Leave The Problems Behind And Take A Positive Step Into The Year 2016

Chearing 1Happiness and togetherness is all that we need to make this world beautiful

Many are  struggling  to overcome anxiety disorder, fear and uncertainty, only to get disappointing results, because crime, violence and terrorism are taking away our peaceful and happy moments.

The problem is that most people find it hard to overcome their fears, because it’s part of who they are. That’s actually a mistake. “No one drinks medicine on the behalf of a sick person,” a Ghanaian proverb, meaning your happiness is in your own hands.

At times sadness, loneliness and depression make us feel miserable and scared, because we don’t know what tomorrow may bring. If you take a wider view of things you could discover that dating and friendships seem to be disappointments. Many are hurt or recovering from love affair disasters. Why must my dates end in this way? This is one of the questions that usually follows.

Many times it may be differences of opinions, careers and misunderstandings, but at times it may turn out to be that the partners don’t like something about each other, especially about his or her character. Humbleness and politeness create a happy environment, but how many people there are polite and humble?

Within some few days, we shall be witnessing the new year (2016). Are you going to carry your problems along with you? We often allow problems to take its toll on us, than finding solutions.

If the blind can play the piano, someone without hands, can open the chapters of a book, with his toes or tongue, then why do you have to grumble when you are physically strong?

The purpose of this article is to encourage, not to discourage. There are many opportunities there for you. Let God be your guide to choose wisely and let your hopes and dreams be a reality in year 2016.

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Should Writers Respond to Comments on Their Articles?

 

 

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Original article by Yael Grauer, published by The Freelancer

When I first started writing, everyone always warned me to stay far, far away from the comments. Perhaps I’m narcissistic—or a glutton for punishment—but I found it nearly impossible to stop myself from checking in. When writing for MMA sites, I’d read through insult after insult written by teenagers living in their parents’ basement (our core audience), which was never a pleasant experience.

The free weekly paper that paid me pennies to blog about food after it fired its full-time food writer clearly didn’t have the staff to moderate comments. Whenever I’d give a restaurant a good review, I’d get to sift through weird conspiracy theories about how I was secretly coerced into saying nice things because of some kind of advertising deal that didn’t actually exist. I always felt slightly betrayed that these sites hung us writers out to dry by not moderating at all. I rarely responded, though I was tempted to create fake accounts to argue with readers about how I was right. I always wondered if the wrath of commenters would taint how editors viewed my work.

I was a ghostwriter for a couple of large health websites, always surprised at how the people I ghosted for reacted to the comments. They’d expect rewrites and revisions over minor nitpicks, even if the commenter was wrong.

Sites have wildly different opinions on whether journalists should engage with readers. Some sites don’t seem to pay attention, while others—such as MindHut and SparkLife—even go so far as rewarding writers who get a certain amount of upvotes when responding to comments.

Continuation link: http://contently.net/2015/07/30/stories/writers-respond-comments-articles/