Do You Ever Dream Of Playing A Role In A Movie?

film 2We all enjoy watching exciting movies and our favorite film stars, to lively up ourselves, as a source of entertainment, after an exhausting day from work or to create a happy union with families, especially at weekends.

We learn a lot from the movies we watch, as they play with our emotions. Sometimes we do cry, get frightened or laugh our hearts out on some films, since some of the films are very hilarious.

As we enjoy watching films or entertain ourselves, have you ever wished or considered to play a role in a film or be an actor? Days back in the early seventies, there was a columnist, “Nana Ama advices you,” in one of the leading Ghanaian newspapers.

That could be the first time I read my letter in a newspaper when Nana Ama gave me the advice of how to become a successful film actor after I enquired from her what steps to take to become a film actor.

I watched my favorite television films, ‘Bonanza, The Mod Squad, High Chaparral, Cisco and Pancho, The Sea Way, The Saint, Department S, The Sea Way, The Persuaders etc, without the opportunity to reach Hollywood.

However, one day my dreams were fulfilled locally, when my father, a journalist and a documentary film producer and director, working at the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, offered me roles in two of his films, ‘Cocoa in Ghana and Backyard Industries,’ in the seventies. I was very happy indeed.

I believe that everyone has a talent or born with a talent. Some discover that talent early and others late. Unfortunately, some of these dreams can never be a reality, because there is no means, especially when you are born without a silver spoon in the mouth. But we can always contribute to shaping the life and pattern of people positively in the society. I am therefore happy to be a writer.

The Hunter Who Couldn’t Find The Leaf Of Life

Certain stories make your ears tingle and captures your attention

Two snakes fighting

Certain stories make your ears tingle, capture your attention and make you feel the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. Since childhood, I have heard certain stories from my original native country, Ghana. Many of these stories are real, like that of Okomfo Anokye, who danced and chanted down the golden stool from heaven. 

Since the golden stool is still available in the Ashanti Kingdom and the sword he planted and said no one can pull it out, still stands at the place, there is no room to say that the stories are untrue.

I still think about this story, because I don’t know if it’s true or false. A hunter went hunting for a deer to feed his family. It was very sunny, as usual in tropical Africa. Tired and thirsty, he leaned his back against a tree, as he sits in the shade of a very big tree. Adjacent him, he witnessed something he had never experienced in his entire life as a professional hunter.

The hunter was treated to a dramatic fight between two deadly snakes. The fight which lasted over thirty minutes resulted in the death of one of the snakes. The hunter wasn’t sure if the snake was actually dead or was in coma because the creature was lifeless and every effort of the other snake to revive the dead reptile or bring it back to life was futile.

The live snake abandoned its lifeless opponent and went into the bush. Less than a minute the reptile emerged from the bush with a leaf in its mouth and inserted into the mouth of the dead snake, then suddenly the creature woke up and the two retreated into the bush. The amazed hunter tried to find the leaf the snake brought to wake the dead, but his search yielded to fruitless result.

He was totally disappointed and frustrated, as the wise snake didn’t leave behind a piece of the leaf for him to identify what that magic leaf was.  Could that leaf wake up a dead body? That was the question spinning in his mind. This is more than a mystery. God will never reveal everything to man because of greed. The rich would have bought everything to live forever and the poor man would never get the chance to enjoy a second life.

Health: How Africans Survived On Traditional Medicine Long Before The White Man’s Medicine

Neem 1

The magic tree called Neem

In 1832, the Scottish merchant McGregor Laird led an expedition to the Niger Valley and out of 48 people that accompanied on the expedition, 37 lost their lives. These experiences led to the belief that Europeans could not survive in coastal West Africa, which came to be known as ‘The White Man’s Grave.’ Because Europeans noticed that Africans survived much better in the region from these fevers. Despite malaria killing many Africans as well, they acquired resistance to malaria in their childhood, baffling European physicians.

The loss of 37 expeditioners not only revealed that Europeans can’t settle in Africa that time but also demanded how Africans had been able to survive on that harsh continent of deadly malaria? From generation to generation, ancestors pass on their expertise in herbal medicine preparations to families. One of Africa’s powerful concoctions against malaria is prepared from leaves of a neem tree.

The neem tree, biological name (Azadirachta indica) is a unique tree, and the leaves are the most complex leaves on the planet. The neem tree has over 130 different biologically an active compound. The trees grow in tropical and semi-tropical regions.

About the Neem Tree:

Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a tree in the mahogany family. Native to India and throughout Southeast Asia, neem trees grow in tropical and semi-tropical regions. The neem tree grows quickly and can reach heights over 100 ft tall. With its surprising variety of uses and benefits, the neem tree is known as the ‘cure of sickness’ in West Africa, because of its extreme bitterness.

The main components of neem leaves include protein (7.1%), carbohydrates (22.9%), minerals, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin C, and carotene. But the leaves also contain glutamic acid, tyrosine, aspartic acid, alanine, praline, glutamine and cysteine-like amino acids, and several fatty acids. Without toothpaste or brush, a piece of chewed neem tree gives a clean teeth brush and fresh mouth each morning. Another life-saving tree is the Kuntan tree (Uapacca Guiniensis.) The cover of the tree was used to treat fractured bones.

Enjoying corn porridge without sugar

Asaba

The miracle berry or fruit, known as Asaba in the central region of Ghana, serves sugar because it contains a protein called miraculin that tastes sweet enough to replicate the effect of sugar.

There was no sugar, yet our ancestors enjoyed herbal tea and cornmeal porridge. A plant which bears small reddish fruit, called miracle fruit, serves as a substitute for sugar. The fruit contains a protein called miraculin that tastes sweet enough to replicate the effect of sugar. After eating berry fruit, everything sour, such as lemon or vinegar tastes sweet in the mouth.

Africa is endowed with many plants that can be used for medicinal. Some of the herbs heal high blood pressure, skin diseases, sore throat, arthritis, digestive problems etc. Many of the drugs consumed throughout the world for health purposes, were manufactured from herbs taken from Africa and Asia because those herbs grow in tropical countries. For example, African ginger is a very powerful medicine.

Many around the world wonder how Africans live, especially those in the villages without electricity. Frankly speaking, there is everything available to make life easy for them just like those living in modern cities. Before health centers were built our ancestors deliver babies at home successfully and the child’s umbilical cord was treated with herbal medicine.

Food Preservation in Africa

Have you ever wonder how Africans preserved food without electricity? If there is no electricity, there wouldn’t be any fridge or storage facilities but the food is best preserved in such a way that it doesn’t get rotten. With smoldering wood, generating intensive heat, which adds a layer of desiccation to preserving qualities, fish, meat and other kinds of seafood are smoked. The heat of the fire dehydrates all the liquid from the fish or meat and makes it last longer without rotten.

Salt and the sun also play a major role in traditional food preservation in Africa. For example, fish are well preserved with salt and Cocoa beans are spread in the sun to dry for many days, before they are exported or used to manufacture cocoa products, such as chocolates, drinks, beverages and body lotions consumed locally.

Fish 4

Fish smoking is one of the oldest traditional ways of food preservation in Ghana.

The Palm Tree: The Subsistence Of Life In Africa

Below is a link to another article revealing the traditional life in Africa.

https://joelsavage1.wordpress.com/2015/03/21/the-palm-tree-the-subsistence-of-life-in-africa/

Tame Your Tongue: The Mouth Is A Trouble Seeker

Mouth

According to the Cambridge English dictionary, the definition of the mouth is: The ​opening in the ​face of a ​person or ​animal, consisting of the ​lips and the ​space between them, or the ​space behind ​containing the ​teeth and the ​tongue. Other dictionaries simply define the mouth as: The opening through which food passes into the body.

I don’t agree with any of these definitions, because to me they are incomplete. If I were to define “The Mouth,” it should be: A small opening through which food passes into the body, speech; singing and noise are made and at the same time can put someone into a very big trouble.

The mouth serves man in his speech. He gets satisfaction after eating and drinking water. The beautiful songs or melodious tunes with words of comfort, all come from the mouth, making life worthy and happy to live, yet the same mouth can give one a lot of discomfort, worries, troubles, and even imprisonment.

In the Bible, there are so many warnings and pieces of advice over how people should tame the tongue. Here are just two of them. ‘Whoever keeps his mouth and his tongue keeps himself out of trouble. Proverbs 21:23. Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear. Ephesians 4:29.

In 1999, Glenn Hoddle lost his job as a coach to the England national team, after a shocking comment against disabled people. According to Glenn Hoddle “Disabled people are paying for sins in previous life.” Many people and the media rose against him, resulting to his dismissal from work. This is a typical example of the trouble the mouth can cause. Total disgrace and embarrassment aren’t it?

Bad comments always appear on social media and many passed unnoticed, but Liam Stacey spent 56 days in jail over his racial tweet against Bolton player Fabrice Muamba. Fabrice collapsed on the soccer field while playing, if Liam wasn’t prepared to wish him a speedy recovery, he shouldn’t say anything bad against the footballer at the point of death, instead he posted racial remarks on Twitter, provoking many people around the world.

This is not the first and the last careless talk or speech has cost people’s job or led one into jail. There is trouble brewing in every part of the world, and people’s life has been turned upside down, all because of what someone said to someone. I can say that there are two kinds of people. Those who think before they speak and those who speak before they think.

The latter one is those who are likely to be in trouble over what they say. In my country, there is a proverb which says “If you see a stone with a beard, just watch it and go. Don’t speak. This proverb is a warning to people who can’t shut their mouth.

There are many people who love to speak about other people. Even at work, many like to report other workers to the boss. In fact, just as some people are addicted to drug and alcohol, there are people also addicted to talking about other people. It’s their hobby and therefore can never stop.

Staying out of trouble is a simple rule to follow, yet many find it difficult to be trouble free. One of the rules which could keep people out of trouble is the practice of listening than speaking. An empty barrel makes a great noise. In life, great people do not speak much. They learn by listening.

It is better to be quiet for people to call you unsocial than to be called a gossiper, talkative and inquisitive. Proverbs 17:28. ‘Even a fool who keeps silent is considered wise, when he closes his lips, he is deemed intelligent.’

The Heart Has No Colour, No Country, No Religion, No Sex

Andrea 2

Andrea: Her wise comment inspired me to write this article.

I do write a lot, but I have to admit that some of my writings were created from comments of readers or my followers. As writers or bloggers, when we read comments on articles: How seriously do we take them, ponder over them to see their usefulness, significance and effect?

Many argue that it’s not good to make comment, but I say that It’s good to comment on articles, but if you don’t have anything significant to say, please shut your mouth, because your comment can give you the respect you deserve and the same comment can put you into a very big trouble, because of the bad things you said.

Believe me some comments worth more than silver and gold. It can change one’s life and the way you think, especially if you don’t have any love in your heart for someone. There are many problems and almost all these problems were caused by man. Pride, superiority and racism are some of the problems tearing our society apart today, yet no one wants to be called a racist.

Recently I posted an article captioned “Who Says There Is No Happiness Or Love In Africa?” The fact that Africa is a continent which has suffered a great deal of wars, ethnic conflicts, slavery and man-made diseases, many think they don’t have love for each other. Frankly speaking, a poor African can easily share his food with a friend, than a rich man in a developed country.

This particular article I wrote, didn’t generate much comment, but the only comment I had was awesome and inspiring. It touched my soul to read it over and over, allowing it to geminate in me, to add it to the little I have and share  with others.

According blogger Andrea, who runs this Italian blog: ‘Libera mente & Critica mente’:

Each person has a heart, and in each heart there is Love.

So everyone of us has Love in his/her heart.

The heart has no colour, no Country, no religion, no sex.

So Love has no colour, no Country, no religion, no sex.

Too many times, unfortunately, people forget to be human, and that have a heart…

https://liberamentecriticamente.wordpress.com/

I hope everyone agrees with me that this quotation or comment is awesome and carries wisdom? Thank you Andrea.