How Do You Feel When Your Pet Dies After 22 Years?

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A pet lover

One may find it difficult to understand the reason why the death of a pet, sometimes affects the owner emotionally, physically and psychologically. Pets create special bond between the owner and the animal. That bond even becomes stronger when the animal is the only friend the owner has. The way some animal lovers love their pets is amazing. 

That’s the situation of my work mate. She was twenty-three when she had her first cat, since then they have lived happily as a family for twenty-two years. Her cat was sick and the veterinarian told her that the cat wouldn’t live long, due the poor and fragile condition. I think the sickness has something to do with old age.

The bad news affected Lucy emotionally for almost two weeks after visiting the veterinary. Just last month her cat passed away peacefully in its sleep. She was completely distraught and helpless that her ex-husband is now keeping companionship with her.

According Austrian researchers, the relationship between pet owners and their dogs is very similar to the deep connection between young children and their parents. Some pet owners never recover after the death of their beloved pets. I wasn’t surprised when a woman left a will of $1.5 million dollars for her pet in New Your City, when she has children.

Top Doctor: U.S. health authorities waging mass Ebola cover up

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Article originally published by examiner.com

A well known and highly respected doctor has come forth with claims that the U.S. government has been intentionally concealing cases of Ebola in the United States.

Dr. James Lawrenzi made the comments on Thursday while appearing as a guest on the Alex Jones show. Jones, the host of a nationally broadcast radio talk show, Infowars, has been an outspoken critic of the way in which the Ebola health crisis has been handled by the Obama administration. Lawrenzi, who owns and operates two health care facilities located in in Garden City and Archie, Missouri, claims that the number of Ebola patients in the U.S. is much higher than what the Centers for Disease Control has been letting on.

According to Dr. Lawrenzi, his suspicions first arose shortly after news broke that Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian visiting family in Dallas, Texas, was diagnosed with the deadly disease in September of 2014. Lawrenzi claims that he was told by a doctor at Truman Lakewood Medical Center in Kansas City that the hospital was also treating a patient with Ebola like symptoms who was demonstrating a high fever and was bleeding profusely from multiple orifices after having recently returned from West Africa. The following day, claims Lawrenzi, the same doctor told him that the patient had “disappeared” but that it was highly unlikely that the patient could have left of his own accord giving his grave medical condition.

Another patient displaying classic Ebola like symptoms was then admitted to Kansas City’s Research Medical Center the following day but also quickly “disappeared,” said Lawrenzi. Neither patient has ever been found.

“These patients are disappearing, they’re doing something with the patients and God knows where they’re going,” the doctor said.

Lawrenzi said he did not know why the federal government would be intentionally trying to hide the number of patients infected with Ebola, or where they may be taking the infected patients to. but speculated that the cover up may be being carried out by the Centers for Disease Control as a means of preventing panic. “They’re preparing for something,” the doctor added, conjecturing that the illness may be used by the Obama administration as a means of implementing a medically induced “martial law”.

The doctor’s suspicions were validated, he said, when health officials told workers at his own health clinics that they were not to use the term “Ebola” when dealing with the public.

Dr. Lawrenzi’s claims mesh with reports published by the New York Post, who recently broke the story that New York City’s 911 operators have been banned from using the term “Ebola” over public radios. According to the Post’s report, a NYFD memo dictates that all employees refrain from using the word effective immediately. “At no point shall a dispatcher transmit over the radio any message containing the word ‘Ebola’ or related terminology,” said the memo. Instead dispatchers have been told to use the code letters “F/T,” as in Fever/Travel, to communicate that a person for which 911 has been called is demonstrating a fever and has a history of travel to West Africa.

“When flu season hits, people are going to be coming into the hospital for flu or Ebola, they’re not going to know what they have….it’s going to be a nightmare, every doctor I’ve spoken with is terrified of this fall” said Lawerenzi.

The doctor ended the interview by urging people to “stay away from places where there’s large groups of people,” including hospitals, he said, as the situation was “much more serious than they’re letting on.”

http://www.examiner.com/article/top-doctor-u-s-health-authorities-waging-mass-ebola-cover-up

http://www.amazon.com/AIDS-AND-EBOLA-Greatest-Medical-ebook/dp/B00QZCYMSS

The Girl At Midnight

For readers of Cassandra Clare’s City of Bones and Leigh Bardugo’s Shadow and Bone, The Girl at Midnight is the story of a modern girl caught in an ancient war.
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Beneath the streets of New York City live the Avicen, an ancient race of people with feathers for hair and magic running through their veins. Age-old enchantments keep them hidden from humans. All but one.

Echo is a runaway pickpocket who survives by selling stolen treasures on the black market, and the Avicen are the only family she’s ever known.
Echo is clever and daring, and at times she can be brash, but above all else she’s fiercely loyal. So when a centuries-old war crests on the borders of her home, she decides it’s time to act.

Legend has it that there is a way to end the conflict once and for all: find the Firebird, a mythical entity believed to possess power the likes of which the world has never seen. It will be no easy task, but if life as a thief has taught Echo anything, it’s how to hunt down what she wants . . . and how to take it.

But some jobs aren’t as straightforward as they seem. And this one might just set the world on fire.

The Author

Melissa

Melissa Grey was born and raised in New York City. She wrote her first short story at the age of twelve and hasn’t stopped writing since. After earning a degree in fine arts at Yale University, she traveled the world, then returned to New York City where she currently works as a freelance journalist. To learn more about Melissa, visit melissa-grey.com and follow @meligrey on Twitter.

http://www.amazon.com/Melissa-Grey/e/B00THGWX9O/