J.N.K. Savage:Tracing The Works Of A Great Journalist Behind Computer Age

SAV 6Journalist/Documentary film Producer and Director Justin N.K. Savage and wife Nancy-Elizabeth Savage (Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson) You looking at my mother and father.

Justin Nobleman Kodwo Savage was a professional journalist, documentary film producer and director, born at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana in 1932. While in active service, he passed away on January 29, 1976.

At Guinea Press, now ‘The Ghanaian Times’ during the Kwame Nkrumah era, Mr. Savage travelled extensively across the globe, whenever the president leaves the country to participate in world affairs.

At home, Ghanaians were able to receive first-hand information from Mr. Savage, over Nkrumah’s trip overseas, appearing in ‘The Evening News,’ newspaper dominated by party news, CPP, and adulation of Nkrumah.

At Guinea Press, Justin Savage had the opportunity to make further studies in journalism in London, England, but Nkrumah’s interest in communism took him off Ghana soil to many Eastern European countries including Poland, Czechoslovakia etc, and Russia.

In the sixties, the president of the then Czechoslovakia invited African journalists to his country. Justin Savage heads the African journalists from Ghana, but the Ghanaians presence stole the show, because of the native Kente cloth they put on. Kente exposes the rich tradition and culture of Ghana.

Justin Savage filed his press cuts and combined all his publications which appeared in the newspapers as a magazine, naming it “A Mixture Of Periodicals.” These publications later after his death, became my favourite book, assisting me to gain more writing skills when my interest increased to be a writer.

Darkness fell on Ghana when Nkrumah was overthrown-ed on February 24, 1966, in a coup organized by CIA and local collaborators. Chaos and curfews followed amidst jubilation and sadness. Mr. Savage served Guinea press a year more and he resigned.

He followed a course in technology at the Kumasi Science and Technology, where he studied film production. After his course, he entered into Ghana Broadcasting Corporation as ‘Advisor on film for television.’

He excelled in his profession and had promotions. It wasn’t long when Friedrich Ebert Foundation (West German Television Team) established a television project attached to the Broadcasting House in Ghana.

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung is a German political foundation named after Friedrich Ebert, Germany’s first democratically elected president. Headquartered in Bonn and Berlin, the foundation contributes to social democracy by means of:

Political education in order to reinforce its fundamental values, research and scientific analysis of central policy areas, various forms of public dialogue in order to pave the way for it, scholarship programs for students and Ph.D. candidates, development cooperation aimed at global justice and building bridges of international cooperation for worldwide democracy.

For efficient service and to be familiar with new developments in television production, Mr. Savage was at West German for an intensive course. He returned to the Broadcasting House and was appointed ‘Documentary Film Producer and Director.

At the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, he made a number of documentary films, especially during the exhibition of Ghana and other African products at both the first and second ‘Ghana International Trade Fair,’ in Accra.

Kodwo, the name his co-workers loved to call him, did a number of documentary films, including ‘Ghana At A Glance, Cocoa In Ghana, Backyard Industries and ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced in 1972. I had the opportunity to play a role in ‘Backyard Industries.’

I grew up to see some of his friends such as Mr. Kofi Badu, the Managing Director of Daily Graphic and Mr. Willie Donkor, the Editor of Weekly Spectator, still in the media. In the early nineties, January, I contacted one of my father’s friends called Mr. Ebo Biney, at the Broadcasting House, requesting if he could telecast one of my father’s film on January 29, for remembrance. It came as a shock to me when I learned that all my father’s films got burnt, following a fire which engulfed Ghana Broadcasting Corporation some time ago.

Since then I have been working very hard to see if I can find any of my father’s work online, despite far behind computer age or advanced modern technology. Like winning a lotto, I discovered two. The first is at the website of Len Pole, a Museum Consultant: “Advisor on a film for television, ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced by Kodwo Savage, Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.” – http://www.lenpole.com/I contacted the museum consultant after the discovery of my father’s work on his website. I was delighted when he told a few years ago ‘Furnace in a village’ was shown at Cannes Film Festival.

Then I had a new break through  when I discovered another work at: Selected Bibliography in Communication – jstor by Graham B. Kerr, under the topic- All African governments are committed to development and most wish to …Journalism Quarterly [forthcoming]. ….. SAVAGEJ.N.K. “Ghana Jugend begeistert.- . “Ghana inspires youth.”

The selected Bibliography in Communication is a book published by the Canadian Association of African Studies. Justin Savage writes:

“We must bridge the gap between leaders and masses, between government and people . . No government tells the people everything, but every government must reach the people so as to tell them what they should be told” – Julius Nyerere

Continue reading: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/483601.pdf?

The search for my father’s work isn’t yet over. As time goes on when I discover something new, I will keep on updating this article. I hope readers will enjoy reading it and if any reader has any suggestion to improve it, you are always welcome.

The incredible story of this great writer neglected when he was a child is now available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Writer-Died-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L54A7O

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Africa: Destroyed By The Gods

Ako 3My motivations for writing this book came from the pain I feel when I see the havoc foreign religions have wrought on Africa, especially in the last three decades. Traditionally, Africans are a deeply spiritual people. It is sad and painful to see how our deep spirituality was used to turn us into unthinking zombies.

It appears like the African elite, by which we mean the political as well as the spiritual elite, are in cahoots to keep the people in perpetual ignorance. Some ideals the European Missionaries preached, like “Love thy neighbour,” are not ideals they were prepared to abide by. They served to transform our conquerors into saviours to worship. Sadly, these are the same ideals our pastors today use to render us into unthinking masses of simpletons, so that they and the political elite can continue to loot our national resources.

By successfully turning themselves into ‘men-of-god,’ the priests transformed themselves into venerable agents of the creator, so it’d be sacrilegious to question or attack them. An important question we need to ask ourselves as Africans is what single benefit we have achieved with all the prayers, holy retreats and the burning of candles we have engaged in over the years. We also need to ask the pastors and the archbishops why they are not prepared to wait for their own paradise in afterlife.

Although we did not set out to write a comprehensive critique of the Christian religion, we show enough evidence to demonstrate that it was a religion deliberately founded on fraud. There are abundant historical records to show that the central figure of Christianity, Jeshua or Jesus, was a Roman invention; he never exist as a historical person. There is abundant evidence to show that the book the Christians called the Holy Bible were collections of ancient fables gathered by wandering habirus (Hebrews), and that they are not accurate historical narratives. Many of them were consciously forged stories.

The records are in the public domain to show that the books that made up the Bible were selected at the First Council of Nicaea, convened by one of the most murderous of Popes, Constantine, in AD 325. Also in the public records is how the King James Version of the Bible was put together at the urgings of one of the worst killers to grace the English throne, King James. My sadness at the havoc the Christian religion wrought compelled me to start writing about it.

I hope that my struggle will propel other honest Africans to begin to challenge the false preaching of the Christians and, hopefully, regain some of our African patrimony before they are totally destroyed by the lies the Christians peddle. We Africans need only to sit and do some thinking. If, as almost every scientist today knows, we are the first people on earth, how do we end up worshipping a Semite god? Another question we ought to ask ourselves is why is it that we are the only people that do not worship a god in our own image and in our own language? Apart from Africans, every society creates its own god in its own image.

This is not a complete evaluation of the Christian religion, but we provide enough materials for the honest investigator to search for and find the truth. We provide enough proof and suggestions to make the honest Africa do his own study, and discover that, contrary to what his pastor says, the Bible is not a correct historical document. On these pages, I set forth my views on the Christian religion. I urge that they be read in the same honest spirit they were written.

The Author

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Femi Akomolafe is a Nigerian writer, author and a television producer.  A passionate Pan-Africanist, he writes as a columnist for the Accra-based Daily Dispatch newspaper. The globetrotter Femi lives in both Europe and Africa.

His extensive work reflects on Africa-related issues in his books and for various newspapers and magazines. He was the producer of the FOCUS ON AFRICANS TV Interview programme for the MultiTV Station.

He is also the CEO of Alaye Dot Biz Limited Dot Biz, a Kasoa-based Multimedia organisation that specializes in Audio and Video Production. Despite his busy activities, Femi always has time for his family.

http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Femi-Akomolafe/e/B00MCZ00G0/

UNDER THE DOWNPOUR: Oil Painting On Canvas By Leonid Afremov

DownpourColorful portrait painting – modern way to decorate your room

When we hear the word portrait, we imagine magnificent pictures of historical figures painted centuries ago. Keeping the noble face of a glorified political leader or great musician alive for future generations used to be the main goal of this genre – but not anymore. In our times, artists like Leonid Afremov try to find inspiration in everyday life.

An unintentionally observed scene, two strange girls in the street, a common situation repeating itself over and over again as long as the world exists – but the artist’s vivid imagination is capable of depicting it in fantastically bright colors and making it meaningful and dear to our hearts. Light up your room with this cheerful portrait painting sparkling with all shades of the spectrum!

Friendship under umbrella

It’s no secret that Leonid Afremov is fascinated by the rain. But we can rarely see it so bright and vigorous on his paintings! The rain is falling down in colorful streams painted with quick large strokes densely covering the entire canvas. Surrounded by these rainbow-colored cascades of water, the two heroines of the picture are walking barefoot under the same umbrella admiring the beauty of smeared reflections on the wet asphalt. Who are they? Old friends coming back from school?

Two sisters taking a walk together? Or maybe they just met a few minutes ago because one of them was too absent-minded to take her umbrella and the other was too kind-hearted not to offer hers? We don’t know, but they both seem to be rather delighted by this pastime. The girl on the left is painted in warm yellow shades, while the girl on the right with cold blue ones. If you look at the sidewalk on both sides, you’ll see that their silhouettes divide the canvas in two color zones.

The faces of the girls are blurred and we can’t see their expressions, but we can easily guess their mood in every centimeter of the painting. Bright, emotional and full of life, this portrait will light up the walls of your room and give it a new colorful look!

Who might be interested in buying it?

http://afremov.com/UNDER-THE-DOWNPOUR-PALETTE-KNIFE-Oil-Painting-On-Canvas-By-Leonid-Afremov-Size-24-x30.html

My Motherland Offers Riches To The Tourist, So Why Are So Many Ghanaians Queuing Up To Come To Britain?

Culture 3

Ghana Says ‘Awaaba’- Welcome

A tale of two countries

Article by Henry Bonsu: A journalist and broadcaster (Originally published in TheGuardian)

While my primary government, in London, has been struggling to persuade people in Britain it has done enough to keep out the huddled masses from eastern Europe, my secondary government, in Accra, has also been preoccupied with travel. But rather than keeping undesirables out, Ghana’s government is more concerned with bringing people in: to spend their pounds, dollars and euros on business and tourism. And Ghanaians living in Britain are being asked to do their bit to help turn their country into Africa’s number one destination.

The tourism minister, Jake Obestebi-Lamptey, wants us to tell people that the former Gold Coast has become a “bird-watcher’s paradise, eco-tourism haven and an adventurer’s dream”. I’ve been wondering, though, how we can persuade the locals that they are sitting on such a goldmine. Stroll past the British high commission in Accra on any given evening and you’ll see Ghanaians bedding down, hoping to be the first in the visa queue the next morning.

And the 35,000 Ghanaians who were granted short-term entry to Britain this year, and the similar number of rejects, are just a fraction of those who dream of fleeing poverty. With doctors, nurses and teachers in the vanguard, ministers have been insisting on loyalty clauses for ambitious graduates. Not for nothing are we called the “Jews of Africa”, with an estimated 200,000 Ghanaians and their descendants settling in this country alone since independence.

Some people are used to thinking of Ghana as a “beacon” country of stability and inward investment – the symbolic destination for African-Caribbeans and Americans who wish to reclaim their heritage. Didn’t the IMF and World Bank lavish praise on former president Jerry Rawlings and his successor John Kufuor for their growth rates of 5%? Haven’t Japan and the EU given Ghana millions of dollars for skills training and poverty reduction?

Indeed they have. But when I visit my motherland this summer, it will, once again, be a tale of two countries. I’ll marvel at the beach hotels, luxury estates and free press, and revel in the power of the pound, which takes me from bohemian Brixton to the elite of Ghanaian society in six hours.

But this is the Ghana of the expatriate, and the rich business and political classes, who travel in and out of Britain, but have no intention of staying because their standard of living cannot be replicated in any European country.

The other Ghana is that of my cousin, a pastor, who ministers in the densely populated areas of Greater Accra. Maamobi is typical; a district of shanty housing, open sewers, malaria and mass unemployment. If you are lucky enough to have a job, your minimum wage has just gone up to 11,000 cedis (65p) a day.

My aunt is a typical resident, full of incredible hospitality, but she talks about her own future with little ambition, investing all hope in the children she’s managed to send abroad. Swatting away flies under the burning sun, she chats about whether things can change in “Mother Ghana”, with frequent references to gye nyame (“only God can help us”).

Perhaps such fatalism is understandable in a 60-year-old, who has witnessed colonial rule followed by decades of strong-man politics. But it is more distressing to see the fight go out of younger people, who can spend years in limbo, waiting for an overseas relative to pay some middle man a £3,000 “connection fee” to ease their passage. Ironically these are the same Ghanaians who, once here, will hold down two or three jobs, and contribute their share of an annual $1.5bn in remittances to sustain their family.

When cousins ask me how life is in Britain, I warn that although the 60s Nkrumah generation – which includes my parents – have largely succeeded in grooming their children for a middle-class future, things are more unpleasant for recent arrivals; that unless they have key qualifications (medical, educational or social work), they will have few choices – hence around 60% of London’s parking attendants are Ghanaian or Nigerian.

Perhaps naively I offer to help them do business locally alongside the mechanics, seamstresses and shopkeepers, who somehow manage to make ends meet, but then I hear of Ghana’s frighteningly high interest and inflation rates, the soaring price of utilities (a consequence of foreign-inspired privatisation), and the stop-go electricity supply. If, like my uncle in Kumasi, you take up farming, which comprises 36% of Ghana’s GDP, could you compete with cheap subsidised goods from the west, without being given access to European and US markets?

Would you wait for change to be delivered by Blair and Geldof’s African Commission? No, in those circumstances, £6 an hour as a security guard or a cleaner in a faraway country may sound like a better way to make money. Perhaps, like the dozens of others who’ll be bedding down outside the British high commission tonight, you’d rehearse your lines in preparation for an interview, and perhaps a passport to life in London’s underbelly. So, if you’re a British traveller huffing at the occasional delay at Heathrow, spare a thought for the other kind of global traffic heading in your direction with tourism the last thing on its mind.

Would France Be Free From Terrorism Without Colonizing Many Islamic Countries?

 

France 3“France population consists of dangerous terrorists born and raised in the country, making the country an easy target.” – Joel Savage

The scramble for Africa was very swift. It was an opportunity Europeans made good use of it, but with iron fist, after discovering Africa’s wealth, in the least advanced continent. Even though malaria killed hundreds of Europeans, by 1862, they had reached the source of the Nile, then little later, they traced the route of the Niger and confirmed the reality of Africa’s rich mineral resources- ivory, gold, diamonds, tin, copper, rubber etc.

Between the 1870’s and 1900, Africa experienced European imperialist invasion, diplomatic pressures, military invasions, and eventual conquest and colonization. Among other European countries, France had Republic of Benin, Upper Volta, now Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of Chad, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Senegal and Republic of Togo in Sub-Saharan Africa, and Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia in North Africa, then Djibouti, Lebanon and Syria.

Since most of the countries colonized by France were Islamic countries, Islam became the second largest professed religion in France, following Catholic-Christians, with an estimated total of 5 to 10 percent of the national population. France stands as the largest Muslim country in Western Europe. Do we have to ask: Would France be free from terrorism without colonizing many Islamic countries?

As the story unfolds, France ruled heavy Islamic dominant countries, including Republic of Guinea, until Guinea attained its independence in 1958.  Like Belgium, that couldn’t stand the pain of losing Congo and embarked on ruthless destruction of Congo, both physically and medically, France aimed to destroy Guinea as well. They emptied all the coffers of the bank and took everything from the state house, including the furniture to France. The newly elected Prime Minister Ahmed Sekou Touré inherited a very bad economy and complete looted country.

France still interested in Africa, established its embassies in every country they colonized and continued interfering with African politics. The reason whenever there is coup in any of the countries France colonized, they quickly send the military to arrest the situation. France seen as paradise, nationals from countries they colonized in Africa, had the opportunity to travel to France to study, request for political asylum and  to work as immigrants.

Apart from migration, a lot of Muslims were born in France, amounting to 15 percent of the total population, creating Muslim communities through out France. The country therefore has a long and complicated relationship with the Muslim world and its own immigrant population, many of whom have been in the country for generations.

Due to the heavy concentration of Muslims in France, the country is therefore an easy target for terrorists.  In the beginning of this year, gunmen shot dead 12 people at the Paris office of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, in an apparent militant Islamist attack. That’s where France should have been careful to avoid the present  attacks that have killed at least 129 people.

Under President Francois Hollande, France launched its first airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria in September, but external attacks against terrorists, can’t weaken the foundation of terrorism threatening France, because the enemies-terrorists are within the people in the country. The France government should first fight against terrorism at home, to weaken its foundation, before concentrating on external issues.

THE RAP

RAPP

The roiling action of Ernest Brawley’s novel The Rap takes place in and around a penitentiary much like San Quentin. The time is the early 70s, when George Jackson, Angela Davis and others were agitating for prison reform, and the authorities were doing everything they could do to thwart them. A young, sympathetic guard, Arvin Weed, attends night classes at a local college in pursuit of a dream to break away from his worst nightmare: working at the prison forever, like his father.

But his reputation as a Vietnam vet rifle marksman draws him unwittingly into a conspiracy to murder revolutionary, black militant leader, William Galliot, who’s just been sent to prison. Arvin’s evil cousin, Wasco Weed, also a recent arrival to the prison, fancies himself a criminal genius, and has, in fact, been directly tapped by conservative political eminences to assassinate Galliot, the revolutionary.

Wasco shrewdly manipulates everyone in his orbit, including his voluptuous wife, Moke, an almost supernatural creature given to midnight swims in the ocean and driven by a ferocious craving for money and power; Fast-Walking Miniver, a young guard and the warden’s scapegrace son; Big Arv, Arvin’s loutish father; Lobo Miniver, the urbane and opportunistic warden; and even Wasco’s own mother, Evie, the bawdy proprietress of a whorehouse. Moving from the tragic to the comic, the obscene to the exalted, the real to the surreal, The Rap is the ultimate American saga.

The Author

RAPP 2

Ernest Brawley is a native Californian. His father was a prison guard, and he was raised on the grounds of several penitentiaries. He worked his way through college as a forklift driver at a tomato packing shed, a switchman on the Southern Pacific Railroad, and as a guard at San Quentin Prison, where he saw duty in the Gun Towers, the Big Yard and Death Row.

He attended the University of California at Santa Barbara and San Francisco State University, where he was granted several writing scholarships and a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing. Since then, he has spent his life writing novels and film scripts, teaching, and traveling the world. He has published three novels, THE RAP, SELENA, and THE ALAMO TREE. THE RAP and SELENA will be republished soon by Little Machines Press/Roots Digital. His latest novel, BLOOD MOON, will soon be published by Roots Digital as well.

Brawley has taught at the University of Hawaii, Hunter College, New York University and the Pantheon-Sorbonne. He has lived and worked in Argentina, Spain, France, Italy, England, India, Thailand and Japan. And once in his youth he hitchhiked all the way around the world. He is a recipient of the Joseph Henry Jackson Award in Literature and served for several years on the Fiction Award Committee of the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington.

 Kirkus Review of his novel THE RAP:

The definitive prison blockbuster — raw and brawling — perhaps necessarily overlong as it piles details and encounters and endlessly intertwined relationships into a powerful and engrossing first novel by a writer in the James Jones tradition. “”The rap”” refers as much to the guards as the inmates they supposedly protect both from society and each other — for they are as much locked into prison life as the convicts. Specifically this applies to Little Arv, son of a prison sergeant, and his pal and brother-in-law, Fast-Walking Miniver, son of the warden, who both exist in the shadow of Little Arv’s satanic cousin Wasco Weed, Arv’s feared (yet perversely admired) childhood bully companion.

Wasco has been promised he’ll be let off a murder rap if he only offs William Galliot, a black militant leader in the clink on trumped-up charges. Waste uses his wife, an other-worldly (but definitely not ethereal) Hawaiian water freak named Moke to sucker in Arv — who, knowing this, goes along anyway, loving her with crazy passion — as she sets him up for official blackmail by getting him to smuggle in letters to Galliot. But even the best-laid plans of cons and criminal bureaucrats go wrong.

As Moke falls for Arv, the blacks use their escape plan in the nick of time, and Arv — the presumed hatchet man — has the choice of shooting his cousin or Galliot. As a former guard, the writer presents an enormous amount of authentic fascinating info on stuff like prisoner hierarchy (as complex and corrupt as the one outside) and pimping; his characters are both improbable and believable, and the writing is as tough and gritty as it should be — and then

http://www.amazon.com/Ernest-Brawley/e/B001HPR4E2/

Exodus Politics: Civil Rights and Leadership in African American Literature and Culture (American Literatures Initiative

Exodus

Using the term “exodus politics” to theorize the valorization of black male leadership in the movement for civil rights, Robert J. Patterson explores the ways in which the political strategies and ideologies of this movement paradoxically undermined the collective enfranchisement of black people. He argues that by narrowly conceptualizing civil rights in only racial terms and relying solely on a male figure, conventional African American leadership, though frequently redemptive, can also erode the very goals of civil rights.

The author turns to contemporary African American writers such as Ernest Gaines, Gayl Jones, Alice Walker, and Charles Johnson to show how they challenge the dominant models of civil rights leadership.

He draws on a variety of disciplines―including black feminism, civil rights history, cultural studies, and liberation theology―in order to develop a more nuanced formulation of black subjectivity and politics.

Patterson’s connection of the concept of racial rights to gender and sexual rights allows him to illuminate the literature’s promotion of more expansive models. By considering the competing and varied political interests of black communities, these writers reimagine the dominant models in a way that can empower communities to be self-sustaining in the absence of a messianic male leader.

The Author

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Dr. Patterson is an Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, and Director of the African American Studies Program at Georgetown University. His book, Exodus Politics: Civil Rights and Leadership African American Literature and Culture (UVA Press, 2013), argues that African American literature written after the civil rights movement challenges society’s tendencies to think of civil rights solely in terms of race, to deem black male leadership as necessary for civil rights attainment, and to contain the scope of the civil rights movement to the fifteen year period between 1963-1968.

In addition to this project, Dr. Patterson has published articles on W.E.B. Dubois, Toni Morrison, African American Women’s Writing,Tyler Perry’s films. Some of his work appears in South Atlantic Quarterly Black Camera, Religion and Literature, the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and the Cambridge Companion to Civil Rights Literature. He co-guest edited a special edition of South Atlantic Quarterly, Black Literature, Black Leadership (112.2).

Extending his interest scholarly interests in the post-civil rights era, black popular culture, and the politics of gender, he also has begun to work on a second book project, Destructive Desires: Black Popular Culture and the Intimacy of Politics, which analyzes the various ways that African Americans used popular and expressive culture to negotiate racial politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. He is also co-editing a book, The Psychic Hold of Slavery, which is an interdisciplinary collection of scholarly essays that considers why and how slavery still matters.

http://www.amazon.com/Exodus-Politics-Leadership-Literature-Literatures/dp/0813935261