The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks

Life 4

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. 

Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

The Author

BEC 2

Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; Discover; and others. She has worked as a correspondent for NPR’s Radiolab and PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW, and is a contributing editor at Popular Science magazine and guest editor of The Best American Science Writing 2011.
               She is a former Vice President of the National Book Critics Circle and has taught creative nonfiction and science journalism at the University of Memphis, the University of Pittsburgh, and New York University. Her debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, took more than ten years to research and write, and became an instant New York Times bestseller.
                She has been featured on numerous television shows, including CBS Sunday Morning and The Colbert Report. Her book has received widespread critical acclaim, with reviews appearing in The New Yorker, Washington Post, Science, Entertainment Weekly, People, and many others.
                It won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and was named The Best Book of 2010 by Amazon.com, and a Best Book of the Year by Entertainment Weekly; O, The Oprah Magazine; The New York Times; Washington Post; US News & World Report; and numerous others.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is being translated into more than twenty languages, and adapted into a young adult book, and an HBO film produced by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball. Skloot lives in Chicago but regularly abandons city life to write in the hills of West Virginia, where she tends to find stray animals and bring them home.

She travels extensively to speak about her book. For more information, visit RebeccaSkloot.com, where you will find book special features, including photos and videos, as well as her book tour schedule, and links to follow her and The Immortal Life on Twitter and Facebook.
Advertisements

Hitler’s Evil Plan Couldn’t Stop Blacks Integration In Europe

History 2

The logic behind the hate of the black man is about something he has, which can’t be found in any race.

Colonial soldier with German women, 1919. In the period following World War I, French colonial troops were used as part of the Allied occupation of the German Rhineland, in accordance with the Treaty of Versailles. Hitler wrote about the Black Shame in Mein Kampf, decrying the “negrification” of Europe. His government would later sterilize 500 or so mixed-race children born of African servicemen and German women (the so-called “Rhineland Bastards”)
9d

Poetry Enriches The Human Soul, As It Nurtures Love

rainbowBy Walter William Safar

Poetry enriches the human soul, as it nurtures love, compassion, freedom and faith in people. I don’t know much about victories, but I am sure of one thing, that compassion is a victory of the human spirit. Yes, I consider myself to be lucky to share my poetry with everyone regardless of race or religion, because anyone’s tears are the same color, as well as an honest smile.

There is hope in me that you shall become my brothers in art, in terms of literature and compassion. Let it be the beginning of a wonderful friendship that shall be linked through small mercies. As William Wordsworth put it beautifully: “The best portion of a good man’s life is his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and of love.”

(Those who divide poets into amateurs and professionals are wrong, because poetry is not a profession, but a state of mind-state of soul… Each verse that brings tears to someone’s eyes remains in memory, and the wise Jean Paul said: Our memories are the only paradise from which we can never be expelled.)

A man’s heart is small, but it is surrounded by the immensity of its soul. Sometimes our words may appear silent, but they are certainly heading for infinity.

Read Walter William Safar’s

THE LAND BEYOND THE RAINBOW

You are calling me, road of dreams,
To a land beyond the rainbow,
In which diversity is the harmony of living,
In which hatred is losing the battle against love,
In which a strong spirit is virtue instead of weakness;

You are calling me, road of dreams,
To where reality is conceived from thousands,
Tens of thousands of dreams,
Dreams that feed the soul,
Dreams that nurture the hearts of
Dreamers from all over the world;

You are calling me, road of dreams,
To a wonderful land of dreamers,
But I am tired,
My mornings are different now,
Full of extinguished sparks,
And the scents of weary nights
That lay beside you now,
Just like night birds,
Your weary wanderers,
Whose passion bled
Into life’s inexhaustible well.

Continue reading: http://www.akademija-art.hr/pano/walter-william-safar/34388-the-land-beyond-the-rainbow

“Never Lose Sight Of Your Goal And Never Give Up”- Calvin Coolidge

Calvin 2There are certain quotes that inspire us, make us feel alright when we are down, and strengthens us when we are weak.  This is great quote by Calvin Coolidge, the 30th president of United States of America.        

“Never lose sight of your goal and never give up. Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan, ‘press on’ has solved, and always will solve, the problems of the human race.” 

Color struck: America’s White Jesus Is A Global Export And false Product

Article By Wesley Muhammad, PhD.

What color was Jesus? Most American Christians—Black and White—would dismiss this question as both irrelevant and unanswerable as the Gospels fail to give us a physical description. The irony is that most of these same Americans in their heart of hearts are pretty confident any way that they know what color Jesus was. They attend churches with images of a tall, long haired, full bearded White man depicted in stained glass windows or painted on walls, and they return home to the same depictions framed in their living room or illustrating their family Bibles.

Further compounding the irony is the fact that America actually has an obsession with the (presumed) color of Christ and has exported her White Americanized Savior around the world, as recently documented by Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey in their book, The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America (2012).

In fact, the world’s most popular and recognizable image of Christ is a distinctly 19th-20th century American creation. It is true that versions of the “White Christ” appear in European art as early as the 4th century of the Christian era, but these images coexisted with other, nonwhite representations throughout European history. The popularity of the cult of the Black Madonna and Black Christ throughout Europe is evidence of the fact that the European ‘White Christs’ never acquired the authority and authenticity that the White Christ now has globally. This Christ and his authority are American phenomena. As a predominantly Protestant nation Early America rejected the imaging of Christ that characterized European Catholicism.

By the mid-19th century, however, in response to American expansion, splintering during the Civil War and subsequent reconstructing, “Whiteness” took on a new significance and a newly- empowered “White Jesus” rose to prominence as the sanctifying symbol of a new national unity and power. As Blum and Harvey observe:

“By wrapping itself with the alleged form of Jesus, whiteness gave itself a holy face … With Jesus as white, Americans could feel that sacred whiteness stretched back in time thousands of years and forward in sacred space to heaven and the second coming … The white Jesus promised a white past, a white present, and a future of white glory.”

As America rose to superpower status in the 20th century she became the world’s leading producer and global exporter of White Jesus imagery through film, art, American business, and Christian missions, and has thereby defined the world’s view of the Son of God. This globally recognizable Jesus is a totally American product. Indeed, he is an American. Warner Sallman’s iconic image of Jesus called Head of Christ (1941) became the most widely reproduced piece of artwork in world history and its depiction the most recognizable face of Jesus in the world.

By the 1990’s it had been printed over 500 million times and achieved global iconic status. With smooth white skin, long, flowing blondish-brown hair, long beard and blue eyes, this Nordic Christ consciously disguised any hint of Jesus’s Semitic, oriental origin—and departed from the older European depictions. It both shaped and was shaped by emerging American ideas of whiteness. The beloved White Jesus of today’s world was Made in America.

What, then, did Jesus actually look like? Despite the absence of a detailed description of Jesus’s physical appearance in the Gospels (though John the Revelator saw the risen Christ apparently with wooly hair and black feet, Rev. 1:14-15), there are non-biblical evidences that actually allow us to visualize the Son of God from Nazareth.

Revelation 1:14-15 – King James Version (KJV)

14) His head and his hairs were white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes were as a flame of fire;

15) And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters.

The first century Jewish writer Josephus (37-100 AD) penned the earliest non-biblical testimony of Jesus. He reportedly had access to official Roman records on which he based his information and in his work Halosis or the “Capture (of Jerusalem),” written around 72 A.D., Josephus discussed “the human form of Jesus and his wonderful works.” Unfortunately his texts have passed through Christian hands which altered them, removing offensive material. Fortunately, however, Biblical scholar Robert Eisler in a classic 1931 study of Josephus’ Testimony was able to reconstruct the unaltered testimony based on a newly-discovered Old Russian translation that preserved the original Greek text. According to Eisler’s reconstruction, the oldest non-Biblical description of Jesus read as follows:

“At that time also there appeared a certain man of magic power … if it be meet to call him a man, [whose name is Jesus], whom [certain] Greeks call a son of [a] God, but his disciples [call] the true prophet … he was a man of simple appearance, mature age, black-skinned (melagchrous), short growth, three cubits tall, hunchbacked, prognathous (lit. ‘with a long face’ [macroprosopos]), a long nose, eyebrows meeting above the nose … with scanty [curly] hair, but having a line in the middle of the head after the fashion of the Nazaraeans, with an undeveloped beard.”

This short, black-skinned, mature, hunchbacked Jesus with a unibrow, short curly hair and undeveloped beard bears no resemblance to the Jesus Christ taken for granted today by most of the Christian world: the tall, long haired, long bearded, white-skinned and blue eyed Son of God. Yet, this earliest textual record matches well the earliest iconographic evidence.

The earliest visual depiction of Jesus is a painting found in 1921 on a wall of the baptismal chamber of the house-church at Dura Europos, Syria and dated around 235 A.D. The Jesus that is “Healing the Paralytic Man” (Mark 2:1-12) is short and dark-skinned with a small curly afro – see below.

This description has now been supported by the new science of forensic anthropology. In 2002 British forensic scientists and Israeli archaeologists reconstructed what they believe is the most accurate image of Jesus based off of data obtained from the multi-disciplinary approach. In December 2002 Popular Science Magazine published a cover story on the findings which confirm that Jesus would have been short, around 5”1’, hair “short with tight curls,” a weather-beaten face “which would have made him appear older,” dark eyes and complexion: “he probably looked a great deal more like a dark-skinned Semite than Westerners are used to seeing,” they concluded. The textual, visual, and scientific evidence agrees, then: Jesus likely was a short, dark-skinned Semite with short curly hair and dark eyes.

Colossians 1:15 describes Christ as the “image of the unseen God” and in the Gospel of John (12:45; 14:9) Jesus declares that whoever sees him has seen God. What Jesus “looks like” then is not irrelevant as it is in some way a pointer to God Himself.

Why Many Fear The Dead When They Can’t Harm Us?

Image 2Death is inevitable. It happens to everyone, without taking race, gender, age, religion, or status into consideration. Death is an enemy which has conquered and keeps on conquering, taking away the happiness of everyone when it strikes. “For the living knows that they will die; but the dead know nothing, their love, their hatred, and their envy have now perished,” says the Bible at (Ecclesiastes 9:5)

Paranormal stories reveal the existence of restless spirits or ghosts, haunting places of abode and people, but I haven’t heard of a dead body harming anyone. Why then most people fear a dead body? The only way to determine if the dead can harm someone is to sleep at a graveyard till morning or stay with a dead body in a room alone. Believe me; you will have a peaceful union with the dead body than taking the risk to pass through a violent community.

On ‘Youtube’ are hundreds of pranks involving dead bodies. Some are very hilarious that one never stops laughing after watching them. I wonder why people risk their lives fleeing across the road, because a man stops a vehicle and tries to deposit the body of someone pretending to be dead. If the dead has no power at all to hurt someone, why the need to fear the dead instead of the living?

Some people were born naturally cruel. They kill for pleasure. Your friends can hurt you and make feel miserable like a church mouse. People invade your property, steal your belongings. Injustice, corruption, discrimination, racism, terrorism, child abuse, crime and violence everywhere, are caused by the living. The dead has got nothing to do with this. In fact the dead sometimes becomes victim of crime and injustice.

Ghouls get to graveyards to steal jewels, ornaments and expensive items buried with the dead, especially those who follow traditions of the royal family. Many enjoy making fortune out of people’s misery and tragedy. Aftermath of the Malaysia Airlines MH17, which was shot down recently in eastern Ukraine, some looters were at the site to steal money and credit cards, living at the expense of the dead.

Would you continue living in fear because of the dead when they have no power to harm you? The source of all our fear comes from our own uncontrolled minds. The mind is obsessed with fear to the extent that sometimes one flees when no one is after him and mostly flees from safety to danger. Life is beautiful; while we are part of this generation we mustn’t hurt our psychological emotions with unnecessary fears.

Tears, Assurance And Consolation

African 4

 

David Newton, a classically trained sculptor in the European tradition, has dedicated his career to transforming ordinary African-American people and forgotten historical moments into unforgettable, timeless monuments of beauty.

Tears, Assurance And Consolation

Anguish and torment have taken over their souls

Psychologically and physically scarred, they seek comfort

The soul is willing to forgive but the mind finds it hard to forget

Because the scar is like an image hanging on the wall

My heart believes there is God, yet I try to find out if Africans have God

I want to know why so much pain?

Why so much tears from my eyes?

Why a particular race should pass through such a rough road?

Do I have to believe that God created man in his own image?

As the moon unravels wonders

I will take the opportunity to free my mind

The shackles are already removed from my feet

I heard the voice calling and saying trust in Jesus

His blessings, no money can buy and no one can steal from you.

Short poem written by Joel Savage@Copyright/ 11/3/2015.