Ten Tips To Help Your Child Learn To Love Reading

Article originally posted by Ellen Buikema (Practical strategies for life)

Read 3

  1. Sing, play, and talk with your child. Children love to hear your voice. It doesn’t matter if you sing on or off key. Interaction is what children crave.
  2. Read aloud to your child every day. Reading to your child is the next best thing to a hug. Bring books along to the dentist, doctor, or on other errands where there will be some wait time. Read to children as part of a bedtime ritual. Routines are reassuring.
  3. Have a variety of reading material that is easily available. Place books in baskets in different parts of the home, including in the bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and TV areas. This allows children to choose books on their own and makes cleaning up after themselves easy. Consider putting together a backpack prefilled with books to grab and go for short or long distance travel.
  4. Read many types of books. Children love learning about their world, how things work, and all kinds of animals. Reading for information is important for childrens’ future. They love books with rhyme, silly words, and fairy tales. Start bringing your children to the library when they are young, and visit regularly.
  5. Pace the reading. Read with expression! Change the quality and volume of sound while reading to make listening to stories fun. Take your time, don’t rush. Stop now and then during reading time to let your child think about the story. Ask questions to encourage thinking.
  6. Repeat. Children enjoy reading favorite stories over and over again, even after they are able to repeat all the words by heart. Encourage them to read their favorite lines with you. Point to the words as you read them together. Talk about your child’s favorite characters in different contexts, like “What do you think The Cat in the Hat would do if he was in our kitchen right now?”
  7. Find words and letters everywhere. As early as age two, children may identify logos they see often at home and other places they travel. This important milestone is the beginning of the knowledge that print has meaning. Cereal boxes are great to use for finding letters and logos, as are menus, calendars and occupant mail. Take turns finding the same letter with your child. Write to do and grocery lists together. Have him make words with magnetic letters on the refrigerator.
  8. Help your child learn about letter sounds. Show her how to write her name. A child’s name is her first “stamp” on the world. Say the sounds of each letter as you print them. Sing an alphabet song and include the sounds of the letter in the song, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELlZKpi1Zs . Encourage your child to write but try not to correct him. Beginning writing should be playful.
  9. Limit tube time. Select TV programs with your child in advance. Watch TV and talk about the programs together. Monitor time on other electronic devices. Video games are good fun and many of them are educational, but balance is needed. Too much close work does not give the eyes enough exercise.
  10. Get involved with your child’s school. You are your child’s first and best advocate. Get to know your child’s teacher. Find out how you can support your child in her academic goals. If at all possible, volunteer time in the classroom. Work schedules make this difficult, but advance planning can help make this happen.

    You are your children’s first teacher. Reading to them is a great start in preparation for life in school and beyond.

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Tame Your Tongue: The Mouth Is A Trouble Seeker

Mouth

According to the Cambridge English dictionary, the definition of the mouth is: The ​opening in the ​face of a ​person or ​animal, consisting of the ​lips and the ​space between them, or the ​space behind ​containing the ​teeth and the ​tongue. Other dictionaries simply define the mouth as: The opening through which food passes into the body.

I don’t agree with any of these definitions, because to me they are incomplete. If I were to define “The Mouth,” it should be: A small opening through which food passes into the body, speech; singing and noise are made and at the same time can put someone into a very big trouble.

The mouth serves man in his speech. He gets satisfaction after eating and drinking water. The beautiful songs or melodious tunes with words of comfort, all come from the mouth, making life worthy and happy to live, yet the same mouth can give one a lot of discomfort, worries, troubles, and even imprisonment.

In the Bible, there are so many warnings and pieces of advice over how people should tame the tongue. Here are just two of them. ‘Whoever keeps his mouth and his tongue keeps himself out of trouble. Proverbs 21:23. Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear. Ephesians 4:29.

In 1999, Glenn Hoddle lost his job as a coach to the England national team, after a shocking comment against disabled people. According to Glenn Hoddle “Disabled people are paying for sins in previous life.” Many people and the media rose against him, resulting to his dismissal from work. This is a typical example of the trouble the mouth can cause. Total disgrace and embarrassment aren’t it?

Bad comments always appear on social media and many passed unnoticed, but Liam Stacey spent 56 days in jail over his racial tweet against Bolton player Fabrice Muamba. Fabrice collapsed on the soccer field while playing, if Liam wasn’t prepared to wish him a speedy recovery, he shouldn’t say anything bad against the footballer at the point of death, instead he posted racial remarks on Twitter, provoking many people around the world.

This is not the first and the last careless talk or speech has cost people’s job or led one into jail. There is trouble brewing in every part of the world, and people’s life has been turned upside down, all because of what someone said to someone. I can say that there are two kinds of people. Those who think before they speak and those who speak before they think.

The latter one is those who are likely to be in trouble over what they say. In my country, there is a proverb which says “If you see a stone with a beard, just watch it and go. Don’t speak. This proverb is a warning to people who can’t shut their mouth.

There are many people who love to speak about other people. Even at work, many like to report other workers to the boss. In fact, just as some people are addicted to drug and alcohol, there are people also addicted to talking about other people. It’s their hobby and therefore can never stop.

Staying out of trouble is a simple rule to follow, yet many find it difficult to be trouble free. One of the rules which could keep people out of trouble is the practice of listening than speaking. An empty barrel makes a great noise. In life, great people do not speak much. They learn by listening.

It is better to be quiet for people to call you unsocial than to be called a gossiper, talkative and inquisitive. Proverbs 17:28. ‘Even a fool who keeps silent is considered wise, when he closes his lips, he is deemed intelligent.’