Fresh Outbreak Of Ebola In Guinea

NEW EBOLA

Health workers are rushing to the site of a fresh Ebola outbreak in Guinea to bolster efforts to contain the virus and prepare for the likelihood of more cases, aid agencies said on Friday.

Four people in the southern region of Nzerekore were tested on Thursday and two of them were found to have Ebola. They were all from Korokpara, a village where three people from the same family have died in recent weeks from diarrhea and vomiting.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and aid agencies have sent experts to investigate the origin of the new cases and to identify, isolate, vaccinate and monitor all of their contacts.

The Alliance for International Medical Action (ALIMA) has reopened its Ebola treatment unit in Nzerekore, while the United Nations children’s agency (UNICEF) is reinforcing its team in the region and providing protective equipment and medicine.

“There has been a very professional and experienced response across the board,” said Augustin Augier of ALIMA, which admitted the two patients, a child and his mother, to its treatment unit.

“We are doing all we can to be ready to receive more cases,” he said, adding that ALIMA were flying in more staff from Paris.

More than 28,500 people have been infected and 11,300 have died since the world’s worst recorded Ebola epidemic began in December 2013 – mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

While the epidemic has come under control, experts have warned of the risk of new flare-ups, as Ebola can linger in the eyes, central nervous system and bodily fluids of survivors.

The two fresh cases in Nzerekore, where the Ebola outbreak began in 2013, were reported just hours after the WHO declared neighboring Sierra Leone’s latest flare-up over.

Guinea had been nearing the end of a 90-day period of heightened surveillance when the fresh cases were reported – the country’s first known re-emergence of Ebola after the outbreak was officially declared over there at the end of December 2015.

“The heightened surveillance means mechanisms were in place and that we were vigilant and prepared to deal with the flare-up,” said Guy Yogo, UNICEF’s deputy representative in Guinea.

“The population is now aware of the disease and listening to the guidance it receives from the authorities,” Yogo added.

It was not immediately clear how the villagers from Korokpara had contracted Ebola but the area had resisted efforts to fight the disease in the initial epidemic.

(Reporting By Kieran Guilbert, Editing by Ros Russell; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org)

HOW EBOLA KILLS 

The question the world needs an answer: If Aids and Ebola are not bio-weapons against Africa, why the disease keeps emerging after the World Health Organization and Center for Diseases Control declared Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone Ebola free countries?

“You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.” – Abraham Lincoln.

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks

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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. 

Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

The Author

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Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer whose articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; Discover; and others. She has worked as a correspondent for NPR’s Radiolab and PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW, and is a contributing editor at Popular Science magazine and guest editor of The Best American Science Writing 2011.
               She is a former Vice President of the National Book Critics Circle and has taught creative nonfiction and science journalism at the University of Memphis, the University of Pittsburgh, and New York University. Her debut book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, took more than ten years to research and write, and became an instant New York Times bestseller.
                She has been featured on numerous television shows, including CBS Sunday Morning and The Colbert Report. Her book has received widespread critical acclaim, with reviews appearing in The New Yorker, Washington Post, Science, Entertainment Weekly, People, and many others.
                It won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize, and was named The Best Book of 2010 by Amazon.com, and a Best Book of the Year by Entertainment Weekly; O, The Oprah Magazine; The New York Times; Washington Post; US News & World Report; and numerous others.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is being translated into more than twenty languages, and adapted into a young adult book, and an HBO film produced by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball. Skloot lives in Chicago but regularly abandons city life to write in the hills of West Virginia, where she tends to find stray animals and bring them home.

She travels extensively to speak about her book. For more information, visit RebeccaSkloot.com, where you will find book special features, including photos and videos, as well as her book tour schedule, and links to follow her and The Immortal Life on Twitter and Facebook.

Leave The Problems Behind And Take A Positive Step Into The Year 2016

Chearing 1Happiness and togetherness is all that we need to make this world beautiful

Many are  struggling  to overcome anxiety disorder, fear and uncertainty, only to get disappointing results, because crime, violence and terrorism are taking away our peaceful and happy moments.

The problem is that most people find it hard to overcome their fears, because it’s part of who they are. That’s actually a mistake. “No one drinks medicine on the behalf of a sick person,” a Ghanaian proverb, meaning your happiness is in your own hands.

At times sadness, loneliness and depression make us feel miserable and scared, because we don’t know what tomorrow may bring. If you take a wider view of things you could discover that dating and friendships seem to be disappointments. Many are hurt or recovering from love affair disasters. Why must my dates end in this way? This is one of the questions that usually follows.

Many times it may be differences of opinions, careers and misunderstandings, but at times it may turn out to be that the partners don’t like something about each other, especially about his or her character. Humbleness and politeness create a happy environment, but how many people there are polite and humble?

Within some few days, we shall be witnessing the new year (2016). Are you going to carry your problems along with you? We often allow problems to take its toll on us, than finding solutions.

If the blind can play the piano, someone without hands, can open the chapters of a book, with his toes or tongue, then why do you have to grumble when you are physically strong?

The purpose of this article is to encourage, not to discourage. There are many opportunities there for you. Let God be your guide to choose wisely and let your hopes and dreams be a reality in year 2016.

Health: How Africans Survived On Traditional Medicine Long Before The White Man’s Medicine

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The magic tree called Neem

In 1832, the Scottish merchant McGregor Laird led an expedition to the Niger Valley and out of 48 people that accompanied on the expedition, 37 lost their lives. These experiences led to the belief that Europeans could not survive in coastal West Africa, which came to be known as ‘The White Man’s Grave.’ Because Europeans noticed that Africans survived much better in the region from these fevers. Despite malaria killing many Africans as well, they acquired resistance to malaria in their childhood, baffling European physicians.

The loss of 37 expeditioners not only revealed that Europeans can’t settle in Africa that time but also demanded how Africans had been able to survive on that harsh continent of deadly malaria? From generation to generation, ancestors pass on their expertise in herbal medicine preparations to families. One of Africa’s powerful concoctions against malaria is prepared from leaves of a neem tree.

The neem tree, biological name (Azadirachta indica) is a unique tree, and the leaves are the most complex leaves on the planet. The neem tree has over 130 different biologically an active compound. The trees grow in tropical and semi-tropical regions.

About the Neem Tree:

Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a tree in the mahogany family. Native to India and throughout Southeast Asia, neem trees grow in tropical and semi-tropical regions. The neem tree grows quickly and can reach heights over 100 ft tall. With its surprising variety of uses and benefits, the neem tree is known as the ‘cure of sickness’ in West Africa, because of its extreme bitterness.

The main components of neem leaves include protein (7.1%), carbohydrates (22.9%), minerals, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin C, and carotene. But the leaves also contain glutamic acid, tyrosine, aspartic acid, alanine, praline, glutamine and cysteine-like amino acids, and several fatty acids. Without toothpaste or brush, a piece of chewed neem tree gives a clean teeth brush and fresh mouth each morning. Another life-saving tree is the Kuntan tree (Uapacca Guiniensis.) The cover of the tree was used to treat fractured bones.

Enjoying corn porridge without sugar

Asaba

The miracle berry or fruit, known as Asaba in the central region of Ghana, serves sugar because it contains a protein called miraculin that tastes sweet enough to replicate the effect of sugar.

There was no sugar, yet our ancestors enjoyed herbal tea and cornmeal porridge. A plant which bears small reddish fruit, called miracle fruit, serves as a substitute for sugar. The fruit contains a protein called miraculin that tastes sweet enough to replicate the effect of sugar. After eating berry fruit, everything sour, such as lemon or vinegar tastes sweet in the mouth.

Africa is endowed with many plants that can be used for medicinal. Some of the herbs heal high blood pressure, skin diseases, sore throat, arthritis, digestive problems etc. Many of the drugs consumed throughout the world for health purposes, were manufactured from herbs taken from Africa and Asia because those herbs grow in tropical countries. For example, African ginger is a very powerful medicine.

Many around the world wonder how Africans live, especially those in the villages without electricity. Frankly speaking, there is everything available to make life easy for them just like those living in modern cities. Before health centers were built our ancestors deliver babies at home successfully and the child’s umbilical cord was treated with herbal medicine.

Food Preservation in Africa

Have you ever wonder how Africans preserved food without electricity? If there is no electricity, there wouldn’t be any fridge or storage facilities but the food is best preserved in such a way that it doesn’t get rotten. With smoldering wood, generating intensive heat, which adds a layer of desiccation to preserving qualities, fish, meat and other kinds of seafood are smoked. The heat of the fire dehydrates all the liquid from the fish or meat and makes it last longer without rotten.

Salt and the sun also play a major role in traditional food preservation in Africa. For example, fish are well preserved with salt and Cocoa beans are spread in the sun to dry for many days, before they are exported or used to manufacture cocoa products, such as chocolates, drinks, beverages and body lotions consumed locally.

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Fish smoking is one of the oldest traditional ways of food preservation in Ghana.

The Palm Tree: The Subsistence Of Life In Africa

Below is a link to another article revealing the traditional life in Africa.

https://joelsavage1.wordpress.com/2015/03/21/the-palm-tree-the-subsistence-of-life-in-africa/

If One Pretends To Be Dead, Mourners Will Pretend To Bury You Alive

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Discussing your problems with someone you love is the best way to get help and solutions to the problem.

“If one pretends to be dead, mourners will pretend to bury you alive,” is one of the thousands of African proverbs meant to educate, shape our lives and inspire us, as each proverb carries a moral lesson, advice, and wisdom. This particular proverb speaks against pretending.

As imperfect human beings, we are responsible for both the good and bad things we do. Whichever way one takes it, to pretend is also considered to be something bad. The question is why do people pretend? According to a study, pretending has both advantages and disadvantages.

Sometimes one needs to pretend. For example, when all of a sudden in a cinema hall, a gunman on a shooting spree takes everyone by surprise without any escaping route, pretending to be dead among those already dead could save your life. But in other ways, pretending can cause self-destruction, depression, loneliness and other psychological problems. How?

The pressure in the society is enormous. Things are not going well, yet many people prefer to hide their problems behind a false smile. If you don’t share your problem with your family or a trustworthy friend, how can someone know your problem to give the attention or help you need? Researchers reveal that hiding a problem behind a false smile or faking happiness, is more likely to bring you harmful feelings.

You might not be happy with your job, because your boss or a colleague is sexually harassing you, exploiting you physically, emotionally and mentally, yet you wear a false smile behind such psychological scars. Instead of pretending to be okay, it’s always better to tell your problem to someone to receive help.

Many wish to be someone, because of the extravagant lives other people live. But we must be careful about what we sometimes wish for. We must be content with whatever we have to live a happy life. Don’t let your neighbor’s expensive car, push you to live beyond your means, and put on a fake smile, deceiving people that you are living great, while you know that you are struggling to make ends meet.

In Africa and other countries around the world, many are believed to be sick of HIV but scared to go and see the doctor, because they aren’t ready to be told they have contracted HIV or Aids.  They rather prefer to hide their problems with a fake smile, forgetting that no one drinks medicine on the behalf of a sick person.

To pretend that everything is okay, while suffering, is not good for our health, we must, therefore, confine our problems to those close to us for help and solutions. That’s the only way we can overcome and defeat our problems.

Brave Doctors Speak Out Against Dangers Of Vaccines

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Medical crime is pharmaceutical business: Healthy happy children don’t need dubious or contaminated vaccines.

The following doctors were not satisfied with all the lies, propaganda and half-truths surrounding vaccines.

Article originally published by YourNewsWire.Com

Having done their own research, they were all prepared to speak out about what they found.

Investmentwatchblog.com reports:

Nancy Banks, M.D.

Dr. Banks earned her medical degree at Harvard Medical School. She also earned an MBA in finance from Pace university. She completed her internship and residency at Saint Luke’s Hospital and Mount Sinai Hospital and Medical Center. She is a board certified ObGyn.

If you look at the ingredients of vaccines you’ll find that they have mercury, and they have aluminum and the vaccines are polluted with other kinds of viruses and the vaccines are grown, sometimes on human tissue. So these are vaccines that have elements that are neurotoxic and then of course they have other elements that can set up autoimmune reactions. So those are the kinds of things that we’re seeing in the children; we are seeing autoimmune reactions.

Toni Bark, M.D.

Dr. Bark has earned a B.S. in psychology from the University of Illinois, and her M.D. from Rush Medical School. She completed her Pediatric Residency at the University of Illinois. After directing the Pediatric Emergency Room at Michael Reese Hospital, she began her study of homeopathic medicine. She has also earned a masters degree in healthcare emergency management from Boston University. In 2012 she became Vice President of the American Institute of Homeopathy. A highly educated physician, she has done the research.

…The kids that come to me from other practices and are fully vaccinated often are the kids, well they are the kids in my practice with asthma, panic disorders, OCD, PANDAS [pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections], autism, Asperger’s. My kids who never have been vaccinated in my practice, I don’t see those issues. I don’t have one child who was not vaccinated who also has asthma or food allergies or Asperger’s or autism or Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis.

Meryl Nass, M.D., ABIM

Meryl Nass is no stranger to research. She earned a B.S. in biology from MIT. She worked as a lab technician for two years in the Immunology Department at John Curtin School of Medical Research. She earned her medical degree from the New Jersey Medical School and the University of Mississippi Medical School. She completed her internal medicine residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Afterwards, she worked as an emergency room physician for 14 years. She also taught internal medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She currently works as an internist and hospital list at Mount Desert Island Hospital in Bar Harbor Maine.

Prevnar was licensed with a big clinical trial conducted at Kaiser in Northern California with 38,000 children. Half received the Prevnar 7 vaccine, and half received an experimental vaccine for Neisseria meningitidis type C – type C meningococcal vaccine.Now, that seemed a little odd to me. I mean…the control was another vaccine. That’s a problem. But that’s pretty common, because you don’t really know what the side effect profile is if you compare one vaccine to another, because each causes side effects. You don’t have an inert placebo for comparison.

…Children don’t usually die suddenly when they’re healthy; and you have to find a reason for that. There are certainly lots of teenage girls who have died relatively suddenly after Gardasil or developed severe neurological reactions.

Jack Wolfson, D.O.

Dr. Wolfson earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois. Afterwards he earned D.O. at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is board certified in cardiology. Before meeting his future wife, Heather, he began to realize that conventional medicine was not preventing disease or curing disease, but merely treating the symptoms. Heather, a chiropractor, brought him into the world of holistic healing. He and Heather are now married with two kids, and neither of them are unvaccinated..

A prestigious journal reported that men who had measles and mumps as children suffered 29% less heart attacks and 17% less strokes! Women with a history of both infections had a 17% lower risk of cardiovascular disease and 21% lower risk of stroke. The journal Atherosclerosis recently published these shocking findings in the June 2015 issue (1).

By my calculations, natural infection with the measles and mumps will prevent millions of heart attacks and strokes. Why is this information not all over the TV and Internet? I will tell you why. Because mainstream media is in bed with Big Pharma who pay their bills. The politicians are slaves to their corporate masters. Our children should be exposed to every virus and bacteria for which a vaccine exists.

Lee Hieb, M.D.

Dr. Hieb received her undergraduate from Grinell College and the University of Iowa. She earned her M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. She did her orthopedic surgical residency with the U.S. Navy. She is a former president of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, and she frequently speaks out against the perils of government-run health care. She ran for Governor in 2014 as a libertarian. Unfortunately, she lost the election.

Since 2005 (and even before that), there have been no deaths in the U.S. from measles, but there have been 86 deaths from MMR vaccine – 68 of them in children under 3 years old. And there were nearly 2,000 disabled, per the aforementioned VAERS data.

In countries which use BCG vaccinations against tuberculosis, the incidence of Type I diabetes in children under 14 is nearly double.

As reported in Lancet in 1995, inflammatory bowel disease (i.e. Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis) is 13 times more prevalent in persons vaccinated for measles.

…In 1982 William Torch, a prolific researcher and publisher on Neurologic topics, presented a paper (later published) at the American Academy of Neurology reviewing SIDS deaths. He reported that in 100 consecutive cases, 70 percent of SIDS deaths occurred within three weeks of pertussis vaccination.

Tears On The Equator

A powerful autobiographical tale of spiritual struggle on an equatorial African island.

 

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In the beginning, in 1973, when a young couple met at a seminary in the city of Boston, during a time of great racial tension over an issue called bussing, they dared to share a dream and the dream was about faith, progress, unity, love and sustainable development in Africa. She trained in education, her Canadian husband schooled in medicine.

They would return to the Ugandan paradise island of her youth in Lake Victoria only to discover that beauty hid the beast; that an interracial couple, white and black and their Ancient Orthodox faith would cause a spark which turned verdant fields into flames of conflict. Truths would be told and taboos would be broken. Courage would be unveiled and passions uncovered.

This story is about the glue that maintained the vision until time, politics and war wore it away. It is also about survival and rebirth and the ultimate seeds which gave birth to a new crop of hopes.  “What are you looking at old man?” the young doctor queried. The elder was looking into a rotten log. “I am seeing the face of God,” he smiled standing up, allowing the doctor to see the sun kissed orchid.”

“The face of God,” he said, and so it was, for their five years on Bukasa island uncovered the weaknesses and strengths of this couple and the community around them. That they would fail was inevitable, but that they would survive in a real and mystical way was the hidden treasure.

The Author

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Gerasimos I. Kambites was born in Montreal in 1947. He is a third generation Greek Canadian. Raised in his father’s corner store he read every comic book and most magazines and books that came through the store for 15 years. He went to Sir George Williams University in Montreal from 1965 – 1969, then worked as a Parliamentary journalist for United Press International 1969 – 1973.

He wrote two stories for National Geographic and produced an audio documentary on Mount Athos: In the Fullness of Truth, for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He was a videographer for the world’s longest snowmobile expedition in 1973, the Transworld Snowmobile Expedition. That experience led him to Holy Cross Seminary in Brookline, Massachusetts.  He then spent six months in Sinai’s St. Katherine’s Monastery.

Having earned a Master’s in Divinity, he went on to medical school at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario before heading to Uganda. He was ordained to the priesthood by the late Metropolitan Vitaly, founded Annunciation Orthodox Church on Bukasa Island and St. Xenia’s of St. Petersburg in Ottawa, eventually leaving the priesthood.

He studied psychiatry in the early nineties and now works as an Orthodox psychotherapist. He and his wife, Ann, are members of Christ the Saviour Orthodox Church in Ottawa. They raise sheep and horses on a farm on the internationally acclaimed Rideau River and Canal System, and continue to support Father Christopher Walusimbi on Bukasa Island.

In 2008 Dr. Kambites took part in National Geographic’s  Genographic DNA tracking program. The greatest irony for him is that his genetic map marks him as having originated in East Africa, in the Northern part of Lake Victoria. By moving to Uganda, in a true sense, he was just coming home.

http://www.amazon.com/Tears-Equator-Gerasimos-I-Kambites/dp/1460245024/