Life As Immigrant At The Notorious Pantanella In Via Casilina Rome

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma Novembre 1990 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan, Bangladesh, Africani tra cui (Joel Savage) Panoramica della Pantanella. Rome

As a child growing up in a strongly religious family, I was thought that everything which is opposite to the teachings of the Holy Bible, including laziness is a sin. I tried my best to live a clean life. We were thought to believe that Israel, Jerusalem, and other Biblical countries were all in heaven, without a slight knowledge those countries were on the same earth we are living today.

When I left my family looking for a job, I tried to be sincere and prevented doing anything wrong which could land me in jail. I read that jail changes people’s attitude to be good or worse. But I wasn’t interested to know the positive or negative influences of jail on people. My only interest is never to be there because it’s not the right place for me.

In the year 1990, from Lagos, Nigeria, I made a transit in Rome, on my way to German. In Rome, I was detained at the Fiumicino airport. The Italian immigration regularly does that to many foreigners, especially Africans. Like a tourist, I walked around the airport lounge without a room to sleep and food for three days. On the third, I was really starving, so I approached one of the immigration officials and said to him that I am hungry. He looked at my face and asked me “Am I your father?” Then he walked away.

Without knowing what the officials have in store for me, I handed over an application for asylum as a journalist and it worked, because I have some few publications over my profession on me. On the fourth day, from nowhere came one of the immigration officers, he said to me: “Your application has been accepted, today the police will come to take you to Rome.” I was shocked beyond expression.

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.

 The good Samaritan didn’t only deliver the unexpected message, but he pulled out from his pocket a number of notes and said to me: “I don’t want my colleagues to see me giving you money, buy some food to eat at the airport.” I didn’t take the money. I told him: “This important information you have given to me has taken all the hunger away, thank you.” He walked away with his money.

On the fourth day, the police came, just as the officer told me and took me in a police car to the city, Rome, and left me there to fight for my survival. Without anywhere to sleep, I passed all my nights at the Central Train Station. Among other Africans, we watched a big television screen during the day to forget our misery, then in the night, I go to sleep at my hiding place. The police and the workers at the train station never discovered the place I slept.

After some time, I discovered places where I could eat every day without paying for food. I could take my bath and take some clothes. One of such places was at ‘Via Dandolo.’ Daniela, the head of the Caritas (Charity) at Via Dandolo, was a very good woman, but one of her female workers was a very bad woman. A thief. Since we had no address, our letters passed through the Caritas at Via Dandola and this woman took the opportunity to steal money from our letters.

I caught her twice, so I wasn’t surprised when I lost the 10 pounds a friend sent me from England, but I didn’t tell Daniela about it. Through the Caritas, I had my initial lessons and attended classes to learn the Italian. I was one of the best immigrants who could write and speak the language fluently, yet my life was miserable because I was still sleeping at the train station.

In Rome, I was robbed, admitted and operated at a hospital, but the nurse refused to touch me, because of my color, thus; every morning when on duty, she calls someone to attend to me, but she had time for every Italian patient at the hospital. I was once sitting in the hospital’s garden after the operation, when an Italian old man, one of the patients came close to me, looked at my face and said to me: “Marocchino motaccizoa.” – an insult, after mistakenly taken me as a Moroccan. I didn’t say a word.

Then all of a sudden, as if it was announced on the radio, all the immigrants in Rome, without accommodation, discovered an abandoned Pasta factory called ‘Pantanella.’ Pantanella is notoriously known for all criminal activities, including drug peddling and crime, similar to drug cartel zones of Mexico. One needs strength, courage, heart and braveness to survive at that place. Italians think they are brave, but many of them dare to pass Via Casilina, the street Pantanella is located in the night.

That was the place I lived and worked as a toilet cleaner for thousands of immigrants, using six containers as toilets, to raise money to feed. I was employed by the Muslim head at the place. It’s terrible and frightening to live at Pantenella. It wasn’t a prison, but the place, I think was tough like Alcatraz, because of the criminal activities many illegal immigrants engaged in feeding.

 

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Scoppia un incendio durante lo sgombero Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.A fire during the evacuation

The abandoned factory accommodated both soft and hardened criminals from various countries, including Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Africa etc. I lived in Pantanella for four months, and the Italian government tired of the crimes going on in that abandoned Pasta factory ejected all the foreigners.

But the Italian government did something great for the African immigrants. Something we weren’t expecting. The government paid for two weeks stay in a hotel for all the Africans, with the ultimatum that before the two weeks expired, we should find a place on our own to live.

Through a very good sympathetic woman called Nana, (she died in Rome a few years ago) I got a job as a houseboy to serve one journalist called Claudio Lavazza, working at television station TG2, belonging to the former Italian Prime Minister, Sylvio Berlusconi. He provided me accommodation and paid me well. Besides, he gave me the new version of Fiat Cinque Cento (500) to drive. It may be likely that I was the first black man in the entire Italy to drive the new Fiat Cinque Cento when it freshly came out. I met other journalist friends of Claudio, including Michele Cucuzza.

After three years, I said goodbye to Rome and returned to Africa. I married and returned to Europe once again but this time choosing Amsterdam. ‘Overseas Chronicle: The Rome and Amsterdam Experience’ is a book once started you’ll find it hard to put away, because of the shocking intriguing stories in the book. Find out more of what happened to me in Rome and later in Holland, which led me to detention in Amsterdam.

 

Come sono sopravvissuto come un immigrato nella Pantanella pericoloso può essere letto in: 
Chronicle 3
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Would France Be Free From Terrorism Without Colonizing Many Islamic Countries?

 

France 3“France population consists of dangerous terrorists born and raised in the country, making the country an easy target.” – Joel Savage

The scramble for Africa was very swift. It was an opportunity Europeans made good use of it, but with iron fist, after discovering Africa’s wealth, in the least advanced continent. Even though malaria killed hundreds of Europeans, by 1862, they had reached the source of the Nile, then little later, they traced the route of the Niger and confirmed the reality of Africa’s rich mineral resources- ivory, gold, diamonds, tin, copper, rubber etc.

Between the 1870’s and 1900, Africa experienced European imperialist invasion, diplomatic pressures, military invasions, and eventual conquest and colonization. Among other European countries, France had Republic of Benin, Upper Volta, now Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of Chad, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, Senegal and Republic of Togo in Sub-Saharan Africa, and Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia in North Africa, then Djibouti, Lebanon and Syria.

Since most of the countries colonized by France were Islamic countries, Islam became the second largest professed religion in France, following Catholic-Christians, with an estimated total of 5 to 10 percent of the national population. France stands as the largest Muslim country in Western Europe. Do we have to ask: Would France be free from terrorism without colonizing many Islamic countries?

As the story unfolds, France ruled heavy Islamic dominant countries, including Republic of Guinea, until Guinea attained its independence in 1958.  Like Belgium, that couldn’t stand the pain of losing Congo and embarked on ruthless destruction of Congo, both physically and medically, France aimed to destroy Guinea as well. They emptied all the coffers of the bank and took everything from the state house, including the furniture to France. The newly elected Prime Minister Ahmed Sekou Touré inherited a very bad economy and complete looted country.

France still interested in Africa, established its embassies in every country they colonized and continued interfering with African politics. The reason whenever there is coup in any of the countries France colonized, they quickly send the military to arrest the situation. France seen as paradise, nationals from countries they colonized in Africa, had the opportunity to travel to France to study, request for political asylum and  to work as immigrants.

Apart from migration, a lot of Muslims were born in France, amounting to 15 percent of the total population, creating Muslim communities through out France. The country therefore has a long and complicated relationship with the Muslim world and its own immigrant population, many of whom have been in the country for generations.

Due to the heavy concentration of Muslims in France, the country is therefore an easy target for terrorists.  In the beginning of this year, gunmen shot dead 12 people at the Paris office of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, in an apparent militant Islamist attack. That’s where France should have been careful to avoid the present  attacks that have killed at least 129 people.

Under President Francois Hollande, France launched its first airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria in September, but external attacks against terrorists, can’t weaken the foundation of terrorism threatening France, because the enemies-terrorists are within the people in the country. The France government should first fight against terrorism at home, to weaken its foundation, before concentrating on external issues.

Tears, Assurance And Consolation

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David Newton, a classically trained sculptor in the European tradition, has dedicated his career to transforming ordinary African-American people and forgotten historical moments into unforgettable, timeless monuments of beauty.

Tears, Assurance And Consolation

Anguish and torment have taken over their souls

Psychologically and physically scarred, they seek comfort

The soul is willing to forgive but the mind finds it hard to forget

Because the scar is like an image hanging on the wall

My heart believes there is God, yet I try to find out if Africans have God

I want to know why so much pain?

Why so much tears from my eyes?

Why a particular race should pass through such a rough road?

Do I have to believe that God created man in his own image?

As the moon unravels wonders

I will take the opportunity to free my mind

The shackles are already removed from my feet

I heard the voice calling and saying trust in Jesus

His blessings, no money can buy and no one can steal from you.

Short poem written by Joel Savage@Copyright/ 11/3/2015.

What’s Dominating Us In This Generation

Dangerous 2

Original article posted by daniabbott11: (November 1, 2015)

In our time today, a lot of useful things had evolved. Communication, hobbies, studying, and a lot more can all be done easily. Everything is modern in this generation. People are becoming great in their field of work and interests. Great musicians are everywhere, great writers, great poets, great thinkers, great scientists, great athletes, great entertainers, great technologists and a lot more great people. But how are we doing with being a plain person? Are we also doing a great job?

We are living today in a world where beauty and fame is the main measurement of being a person. Notice how all we see today in the television and in the magazines are just pretty faces. Of course, one component of being a celebrity is having a pretty face, but do we take notice of those people who are not that pretty but offer a lot of talent, do we give them an opportunity to make themselves shine? What about those people who are great thinkers but are too shy to make themselves notice?

Do we take notice of them and do we help them express themselves? And notice how cheaters, thieves and liars are dominating us. In school, cheaters are given high marks while those who studied and didn’t cheat sink at the bottom of the class. Look at the cheaters graduating and becoming thieves, liars and forever cheaters. Take notice of the people working hard but still whatever they do seems like it’s never enough. Why? It’s because we take them for granted.

When someone famous gives a shallow and stupid statement it goes trending worldwide and when someone talks about something sensible and intelligent we judge them for being too boring or worse we won’t even care. This only proves that we are letting fame, beauty and lies dominate us. Great ideas are dominated by shallow thinking. Great work is dominated by lies and fame. “Who cares who did this and that? Who cares who said this and that?

They’re not famous anyway.” Why don’t we make them famous instead of those we keep on worshipping when they don’t even contribute to the betterment of this world? I’m not saying that it’s wrong to entertain ourselves once in a while, it’s not wrong to love some artists, it’s not wrong to love what we’re seeing but what is wrong is letting those things we love dominate our society. It is wrong to let those we see, watch, hear and idolize takeover of what we’re supposed to be thinking and doing.

That’s the main reason why we’re getting worse. People are hating each other because they don’t like the same artists, smart people are being stupid because stupid people are becoming more stupid, people are willing to kill just for power and fame, it won’t be long when we’re all acting and living like cavemen. Sensible people are losing hope in living, can we blame them? Can we judge them for being weak?

No, we can’t because the forces of those people who are blinding themselves with greed and nonsense are becoming too strong. Smart people opt to stay quiet instead of being judge. No, they are not weak, some of them are not shy, they just don’t want to stoop down the level of mediocrity and shallowness in thinking of those people surrounding them.

https://daniabbott11.wordpress.com/2015/11/01/whats-dominating-us-in-this-generation/

The Bundle Of Joy And Other Stories From Africa

Since 2010, Africa Book Club has been the go-to place for book lovers looking to explore interesting fiction and non-fiction from Africa. From the popular Africa Book Club Short Reads monthly writing competition, comes this original collection of short stories.

Joy

We have pulled together over 50 winning stories that run the breadth of the continent in terms of the countries and themes they cover. They reflect a continent on the move, one that is bustling with life, creativity, love, laughter, opportunity, hope, and promise – a far cry from the singularly negative stereotypes that so often come to mind when reading about Africa.

The bundle of and other stories from Africa are the works of various African writers.

by Mercy Dhliwayo (Author), Mark Mngomezulu (Author), Andrew Dakalira (Author), Nicola Coady (Author), Chinenye Emezie-Egwuonwu (Author), Winfred Karungi Ssewava (Author), Mulumba Ivan Matthias (Author), James Whyle (Author), Macharia Mwangi (Author), Kevin Eze (Author), Tendai Machingaidze (Author), Constant Van Graan (Author), and Others (Author), Daniel Musiitwa (Editor)

http://www.amazon.com/Bundle-Joy-Other-Stories-Africa/dp/1941221041

 

The Secret River

Winner of the Commonwealth Writers Prize and Australian Book Industry Awards, Book of the Year. After a childhood of poverty and petty crime in the slums of London, William Thornhill is transported to New South Wales for the term of his natural life. With his wife Sal and children in tow, he arrives in a harsh land that feels at first like a death sentence.
River
But among the convicts there is a whisper that freedom can be bought, an opportunity to start afresh. As Thornhill stakes his claim on a patch of ground by the Hawkesbury River, the battle lines between the old and new inhabitants are drawn. Inspired by research into her own family history, Kate Grenville vividly creates the reality of settler life, its longings, dangers and dilemmas.
The Secret River is a groundbreaking story about identity, belonging and ownership. There is no doubt Grenville is one of our greatest writers. A book everyone should read. It is evocative, gracefully written, terrible and confronting. And it has resonance for ever’.
The Author

Kate 2

Kate Grenville was born in Sydney, Australia. She’s published eight books of fiction, including the multiple prize-winners ‘The Secret River’, ‘The Lieutenant’, ‘The Idea of Perfection’, and ‘Lilian’s Story’. She’s also published three books about the writing process that are classic texts for Creative Writing classes, and a memoir about the research and writing of ‘The Secret River’.

Grenville writes about Australia, but her themes are universal: love, violence, and survival. Her characters are often inspired by real historical characters: her own nineteenth century convict ancestor, an early Australian settler; a bag-lady on the streets of 1950s Sydney who quotes Shakespeare for a living; a soldier in the Sydney of 1788 who shares an extraordinary friendship of tenderness and respect with a young Aboriginal girl.
Grenville’s international prizes include the Orange Award, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, and a shortlisting for the Man Booker Prize. Her books have been published all over the world and translated into many languages, and two have been made into feature films.

Learn more about Kate Grenville, her books, and how to get hold of them, at

http://kategrenville.com./

http://www.amazon.com/Kate-Grenville/e/B001HMOCTU