The Palace Of A Thousand Rainbows

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This is the story of Barun, an unsure boy, born in Calcutta, India. At thirteen, Barun is 5’8” tall and a champion in tennis. Girls fling at him messages in lumped pieces of paper. Mother’s friends shower suspicious affection on him. 

He meets Maria a few weeks before his fourteenth birthday. Maria’s pulse stops a few weeks later. A playroom palace, a dry pipal leaf in Rabindranath Tagore’s Gitanjali and his promise to Maria set him on a journey.

A journey in search of enduring love. A search for his Palace of Rainbows. Maa, his mother, becomes his private metaphor for sensuality.

Sakshi walks into his life as his wife. Shalini – a vivacious, lonely nurse, Gargi – a luscious, smart journalist, Chandni – a gorgeous, tormented, decisive woman with suspicious links – all cross his path – intimately.

Shoma – Barun’s schoolmate Sid’s sister comes back into his life. Will it be Shoma and the Palace!  Forty years speed past him with Maa by his side.

Does he find his Palace at the end of this tortuous erotic journey!!!! This book explores some never answered human vulnerabilities to love and eroticism.

Erotic attractions and passionate fantasies become integral parts of the protagonist’s
search and his journey through life.

Socially unacceptable amorous attractions quietly slip into close relationships leading to
enduring consequences. Human frailties make the impossible a reality and the possible a pipe dream……

The Author

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Bilol Bose holds an MBA and is an accredited applied behavioural science professional. In his teens, he authored stories and poems, some of which were published and later forgotten.

He wrote the first draft of the Palace of a Thousand Rainbows during a rainy Mumbai July of 2004. He makes two distant ends meet through his daytime profession of consulting with large organisations.

And fills his laptop with stories that are yet to be told, whenever they occur to him. Bilol lives in Mumbai (Bombay), India.

http://www.amazon.com/Palace-Thousand-Rainbows-Novel-ebook/dp/B016LX7YQW

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Combating Vaccine Extremism In America

Polio 5Vaccine against Polio in Africa contaminated, giving birth to Africa’s Aids crisis today. Polio victims in Sierra Leone.

Article by Barbara Loe Fisher and published in National Vaccine Information Center Health Magazine.

2016 will be my 34th year as a vaccine safety and human rights activist. For more than 20 years I have been warning that the day would come when vaccine extremists and profiteers would move to legally force Americans to buy and use all government mandated vaccines and punish those who refuse. 

Still, it was a shock to see it happen in California this year, even as I know that preparations are being made by vaccine extremists to attack the religious and conscientious belief vaccine exemptions in more states next year.

But knowing and predicting what will happen is very different from watching it actually happen.

Born in Minnesota to a mother, who was a nurse, and a father, who fought on the beach at Anzio and then re-enlisted in the Army after returning from World War II,  I was raised with a deep respect for the values and beliefs upon which this Republic was founded and for the natural rights and principles of democratic government outlined in the U.S. Constitution. 

Like so many others who are grateful for freedom of thought and religion in this country, my abiding faith in a Creator of the natural order sustains me during my life’s journey and I believe Americans will not give up the natural rights and cultural values that define who we are as a nation without a fight.

Earlier this year, when vaccine extremists and profiteers used a few cases of measles at Disneyland to attack freedom of speech, thought, religious belief and assembly, my heart sank. It was painful to watch good people be demonized for simply criticizing poorly tested vaccines and inhumane one-size-fits-all vaccine policies.

Then, when dozens of pharmaceutical and medical industry-backed bills were introduced in multiple states to eliminate religious and conscientious belief vaccine exemptions so citizens could be tracked, discriminated against, segregated and punished for making vaccine choices that do not conform with government policy, I held my breath.

What would the people do? Would they bow down and cower before their oppressors, or would they stand up and defend their natural rights and civil liberties?

In a remarkable display of outrage, common sense and courage, we witnessed mothers, fathers and grandparents from every walk of life in California show up by the thousands to testify in legislative hearings and hold rallies in Sacramento opposing a forced vaccination law that was rammed through the legislature, despite the biggest public protests in that state Capitol since the Viet Nam war.

The same thing happened in Vermont, where industry lobbyists strong armed enough legislators to eliminate the philosophical belief vaccine exemption despite overwhelming public opposition, even as spirited citizen action in Texas and nine other states was successful in blocking the passage of bills stripping away personal belief vaccine exemptions.

Continue reading: http://www.nvic.org/NVIC-Vaccine-News/December-2015/combating-vaccine-extremism-in-america.aspx

Secret Son

A 30-year old Moroccan Arab, Nabil Amrani, gets entangled in an adulterous relationship with his pregnant wife’s nurse, Rachida, and this results in pregnancy. To save the honor of her family, Nabil’s mother sacks the nurse. Nabil gives her some money to go get an abortion. All this is kept a secret from Malika, Nabil’s legitimate wife.

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Malika gives birth to a girl, Amal. Initially the gender issue does not matter to Nabil, but later on when the subject of inheritance surfaces, it becomes an issue and Nabil regrets not having a son. When fired, Rachida relocates to Casablanca, keeps the pregnancy and five months after Amal is born, she gives birth to a son, Youssef. Nobody, not even Nabil, is aware of this.

Rachida does not tell her son who his real father is, but one day the boy confronts his mother and learns the truth. He decides to trace his father, who though surprised to learn that he has a secret son, is somewhat relieved that he has a male offspring to inherit his business empire.

All the while, Nabil’s daughter Amal grows up thinking that she is the only offspring of her father. At some point in time she goes to the USA to get some education. While there she moves in with Fernando, a photographer. Her parents find this out and get furious for, according to them, she has caused a clash of cultures and brought dishonor to her family.

A yawning emotional gulf develops between parents, on one side, and daughter, on the other side. But at the time of her graduation, they visit her, try to persuade her to break up the relationship and to return to Morocco. She accedes to their wish. During this visit Nabil confesses to his daughter the affair he had several years ago, a secret that Malika had by then learned. Nabil’s confession infuriates her daughter and makes her depressed.

Just when Youssef is beginning to enjoy his new life with his father, disaster strikes, thanks to the orchestrations of his stepmother Malika.  He is forced to return to the slums where he grew up, where he is welcomed by the sympathy of his mother and the taunts of his friend, Amin.

A running theme in the novel is the political rivalry between Hatim Lahlou of the Party, which seemed to represent the poor class, and Farid Benaboud, who represents the world of the wealthy – the world into which Youssef has been brutally denied entry and which he now loathes. Youssef falls prey to the politics around him, when Hatim recruits him to carry out an assassination plot.

An enthralling read, Secret Son, provides a window into Moroccan society – a society that has its share of ills, from unemployment to adultery.  The story explores the importance of love and family and how exclusion, poverty and unemployment can drive victims to acts of desperation.

The Author

Laila

Laila Lalami was born and raised in Morocco. She is the author of the short story collection Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits, which was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award, and the novel Secret Son, which was on the Orange Prize longlist.

Her essays and opinion pieces have appeared in Newsweek, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, The Nation, the Guardian, the New York Times, and in numerous anthologies.

She is the recipient of a British Council Fellowship, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship and is currently an associate professor of creative writing at the University of California at Riverside. Her new novel, The Moor’s Account, will be published in September 2014.

http://www.amazon.com/Laila-Lalami/e/B001H6ET12