Life As Immigrant At The Notorious Pantanella In Via Casilina Rome

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma Novembre 1990 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan, Bangladesh, Africani tra cui (Joel Savage) Panoramica della Pantanella. Rome

As a child growing up in a strongly religious family, I was thought that everything which is opposite to the teachings of the Holy Bible, including laziness is a sin. I tried my best to live a clean life. We were thought to believe that Israel, Jerusalem, and other Biblical countries were all in heaven, without a slight knowledge those countries were on the same earth we are living today.

When I left my family looking for a job, I tried to be sincere and prevented doing anything wrong which could land me in jail. I read that jail changes people’s attitude to be good or worse. But I wasn’t interested to know the positive or negative influences of jail on people. My only interest is never to be there because it’s not the right place for me.

In the year 1990, from Lagos, Nigeria, I made a transit in Rome, on my way to German. In Rome, I was detained at the Fiumicino airport. The Italian immigration regularly does that to many foreigners, especially Africans. Like a tourist, I walked around the airport lounge without a room to sleep and food for three days. On the third, I was really starving, so I approached one of the immigration officials and said to him that I am hungry. He looked at my face and asked me “Am I your father?” Then he walked away.

Without knowing what the officials have in store for me, I handed over an application for asylum as a journalist and it worked, because I have some few publications over my profession on me. On the fourth day, from nowhere came one of the immigration officers, he said to me: “Your application has been accepted, today the police will come to take you to Rome.” I was shocked beyond expression.

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.

 The good Samaritan didn’t only deliver the unexpected message, but he pulled out from his pocket a number of notes and said to me: “I don’t want my colleagues to see me giving you money, buy some food to eat at the airport.” I didn’t take the money. I told him: “This important information you have given to me has taken all the hunger away, thank you.” He walked away with his money.

On the fourth day, the police came, just as the officer told me and took me in a police car to the city, Rome, and left me there to fight for my survival. Without anywhere to sleep, I passed all my nights at the Central Train Station. Among other Africans, we watched a big television screen during the day to forget our misery, then in the night, I go to sleep at my hiding place. The police and the workers at the train station never discovered the place I slept.

After some time, I discovered places where I could eat every day without paying for food. I could take my bath and take some clothes. One of such places was at ‘Via Dandolo.’ Daniela, the head of the Caritas (Charity) at Via Dandolo, was a very good woman, but one of her female workers was a very bad woman. A thief. Since we had no address, our letters passed through the Caritas at Via Dandola and this woman took the opportunity to steal money from our letters.

I caught her twice, so I wasn’t surprised when I lost the 10 pounds a friend sent me from England, but I didn’t tell Daniela about it. Through the Caritas, I had my initial lessons and attended classes to learn the Italian. I was one of the best immigrants who could write and speak the language fluently, yet my life was miserable because I was still sleeping at the train station.

In Rome, I was robbed, admitted and operated at a hospital, but the nurse refused to touch me, because of my color, thus; every morning when on duty, she calls someone to attend to me, but she had time for every Italian patient at the hospital. I was once sitting in the hospital’s garden after the operation, when an Italian old man, one of the patients came close to me, looked at my face and said to me: “Marocchino motaccizoa.” – an insult, after mistakenly taken me as a Moroccan. I didn’t say a word.

Then all of a sudden, as if it was announced on the radio, all the immigrants in Rome, without accommodation, discovered an abandoned Pasta factory called ‘Pantanella.’ Pantanella is notoriously known for all criminal activities, including drug peddling and crime, similar to drug cartel zones of Mexico. One needs strength, courage, heart and braveness to survive at that place. Italians think they are brave, but many of them dare to pass Via Casilina, the street Pantanella is located in the night.

That was the place I lived and worked as a toilet cleaner for thousands of immigrants, using six containers as toilets, to raise money to feed. I was employed by the Muslim head at the place. It’s terrible and frightening to live at Pantenella. It wasn’t a prison, but the place, I think was tough like Alcatraz, because of the criminal activities many illegal immigrants engaged in feeding.

 

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Scoppia un incendio durante lo sgombero Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.A fire during the evacuation

The abandoned factory accommodated both soft and hardened criminals from various countries, including Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Africa etc. I lived in Pantanella for four months, and the Italian government tired of the crimes going on in that abandoned Pasta factory ejected all the foreigners.

But the Italian government did something great for the African immigrants. Something we weren’t expecting. The government paid for two weeks stay in a hotel for all the Africans, with the ultimatum that before the two weeks expired, we should find a place on our own to live.

Through a very good sympathetic woman called Nana, (she died in Rome a few years ago) I got a job as a houseboy to serve one journalist called Claudio Lavazza, working at television station TG2, belonging to the former Italian Prime Minister, Sylvio Berlusconi. He provided me accommodation and paid me well. Besides, he gave me the new version of Fiat Cinque Cento (500) to drive. It may be likely that I was the first black man in the entire Italy to drive the new Fiat Cinque Cento when it freshly came out. I met other journalist friends of Claudio, including Michele Cucuzza.

After three years, I said goodbye to Rome and returned to Africa. I married and returned to Europe once again but this time choosing Amsterdam. ‘Overseas Chronicle: The Rome and Amsterdam Experience’ is a book once started you’ll find it hard to put away, because of the shocking intriguing stories in the book. Find out more of what happened to me in Rome and later in Holland, which led me to detention in Amsterdam.

 

Come sono sopravvissuto come un immigrato nella Pantanella pericoloso può essere letto in: 
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Certain Mails Can Give You Tears Of Joy

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I’m sure every writer, once or many times in his or her life time may receive a mail from someone interested in his work or articles. I have received hundreds of mails of admiration over my writings. One of the mails I received recently touched me after reading. I decided to publish it…

As writer, there are certain things you need to keep in mind. You can’t please everyone. Many will like you and others will hate you, but don’t let those little impediments distract your attention or hurt your feelings.

Many writers or bloggers avoid getting into conflict with readers or try to write articles not to offend others, but at times your article will spark controversy, arguments and hatred, when you aren’t expecting it.

I had a big problem on LinkedIn’s platform when I wrote an article entitled ‘Why many Africans are allergic to reading? The aim of the article is to encourage reading, but it turned out to be an article which nearly caused my crucifixion or lynching by some Africans that find the article unsavory.

When you find yourself in such a situation, don’t lose your temper, remain calm and try to explain the significance of the article. You may receive negative comments, yet still be positive. You may lose some followers, but don’t let that bother you, because those that aren’t ready to learn, aren’t also ready to accept any explanation.

This one of my favorite mails last week.

Hi Joel

Just extending my appreciation of your work.  I have read some articles of yours and your interview with Magda Cristina Butucea.  It was poignant!  To know that we still have those who believe in the truth among the profession is consolatory.  I am what you will call a misdirected man (turning 50 soon).

I spent time chasing something I never believed in but thought it was the means to an end – the empowerment of Africans in Europe.  It was a delusion and spent time in prison through malicious prosecutions.  Like you, I loved writing since I was in my primary school years.  I helped write letters for those who could not read to their families who where faraway from their places of work.

I neglected this part of me.  I have decided to spend time doing it now and set up a publishing company with a focus on selling African literature and the creation of educational projects in the form of publications to help spread the truth about our history.  Once again, I am inspired and honoured to read about you.

Best Regards Chez Winakabs

NB. I give thanks to Chez Winakabs. I wish this article will encourage other bloggers or writers experiencing many obstacles to continue writing without ceasing. 

Ten Tips To Help Your Child Learn To Love Reading

Article originally posted by Ellen Buikema (Practical strategies for life)

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  1. Sing, play, and talk with your child. Children love to hear your voice. It doesn’t matter if you sing on or off key. Interaction is what children crave.
  2. Read aloud to your child every day. Reading to your child is the next best thing to a hug. Bring books along to the dentist, doctor, or on other errands where there will be some wait time. Read to children as part of a bedtime ritual. Routines are reassuring.
  3. Have a variety of reading material that is easily available. Place books in baskets in different parts of the home, including in the bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and TV areas. This allows children to choose books on their own and makes cleaning up after themselves easy. Consider putting together a backpack prefilled with books to grab and go for short or long distance travel.
  4. Read many types of books. Children love learning about their world, how things work, and all kinds of animals. Reading for information is important for childrens’ future. They love books with rhyme, silly words, and fairy tales. Start bringing your children to the library when they are young, and visit regularly.
  5. Pace the reading. Read with expression! Change the quality and volume of sound while reading to make listening to stories fun. Take your time, don’t rush. Stop now and then during reading time to let your child think about the story. Ask questions to encourage thinking.
  6. Repeat. Children enjoy reading favorite stories over and over again, even after they are able to repeat all the words by heart. Encourage them to read their favorite lines with you. Point to the words as you read them together. Talk about your child’s favorite characters in different contexts, like “What do you think The Cat in the Hat would do if he was in our kitchen right now?”
  7. Find words and letters everywhere. As early as age two, children may identify logos they see often at home and other places they travel. This important milestone is the beginning of the knowledge that print has meaning. Cereal boxes are great to use for finding letters and logos, as are menus, calendars and occupant mail. Take turns finding the same letter with your child. Write to do and grocery lists together. Have him make words with magnetic letters on the refrigerator.
  8. Help your child learn about letter sounds. Show her how to write her name. A child’s name is her first “stamp” on the world. Say the sounds of each letter as you print them. Sing an alphabet song and include the sounds of the letter in the song, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELlZKpi1Zs . Encourage your child to write but try not to correct him. Beginning writing should be playful.
  9. Limit tube time. Select TV programs with your child in advance. Watch TV and talk about the programs together. Monitor time on other electronic devices. Video games are good fun and many of them are educational, but balance is needed. Too much close work does not give the eyes enough exercise.
  10. Get involved with your child’s school. You are your child’s first and best advocate. Get to know your child’s teacher. Find out how you can support your child in her academic goals. If at all possible, volunteer time in the classroom. Work schedules make this difficult, but advance planning can help make this happen.

    You are your children’s first teacher. Reading to them is a great start in preparation for life in school and beyond.

    To find out more over this website: http://ellenbuikema.com/ten-tips-to-help-your-child-learn-to-love-reading/

FDA threatens three companies with criminal charges for making Ebola treatment claims (but won’t test natural substances against Ebola)

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Article originally posted by NaturalNews.Com

In furtherance of the medical monopoly that dominates western civilization today, the FDA issued warning letters to three companies over what they call fraudulent health claims regarding Ebola treatments.
The warning letters, viewable here, single out the Natural Solutions Foundation (Rima Laibow) and two essential oil companies “Young Living” and “doTerra” whose distributors, the FDA says, were making claims that their oils could treat or prevent Ebola.

The warning letters threaten all three companies with possible criminal prosecutions if they do not immediately answer the FDA and FTC with explanations of how they plan to halt the making of such claims. As of this writing, the e-commerce website of the Natural Solutions Foundation appears to have already removed any mention of Ebola.

“An FDA agent showed up at my front door on September 23, 2014, to hand deliver [highly unusual!] a Warning Letter from that agency and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) advising Natural Solutions that telling the truth about Ebola, Nano Silver and CBD is, according to those agencies, against their version of the law,” wrote Ralph Fucetola in this rebuttal letter entitled “We will not be suppressed!”

http://www.naturalnews.com/047016_ebola_treatments_warning_letters_unproven_cures.html#

The Scent of My Son, In God We Trust

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“The Scent of My Son, In God we Trust” is a true story about a mother’s quest for justice for her beloved son. Joseph Miranda was brutally killed at the age of 19 while working for a landscaping company. Adrienne Miranda, his mother, knew that after many meetings with police and other government entities in Maryland that nothing they were telling her made any sense. She researched, wrote numerous letters, made countless phone calls and attended several meetings.
These public servants resisted Adrienne’s efforts and valid questions. They lied repeatedly, withheld crucial police reports, withheld crime scene photographs from the Medical Examiners and ignored her.

Adrienne Miranda worked diligently and all she ever wanted was truth and justice for Joseph. She vowed to be his voice and promised to never, never give up…never. Once Adrienne was able to obtain the necessary reports and evidence needed she met with the Medical Examiners in Maryland. They reviewed and examined everything and concluded Joseph’s death was a homicide by assault. Joseph’s death certificate is recorded in vital records and confirms that a crime definitely occurred that took Joseph’s young life.

However, the opposition and adversity that Adrienne and her family faced from local and state prosecutors was and is unconscionable. They committed despicable malfeasance and twisted and distorted tactics. The local state prosecutor wrote in a letter to the Chief Medical Examiner and his Assistant that he did not agree with their conclusion of homicide and states Joseph’s death was an accident. Despite all of the physics, evidence, forensics and scientific proof, the local and state prosecutors went against the highly qualified and exceptionally skilled coroners and their confirmed conclusion.

It will be eight years on July 20th since Adrienne and her family have survived this living nightmare. The only thing that has kept Adrienne strong and moving forward is her undying love for Joseph and her love and unshakable faith in Almighty God. She knows that with God all things are possible and that our Lord has called her to respond and to act. She trust in the Lord with all of her mind, heart, body and soul.

Take the journey with us. The story is true, compelling, intriguing and inspiring. You will be lifted up and feel hope, love, courage and an awakening. Always and forever keep the faith.

The Author

Miranda

Adrienne Miranda was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1955. She was raised in a loving, kind and compassionate family. Her parents instilled a strong foundation of faith and love for the Lord.

She married and later became a mother in 1984 and again gave birth to her second son in 1987. Adrienne always loved words, poetry and grew into an extrovert due to her professional positions that included public speaking and communications.

Her most important role in her life is that of being a loving and hands on “Mom”. In 2006 her son, Joseph, was brutally murdered at the age of 19. His death has been surrounded by corruption and a cover up.

Adrienne vowed to be the voice of her beloved Joseph and has written her true and compelling story in “The Scent of My Son, In God we Trust”. She remains steadfast in her quest for Justice for Joseph.

http://www.amazon.com/Scent-My-Son-God-Trust/dp/0692359168/