Quotes Of Some Of Africa’s Great Writers

Africa is a continent of rich culture, tradition, heritage and customs, producing great writers from different backgrounds. Some of the writers’ books have played significant role in Africa’s education for ages. Below are quotes of some of Africa’s great writers.

Chinua Achebe

Achebe

“When suffering knocks at your door and you say there is no seat for him, he tells you not to worry because he has brought his own stool.” – Chinua Achebe.

Wole Soyinka

Wole

“My horizon on humanity is enlarged by reading the writers of poems, seeing a painting, listening to some music, some opera, which has nothing at all to do with a volatile human condition or struggle or whatever. It enriches me as a human being.” – Wole Soyinka.

Nawal El Saadawi

Nawal

“Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”
Nawal El Saadawi.

Nadine Gordimer

Nadine

“Writing is making sense of life. You work your whole life and perhaps you’ve made sense of one small area.”- Nadine Gordimer.
Nelson Mandela

Dela

“Education is the most powerful weapon which can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela.

Kwame Nkrumah

Nkru 1

“The forces that unite us are intrinsic and greater than the superimposed influences that keep us apart.” ― Kwame Nkrumah

http://www.amazon.com/Opening-Spaces-Anthology-Contemporary-African/dp/0435910108/

 

 

 

What We All Long For

“They were born in the city from people born elsewhere.”

What We All Long For follows the overlapping stories of a close circle of second-generation twenty-somethings living in downtown Toronto. There’s Tuyen, a lesbian avant-garde artist and the daughter of Vietnamese parents who’ve never recovered from losing one of their children in the crush to board a boat out of Vietnam in the 1970s. Tuyen defines herself in opposition to just about everything her family believes in and strives for.

Dione

She’s in love with her best friend Carla, a biracial bicycle courier, who’s still reeling from the loss of her mother to suicide eighteen years earlier and who must now deal with her brother Jamal’s latest acts of delinquency. Oku is a jazz-loving poet who, unbeknownst to his Jamaican-born parents, has dropped out of university.

He is in constant conflict with his narrow-minded and verbally abusive father and tormented by his unrequited love for Jackie, a gorgeous black woman who runs a hip clothing shop on Queen Street West and dates only white men. Like each of her friends, Jackie feels alienated from her parents, former hipsters from Nova Scotia who never made it out of subsidized housing after their lives became entangled with desire and disappointment.

The four characters try to make a life for themselves in the city, supporting one another through their family struggles.

There’s a fifth main character, Quy, the child who Tuyen’s parents lost in Vietnam. In his first-person narrative, Quy describes how he survived in various refugee camps, then in the Thai underworld. After years of being hardened, he has finally made his way to Toronto and will soon be reunited with his family – whether to love them or hurt them, it’s not clear. His story builds to a breathless crescendo in an ending that will both shock and satisfy readers.

What We All Long For is a gripping and, at times, heart-rending story about identity, longing and loss in a cosmopolitan city. No other writer has presented such a powerful and richly textured portrait of present-day Toronto. Rinaldo Walcott writes in The Globe and Mail: “… every great city has its literary moments, and contemporary Toronto has been longing for one. We can now say with certainty that we no longer have to long for a novel that speaks this city’s uniqueness: Dionne Brand has given us exactly that.” Donna Bailey Nurse writes in the National Post: “What We All Long For is a watershed novel. From now on, Canadian writers will be pressed to portray contemporary Toronto in all its multiracial colour and polyphonic sound.”

But What We All Long For is not only about a particular city. It’s about the universal experience of being human. As Walcott puts it, “Brand makes us see ourselves differently and anew. She translates our desires and experiences into a language, an art that allows us to voice that which we live, but could not utter or bring to voice until she did so for us.”

The Author

Dione 2

Dionne Brand is a renowned poet, novelist, and essayist. Her writing is notable for the beauty of its language, and for its intense engagement with issues of social justice, including particularly issues of gender and race. She was educated at the University of Toronto, where she earned a BA in English and Philosophy and an MA in the Philosophy of Education.

Dionne Brand became prominent first as an award-winning poet, winning the Governor General’s Literary Award for her volume Land to Light On, and nominated for the volumes No Language Is Neutral and Inventory respectively. She has won the Pat Lowther Award for poetry and her volume thirsty was nominated for the Griffin Poetry Prize. But she has also achieved great distinction and acclaim in fiction, non-fiction, and film.

Her fiction includes the novel In Another Place, Not Here, a New York Times notable book in 1998, and At the Full and Change of the Moon, a Los Angeles Times Notable Book of the Year in 1999. (The Village Voice also included Dionne Brand in its 1999 “Writers on the Verge” literary supplement.) Her latest critically acclaimed and Toronto Book Award winning novel, What We All Long For, is the story of four young people in Toronto; like thirsty, a recent book of poems, the novel offers an indelible portrait of this great multicultural city. Her non-fiction includes Bread Out Of Stone, and A Map to the Door of No Return, which is a meditation on Blackness in the diaspora.

Dionne Brand has published eighteen books, contributed to seventeen anthologies, written dozens of essays and articles, and made four documentary films for the National Film Board. She was recently a Distinguished Visiting Professor at St. Lawrence University in New York and has taught literature and creative writing at universities in both British Columbia and Ontario. She has also held the Ruth Wynn Woodward Chair in Women’s Studies at Simon Fraser University. She lives in Toronto and presently holds a University Research Chair at the University of Guelph where she is a professor.

http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&field-author=Dionne+Brand&search-alias=books-ca

Mirror Of Souls By Award Winning Author Angella Ricot

This book is a breakthrough in modern day poetry. It is an eclectic book that reflects contemporary society with its problems and its vision. In this book, the author uses her talent as a gifted poet to paint a rather realistic picture of the human condition, where she also vividly describes the struggle for survival. Within the passages of her poems, the author debates upon the issue of fate versus faith.
Angella
She also contemplates the nature of truth versus happiness. She offers spiritual hope, and some thoughts on meditation. Throughout the book, the theme is a quest for truth, a quest for freedom: freedom from our daily anguish, freedom from miseries, and from madness. Most importantly, the author also offers insight on the role of the poet today and/or how the poet is viewed within society.
The Author
Angella 2
Born in Haiti, award-winning author Angella Ricot immigrated to the United States over twenty years ago. A graduate of the University of South Florida, she was trained in both psychology and the medical sciences. She has appeared in the Miami Times and in the New York Caribbean newspapers.
Her first book, Mirror of Souls, was released in 2004, with subsequent works pending publication. AngellaRicot currently lives in the heart of the cosmopolitan city of New York. While her rigorous training laid the foundation for her career, her roots in the Caribbean mixed with the zest of urban city life provide the tapestry for her inspirations.