Introducing The Writer Died By Joel Savage

NORA 3By Nuala E. Moran

 

About The Writer Died by Joel Savage

Kumbe finds himself in a hostile environment, as a victim of divorce and neglect. An environment he witnesses the suffering and hustling his mother goes through to feed him. He was unhappy because his father was neglecting his family, spending his fortune on other women. He sees his adolescence as a struggle to win the support of his father. At school, he was among the best students. This gives him inspiration to fight to educate himself. In a confused society, Kumbe spends a better part of his life visiting the library, reading and studying.

Despite daily horrendous life he passes through, Kumbe excels to be an outstanding journalist and writer, attached to the president of his native country, Ghana, with enormous enthusiasm and optimism. However, in his lifetime as a famous journalist, his fame gives him nothing but hatred, jealousy and blackmail from an empire of deceitful enemies. He stands strong and firm, destined to fight the cruel charismatic power of those forces haunting him. But they are stronger than him.

Despite his wife’s moral and material support, Kumbe surrenders and dies mysteriously. Who and what killed him? “The Writer Died” is a truly remarkable book of hard life experience of child neglect, an indispensable and inspiring book for anyone that may find himself in a similar situation. The writer tries to define, measure, classify, and understand what child neglect is like in Africa.

About the Author of The Writer Died, Joel Savage.

Joel Savage is an author and freelance journalist, who enjoys the challenges of creativity and adventure. His work is considered to be pure genre of creative nonfiction of human touch, with appeal to a broad general audience.

He was born in the central region of Ghana, Cape Coast, on January 19, 1957 and studied at Ebenezer Secondary School and Accra High School. He later studied at Ghana Institute of Journalism. He wrote feature articles for the Daily Graphic, the Ghanaian Times, and the Weekly Spectator in Accra for a certain period.

Joel lives in Antwerp, Belgium, with his wife and three children, where he writes for Diplomatic Aspects Newspaper.

Where to buy The Writer Died by Joel Savage.

Visit Joel Savage’s Author Page on oAuthor to find all links for locations of this and other works by Joel Savage.

K. B. Asante: Voice From Afar And Still Heard

In the early nineties, while contributing regularly to the features column of the Daily Graphic, in Accra, Ghana, as a freelance journalist, great articles from certain columnists caught my attention. Apart from columnists George Sydney Abugri and Frankie Asare-Donkoh, K. B Asante’s  ‘Voice From Afar’ also played a significant role in my life, as an aspiring writer.

Asante

I’m very pleased to feature this great Ghanaian writer on my blog today. It is likely that the former Ghanaian diplomat, successfully published all his interesting articles as a book, giving it the same name as his column in the Daily Graphic.

One of his articles which appeared in the Daily Graphic, on October 20, 2014 was:

Voice from Afar: Was Nkrumah a dictator?

Asante 2

Those who do not wish to face facts or observe and think say that Nkrumah could have been the leader Ghana needed and needs but for his dictatorship. Others deplore his flouting of the laws and the Preventive Detention Act.

Few who believe in the rule of law will applaud the Preventive Detention Act, but it was passed by the people’s representatives in Parliament and its application by Nkrumah was lawful. Needless to state that many high personalities used it to settle old scores or put away the troublesome. But I defy anyone to point out any illegal Act by Nkrumah.

We are, therefore, left with the charge of dictatorship.  With regard to this, the definition of dictator I like is “someone who tells people what to do and refuses to listen to their opinions.”

To me a leader should have the courage, for example, to tell the people to keep their surroundings clean to avoid cholera and other avoidable epidemics which are no respecter of persons.

He should see to it that rules are made to enforce what should be done.  Those who flout the rules should be punished whether they threaten to vote against the leader or not.

The leader should listen to the views of the people but should have the courage of his convictions and persuade the people to do the right thing and to punish those who do not do so according to law.

Kwame Nkrumah went in for a one party state because he wanted to appoint the competent in the “opposition” to key positions in the interest of national progress.  The party “big men” opposed this.  He could have overruled them if he was a dictator but he wanted a way out which did not destroy party solidarity and hence his recourse to a one party state.

An interesting example of his desire to maintain consensus and not to resort to dictatorial rule was the surprise announcements at 1:00 p.m.  It used to be said that many ministers did not take their lunch until after the 1:00 p.m. G.B.C. news.  They would then know whether they were still ministers or not.

President Nkrumah had a strict regime of work.  He was in the office at 7:30 a.m.  He generally dealt with African Affairs from 7:30 a.m.–9:00 a.m. and went on with home or national affairs from 9:00 am. to 11:00 a.m.  Foreign and International Affairs followed from 11:00 a.m.– 12:30 p.m.

Major decisions on the national scene were formulated at about 10: 00 am  No sooner had the President suggested changes in ministerial appointments and administration than delegates of the party arrived to see Osagyefo urgently.

The delegation praised the work of the minister who was to be removed and suggested that because of his devotion to the President and his ideas he was constantly under attack by party men and women who really did not share Osagyefo’s vision.

As soon as they leave, another delegation arrives with a similar story.  Nkrumah was forced to change his decision.  Was this the mark of a dictator?  Would a dictator listen to the views of his followers and change his decision?  There are many similar examples.  When, however, President Nkrumah’s decision was crucial to the realisation of his vision and national purpose, he boldly and even ruthlessly maintained his position.  To me, that was not dictatorship but purposeful leadership.

We should know what happened in the past which reflects and reveals our character.  What happened then happens now and our leaders should develop the appropriate approach.

President Nkrumah at first suspected his close officials of leakages of his intentions.  But he later realised that he discussed matters with trusted collaborators.  He therefore changed the time of major decisions to 11:00 a.m.

Appropriate letters and instruments were signed by 12:30 p.m. when the information officer carried the news to Broadcasting House.  His colleagues and collaborators were taken by surprise.

To promote effective governance, access to the inner gate of the Flagstaff House was strictly restricted.  Except in emergency, no visitor — not even a Minister — entered the “inner sanctorum” of the President’s office in the morning.  Party matters were dealt with in the afternoon according to an agenda.

The President sometimes visited the party Headquarters late afternoon and did try to keep in touch with the rank and file without detriment to his national leadership role.

I believe that any President cannot discharge his duties and proper functions effectively when he sees so many people every day especially during office hours.

It is a 24-hour job for the President. The mornings and early afternoons should be restricted to national and related issues.  The President should be free to work with his close officials in the mornings as Nkrumah did.

Too many people pack the corridors of our President’s office and those of other leaders.  It is often said that the President needs advice.

For some time now, our Presidents have been suffocated by advice.  What our Presidents, however, need is a concrete blueprint to realise specific aspects of their visions or aims without which the nation will float aimlessly on corridors darkened by hordes of people who want to see the President.

Who is K.B. Asante?

Asante 3

K. B. Asante is a Ghanaian retired diplomat, writer and statesman. He was the Secretary to Ghana‘s First President Dr. Kwame Nkrumah. Asante served under most Heads of States in Ghana, starting from Nkrumah, and also served as the Principal Secretary at African Affairs Secretariat from 1960 to 1966.

He was educated at Achimota School and later returned there to teach Mathematics (1945-48), before proceeding to Durham University in Britain, where he obtained a BSc Mathematics in 1952. He also became a member of the Institute of Statisticians in 1953, before returning to Achimota College, where he taught mathematics (1953-55).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Voice-From-Afar-Ghanaian-Experience/dp/9988809735

– See more at: http://www.graphic.com.gh/features/voice-from-afar/32415-voice-from-afar-was-nkrumah-a-dictator.html#sthash.5cewWIt3.dpuf

Quotes Of Some Of Africa’s Great Writers

Africa is a continent of rich culture, tradition, heritage and customs, producing great writers from different backgrounds. Some of the writers’ books have played significant role in Africa’s education for ages. Below are quotes of some of Africa’s great writers.

Chinua Achebe

Achebe

“When suffering knocks at your door and you say there is no seat for him, he tells you not to worry because he has brought his own stool.” – Chinua Achebe.

Wole Soyinka

Wole

“My horizon on humanity is enlarged by reading the writers of poems, seeing a painting, listening to some music, some opera, which has nothing at all to do with a volatile human condition or struggle or whatever. It enriches me as a human being.” – Wole Soyinka.

Nawal El Saadawi

Nawal

“Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”
Nawal El Saadawi.

Nadine Gordimer

Nadine

“Writing is making sense of life. You work your whole life and perhaps you’ve made sense of one small area.”- Nadine Gordimer.
Nelson Mandela

Dela

“Education is the most powerful weapon which can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela.

Kwame Nkrumah

Nkru 1

“The forces that unite us are intrinsic and greater than the superimposed influences that keep us apart.” ― Kwame Nkrumah

http://www.amazon.com/Opening-Spaces-Anthology-Contemporary-African/dp/0435910108/

 

 

 

The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born

A railway freight clerk in Ghana attempts to hold out against the pressures that impel him toward corruption in both his family and his country. The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born is the novel that catapulted Ayi Kwei Armah into the limelight. The novel is generally a satirical attack on the Ghanaian society during Kwame Nkrumah’s regime and the period immediately after independence in the 1960s. It is often claimed to rank with “Things Fall Apart” as one of the high points of post-olonial African Literature.

Beauty 2

Excerpt from Chapter 6: 

“And where is my solid ground these days? Let us say just that the cycle from birth to decay has been short. Short, brief. But otherwise not at all unusual. And even in the decline into the end there are things that remind the longing mind of old beginnings and hold out the promise of new ones, things even like your despair itself. I have heard this pain before, only then it was multiplied many, many times, but that may only be because at that time I was not so alone, so far apart. Maybe there are other lonely voices despairing now.

I will not be entranced by the voice, even if it should swell as it did in the days of hope. I will not be entranced, since I have seen the destruction of the promises it made. But I shall not resist it either. I will be like a cork. It is so surprising, is it not, how even the worst happenings of the past acquire a sweetness in the memory. Old harsh distresses are now merely pictures and tastes which hurt no more, like itching scars which can only give pleasure now.

Strange, because when I can think soberly about it all, with out pushing any later joys into the deepr past, I can remember that things were terrible then. When the war was over the soldiers came back to homes broken in their absence and they themselves brought murder in their hearts and gave it to those nearest them.

I saw it, not very clearly, because I had no way of understanding it, but it frightened me. We had gone on marches of victory and I do not think there was anyone mean enough in spirit to ask whether we knew what we were celebrating. Whose victory? Ours? It did not matter. We marched, and only a dishonest fool will look back on his boyhood and say he knew even then that there was no meaning in any of it.

It is so funny now, to remember that we all thought we were welcoming victory. Or perhaps there is nothing funny here at all, and it is only that victory itself happens to be the identical twin of defeat.

The Author

 AYI

Ayi Kwei Armah,  (born 1939, Takoradi, Gold Coast [now Ghana]), Ghanaian novelist whose work deals with corruption and materialism in contemporary Africa.

Armah was educated in local mission schools and at Achimota College before going to the United States in 1959 to complete his secondary education at GrotonSchool and his bachelor’s degree at Harvard University. He thereafter worked as a scriptwriter, translator, and English teacher in Paris, Tanzania, Lesotho, Senegal, and the United States, among other places.
          In his first novel, The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born (1968), Armah showed his deep concern for greed and political corruption in a newly independent African nation. In his second novel, Fragments (1970), a young Ghanaian returns home after living in the United States and is disillusioned by the Western-inspired materialism and moral decay that he sees around him.
           The theme of return and disillusionment continued in Why Are We So Blest? (1971), but with a somewhat wider scope. In Two Thousand Seasons (1973) Armah borrowed language from the African dirge and praise song to produce a chronicle of the African past, which is portrayed as having a certain romantic perfection before being destroyed by Arab and European despoilers.         
          All of Armah’s works were concerned with the widening moral and spiritual chasm that existed between appearance and reality, spirit and substance, and past and present in his native Ghana.

http://www.amazon.com/Ayi-Kwei-Armah/e/B001HPIEC8

Kwame Nkrumah: The Father Of African Nationalism

“Our independence is meaningless unless it is linked up with the total liberation of Africa.”- Dr Kwame Nkrumah .

The first African statesman to achieve world recognition was Kwame Nkrumah (1909-1972), who became president of the new Republic of Ghana in 1960. He campaigned ceaselessly for African solidarity and for the liberation of southern Africa from white settler rule. His greatest achievement was to win the right of black peoples in Africa to have a vote and to determine their own destiny.

Kwame 5

He turned a dream of liberation into a political reality. He was the leader of Ghana who urged Africa to shed the colonial yoke and who inspired black people everywhere to seek their freedom.

This revised edition of Birmingham’s fine and accessible biography chronicles the public accomplishments of this extraordinary leader, who faced some of the century’s most challenging political struggles over colonial transition. African nationalism, and pan-Africanism. It also relates some of the personal trials of a complex individual.

As a student in America in the late 1930s, Nkrumah, shy, disorganized, but ambitious and persistent, earned four degrees in ten years. For political training he then went to England. Nkrumah found writing difficult throughout his lifetime, but once back in his African homeland, with its oral heritage, Nkrumah blossomed as a charming conversationalist, a speechmaker, and eventually a visionary and inspiring leader.

Nkrumah’s crusades were controversial, however, and in the 1960s he gradually lost his heroic stature both among his own people and among his fellow leaders. He lived his last years in exile.

This remarkable life story, which touches on many of the issues facing modern Africa, will open a window of understanding for the general leader as well as for graduate and undergraduate classes.

In this new edition, Birmingham also examines Nkrumah’s exile and provides insight into the image of Nkrumah that has emerged in the light of research recently published.

The Author

David

David Birmingham lived in Switzerland from 1947 to 1954 as a child and returned there in the 1990s as a visiting historian. From 1980 to 2001 he held the chair of Modern History in the University of Kent at Canterbury in England. He is the author of many books, including Portugal and Africa.

http://www.amazon.com/David-Birmingham/e/B001ITXLX0/

The Significance Of Kente Cloth In Ghana

Kente cloth in Ghana

Ex-Ghanaian leader Jerry John Rawlings, ex-president Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton in Kente outfits.

Certain products lift the image of a country, as the sole manufacturer of that great product. Historically, traditionally and culturally, Kente products and wears have brought recognition to Ghana, through the history of the Ashanti history. Can we say then that Kente cloth originates from the Ashanti?

 

The tradition of Kente cloth is said to have been developed in the 17th century and stems from ancient Akan weaving techniques, dating as far back as the 11th century AD. The beautifully woven cloth even though is associated with the culture of the Ivory Coast; history reveals originated from Ghana.

Ghana’s fame as the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to gain independence reflects on its traditional Kente cloth, worn on every occasion, including ceremonies, festivals, and royal events. Kente designs aren’t just fashion but have stories with proverbial meaning, giving each cloth its own distinction.

 

ali 11

Boxer Muhammad Ali and former Ghanaian leader, late Kwame Nkrumah. The boxer put on Kente cloth on his arrival in Ghana.

Kente remains a symbol of national pride, not only for Ghanaians but also for Africans in the Diaspora.  For example, African Americans highlight their connection to the African continent, proudly presenting Kente in celebrations of African American heritage, such as Black History Month.

Many Africa-Americans wear it to show their awareness or support of “Black Pride.” Thus, the United States and other parts of the world are today central to the African art market and the livelihood of artists in Ghana.

You can’t visit Ghana exploring the rich traditional culture of the country by not wearing a Kente cloth. Even at overseas conferences, Ghanaians in Kente cloth always steal the show.

Ali 4

“I am happy to have my first Kente Cloth,” says the baby.

Do African Leaders, African-Americans And Africans In The Diaspora Know The Difference Between Adolf Hitler And King Leopold II Of Belgium?

“Merely by describing yourself as black you have started on a road towards emancipation, you have committed yourself to fight against all forces that seek to use your blackness as a stamp that marks you out as a subservient being.” Steve Biko.

By Joel Savage and Johan van Dongen

Somewhere in Nebraska, a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States, there was a resident who decided to decorate his property with a hateful message boldly written “Thanks Africa for Aids, Ebola, and Obama.”

This Nebraska resident obviously lacks the knowledge over the history of the true origin of Aids, Ebola and the problems that the continent Africa has to deal with. He should have read about the German scientist Luhrs, who infected himself with Aids in the 1920’s of the last century.  He should have also read about the statements of Lignee, Robert Gallo and Luc Montagnier, the so-called pseudo discoverers of the human immunodeficiency virus HIV.

Leopold II, Idi Amin of Belgium

Leopold II’s statue: There is no government on earth in their right mind will build the statue of a murderer. He killed 10 million Africans, including women and children

The absence of brain doesn’t count for well educated African leaders and African intellectuals, at least we hope not. If all African leaders, including Africans and African-American intellectuals and Africans in the Diaspora, want to be respected then they should take notice of the numerous statues of King Leopold II, in Belgium and the absence of statues of Hitler.

Who are to continue the works of Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr, Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah etc; after all their struggles to bring the Black man to this destination? Are African leaders lazy and ignorant? Are African-Americans and Africans in the Diaspora still sleeping all these years after the assassination of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr?

Leopold II the butcher

Congolese demonstrators in Brussels over the murderer and rapist King Leopold’s statue.

If they are still sleeping I’m going to wake them up and ask them: If they know the difference between Adolf Hitler and King Leopold II of Belgium. Why for so long they have failed to ask Belgium, the reason there is no Adolf Hitler’s statue in any part of this word, because he killed six million Jews, but there are so many statues and streets named after a king that tortured, maimed and killed over ten million Africans, including children throughout Belgium?

If they try to know the reason, definitely that will bring their minds home to know the difference between the development  and the manufacture of the  Aids viruses in German Aids factories, as described by Luhrs between 1917 and 1925.

The same Aids virus was also noticed and described by the French veterinary surgeon Lignee, way back in 1843. This means that the so-called discoverers and Nobel-Prize winners Robert Gallo and Luc Montagnier, committed plagiarism and fraud in the eighties of last century, isn’t it? In fact, Montagnier stated fiercely in one of his publications that the horse Aids virus of the nineteen twenties is identical to the human Aids virus. If such statement was made long before the outbreak of Aids and Ebola today, why are people ignorant to dispute the fact that Aids and Ebola viruses were long created in a laboratory before criminally used against Africans?

African leaders, African-Americans, and Africans in the Diaspora are you there?

This is what makes the book: “Aids and Ebola the greatest crime in medical history against mankind” a masterpiece among all health books about Aids and Ebola, because every book on the shelves over these two subjects is false. People should begin to use their money wisely and ask themselves, why such a great book can’t get any maximum support or publicity, because the media, the governments, pharmaceutical companies and World Health Organization are all involved.

However, the more those criminals try to deceive the public, the more we shall post articles to inform readers about the truth. People shouldn’t  think because it happened to Africans, there is no reason to care. Yesterday was Aids, today is Ebola, who knows what comes tomorrow? We Africans have passed the exams of pains, trials, and tribulations; the question is how would America and Europe cope up when the diseases the West and America planted in Africa begin to spread to their own country? This is the reason we are encouraging everyone to fight those criminals.

Is mustn’t be difficult for African leaders, African intellectuals, African-Americans and Africans in the Diaspora to understand that Africa natives are made susceptible for Aids and Ebola and Obama has nothing to do with it. The Rockefeller foundation, Germany, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Russia, the United States of America, Japan, and the World Health Organization are responsible.

As long as foreign Western countries, including Russia and Japan, as well as the media, dominate the news about the real origin of Aids and Ebola, things will never change and certainly never will change when making certain African leaders, companies and people with influence dependent of their money and their military equipment, because then it would be difficult to expose the truth.

After our messages to all African leaders about revealing the truth of the origin of Aids and Ebola, they’ve got the key to exposed themselves as real leaders of their respective countries. Therefore, it is a pity that many African leaders are unbelievably irresponsible and interested only in corruption than the welfare of their citizens. Certain African leaders have to stop immediately their criminal attitude and start to improve the living standards of the people, by strengthening its health care and democratic as well as political institutions.

 

Abuse of Congolese children by Belgium

Alice Seeley Harris with a large group of Congolese children. Alice Seeley Harris and her husband John Harris were missionaries in the Belgian Congo at the turn of the century. They produced a collection of images documenting the horrific abuses of the indigenous people of the Congo by the Belgian King Leopold II’s regime. Their photographs formed part of what was probably the first orchestrated multimedia campaign against widespread human rights abuses.

Imagine calling the media around Africa, including Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Uganda, Ghana, Kenya etc; to speak about the crimes of Aids and Ebola, yet after sending the article, none of the media I spoke to published the news. Only NewsTimeAfrica published the article. How do we expect the Whiteman to stop his criminal activities against Africa when we behave in this way? Until Africans wake up from its slumber, the continent will always remain a mockery to the Whitman.

The fact that African leaders are lazy, corrupt and always depending on the West and America for miracles, they are too stupid and scared to speak against crimes the West and America committed against Africa. African leaders should work together in order to cope with their dependence and dominance of Western countries, Russia and Japan who committed war crimes against African people.

Therefore every natural person and every African government are hereby called upon to join our indictment with the goal to once and for all terminate all crimes committed by the above-mentioned countries. They should act like Chinese companies that are now transferring their operations to Africa, creating jobs there for both Chinese and Africans and transferring new technologies and know-how at the same time. That is what we call achieving co-prosperity.

Two books recommended to readers:  Little Boygium-Wonderful Experience and Aids and Ebola, The Greatest Crimes In Medical History Against Mankind.

https://www.amazon.com/Little-Boygium-Experience-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013SJ7DCW/

https://www.amazon.com/Greatest-Medical-History-Against-Mankind-ebook/dp/B016W89W1G