War In Syria A Bit Calm: UNICEF And WHO Are There, What Happens Next?

SYRIA
A Syrian child receiving oral vaccination against Polio.
By Joel Savage and Johan Van Dongen
Out of the suffering of others, many take the advantage to make profit, used the people to test drugs and commit every medical crime they find it hard to execute in Europe or in America.  You must have noticed that the war in Syria has stopped for a while. Unicef is bringing food… And the World Health Oranization? They are starting a vaccination campaign.
                          There is no journalist or scientist that is stupid, because both went to school to study, before stepping out to practise their professions. But like scientists, many journalists are liars. To them the lying is neccessary, just to suit their wimps and caprices, to remain ‘faithful’ to the media they are representing or protecting the government of their countries.
                           We (Micro-surgeon/scientist Johan Van Dongen and writer Joel Savage, are not working for any media, or afraid to lose our daily bread, so our articles are uncensored. We publish nothing but the truth, because ‘truth’ kills more than  the Kalashnikov, AK – 47.
                          World Health organization and Center for Diseases Control, are organizations people shouldn’t trust, especially by those from Third World Countries. Because of poverty and trust, whenever there is epidemic in Africa, the gate is widely opened for them and that’s where unsuspectingly, they get the chance to commit more medical crimes in Africa.
                             Our articles may sound stupid to many readers, but there are many people as well, who know the truthful nature of our articles. He who feels it knows it. If America and Europe had similarly suffered at the hands of Africa, they will understand, but because every crime is directed to poor Africa, the emerging stories are given less attention. Time changes and the table will over turn one day.
                             As the crisis in the Syrian Arab Republic deepens, for the sake of humanity, including children, UNICEF and its partners are committed to keeping  Syrian children from becoming a lost generation. A vaccination campaign against polio already started in Syria in 2013, with tha aim to vaccinate  over 2 million children under 5 years of age, but the following year, United Nations, stopped the vaccination, after at least 15 young children died.
                           The World Health Organization, part of the UN, said it’s investigating. Investigating what? Once a liar, always a liar and once a cheat, always a cheat. The world should epen their eyes to monitor the activities of World Health Oganization in Syria. We pray and hope after the war, no medical problem will emerge from Syria.

Ten Tips To Help Your Child Learn To Love Reading

Article originally posted by Ellen Buikema (Practical strategies for life)

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  1. Sing, play, and talk with your child. Children love to hear your voice. It doesn’t matter if you sing on or off key. Interaction is what children crave.
  2. Read aloud to your child every day. Reading to your child is the next best thing to a hug. Bring books along to the dentist, doctor, or on other errands where there will be some wait time. Read to children as part of a bedtime ritual. Routines are reassuring.
  3. Have a variety of reading material that is easily available. Place books in baskets in different parts of the home, including in the bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and TV areas. This allows children to choose books on their own and makes cleaning up after themselves easy. Consider putting together a backpack prefilled with books to grab and go for short or long distance travel.
  4. Read many types of books. Children love learning about their world, how things work, and all kinds of animals. Reading for information is important for childrens’ future. They love books with rhyme, silly words, and fairy tales. Start bringing your children to the library when they are young, and visit regularly.
  5. Pace the reading. Read with expression! Change the quality and volume of sound while reading to make listening to stories fun. Take your time, don’t rush. Stop now and then during reading time to let your child think about the story. Ask questions to encourage thinking.
  6. Repeat. Children enjoy reading favorite stories over and over again, even after they are able to repeat all the words by heart. Encourage them to read their favorite lines with you. Point to the words as you read them together. Talk about your child’s favorite characters in different contexts, like “What do you think The Cat in the Hat would do if he was in our kitchen right now?”
  7. Find words and letters everywhere. As early as age two, children may identify logos they see often at home and other places they travel. This important milestone is the beginning of the knowledge that print has meaning. Cereal boxes are great to use for finding letters and logos, as are menus, calendars and occupant mail. Take turns finding the same letter with your child. Write to do and grocery lists together. Have him make words with magnetic letters on the refrigerator.
  8. Help your child learn about letter sounds. Show her how to write her name. A child’s name is her first “stamp” on the world. Say the sounds of each letter as you print them. Sing an alphabet song and include the sounds of the letter in the song, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELlZKpi1Zs . Encourage your child to write but try not to correct him. Beginning writing should be playful.
  9. Limit tube time. Select TV programs with your child in advance. Watch TV and talk about the programs together. Monitor time on other electronic devices. Video games are good fun and many of them are educational, but balance is needed. Too much close work does not give the eyes enough exercise.
  10. Get involved with your child’s school. You are your child’s first and best advocate. Get to know your child’s teacher. Find out how you can support your child in her academic goals. If at all possible, volunteer time in the classroom. Work schedules make this difficult, but advance planning can help make this happen.

    You are your children’s first teacher. Reading to them is a great start in preparation for life in school and beyond.

    To find out more over this website: http://ellenbuikema.com/ten-tips-to-help-your-child-learn-to-love-reading/