3. In Ghana, the Gas hates the Fantes.
  4. In Sierra Leone, the Mende hates the Temni.
  5. In America, African-Americans draw guns at each other, killing and slashing their own brothers’ throat.  Why do they complain about racism, when they hate themselves?
  6. Head of churches and government officials secretly support racism.
  7. In Rwanda, the Hutu hates Tutsi.
  8. The black man has completely lost his identity through slavery. That identity can never be recovered.
  9. Many African-Americans have neglected Africa and even hate to be referred to as Africans. Being proud of where they came from and showing love, will give them the love and respect they deserve. Above all, there are black racists too.
  10. Children are not born racists. Adults continue to teach them at home and in schools, so racism will never come to an end.

Taking the above reasons into consideration, it is a total waste of time to spend hours worrying about racism or an incurable disease. I think this is the reason Sebb Blatter said, racism in football should be ignored and settled with a handshake.

Let Love Be Your Identity Without Hypocrisy

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A depressed teenager

Do you know that your little kindness can completely change the life of someone? The hope of many is gradually fading. They don’t feel secure anymore and the love they are looking for, is nowhere is near. Many stay in bed for hours, yet they can’t sleep, because they lack love and good friends.

Having friends they say is good, but there are good and bad friends. Friendship sometimes burns like acid, giving you the feeling of leaving this wicked world, all because there is no love and if there is, it’s never genuine.  All over the world, including America, there are racial problems, because there is no love.

Is the Bible the best book to read? Yes! it is, but many don’t see it that way, yet the uncountable prophesies are taking place. “They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.” Yes! it is taking place right now.

Where is the love that everyone needs? Where is the love which can heal the world? Where is the love that is not sold but is the most ‘expensive’ thing to get from humans? Now I know the reason Jesus said: “Love thy neighbour as thyself.” But who is our neighbour? We are the neighbours, meaning love must be part of us until the end of our lives.

We live now live in a world most people do not have compassion. Many are cruel, love violence, and have no love for their neighbour. I don’t need to be black, white, Chinese or Indian before you love me. In this cruel world, money, wealth, luxury and friends can’t make one happy. All that we need is peace and love.

Love 3

A depressed child

Let love be your identity where ever you go. Let love be radiant in your life to reflect on others. Let genuine love be the key to your life to open the doors to those that need happiness, food, and shelter. Let your love bring back those spiritually dead without hope back to life.

Let your love take away the depression, frustration, and loneliness of someone facing the hard reality of life.  Open the door for someone so that you could see his or smile. Bring sunshine in the life of one who feels darkness always around him and your reward will overflow its banks.

Between The World And Me

WORLD

A bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer)

“This is your country, this is your world, this is your body, and you must find some way to live within the all of it.”
 

In the one hundred fifty years since the end of the Civil War and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, the story of race and America has remained a brutally simple one, written on flesh: It is the story of the black body, exploited to create the country’s foundational wealth, violently segregated to unite a nation after a civil war, and, today, still disproportionately threatened, locked up, and killed in our streets.

What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all—regardless of race—honestly reckon with our country’s fraught racial history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer those questions, presented in the form of a letter to his adolescent son.

Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his own awakening to the truth about history and race through a series of revelatory experiences: immersion in nationalist mythology as a child; engagement with history, poetry, and love at Howard University; travels to Civil War battlefields and the South Side of Chicago; a journey to France that reorients his sense of the world; and pilgrimages to the homes of mothers whose children’s lives have been taken as American plunder.

Taken together, these stories map a winding path toward a kind of liberation—a journey from fear and confusion to a full and honest understanding of the world as it is. Masterfully woven from lyrical personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me offers a powerful new framework for understanding America’s history and current crisis, and a transcendent vision for a way forward.

The Author

Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a former staff writer at The Village Voice and Time and has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and numerous other publications. Coates has authored a memoir: The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons and an Unlikely Road to Manhood, and runs a blog, Ta-Nehisi News, which was named one of Time magazine’s Best Blogs of 2011. He lives in New York City.

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