10 Great Reggae Love Tunes To Boost Your Love Life

Music

International Reggae star Gregory Isaacs

There are many ways to boost your love life to build a happy solid foundation. Some go to the restaurant, cinema, opera and other places of interests, but many used to forget that playing love songs at home is one of the best strategies to build a happy union. Below are some of my favourite reggae love tunes. I hope you will like them.

  1. Bob Marley’s Turn Your Lights Down Low

2. Peter Tosh’s Rock With Me

3. Shaggy’s Piece Of My Heart

4. Anthony B’s Someone Loves You Honey

5. Mikey Spice’ The Power Of Love

6. Beres Hammond’s They Gonna Talk

7. Gregory Isaacs’ My Only Lover

8. Lucky Dube’s How Will I Know If She Loves Me

9. I Jah Man Levi’s I do

10. Roger Robin’s You’re Beautiful

This is my selection of reggae love tunes for you. Remember that the tongue and the teeth sometimes fight. That means there are misunderstandings in every marriage or relationship. When there is any problem rekindle your love by playing these great love tunes. It will help you.

BONUS

Jimmy’s Cliff’s Shelter Of Love

Tarrus Riley’s She’s Royal

Freddy McGregor’s I don’t Want To Be Lonely

The CD’s of all these great artists are available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/

The Secret Of How We Used Reggae Music As A Survival Tool In Africa

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A major figure in world music, Jimmy Cliff has painstakingly crossed many rivers to become an international superstar.

Life is very tough and full of lessons. In Africa, during our school days and darkest periods, to avoid social problems we fought to stay focused. On Sundays, we listen to whatever the preacher tells us, but away from the pastors sight, we used the reggae music as a tool to direct us on the right track and expressed our emotions.

In the sixties and seventies in Ghana, we listened to the songs of reggae pioneers, such as John Holt, Desmond Decker etc, but the musician whose songs played a significant role in our lives is Jimmy Cliff. His music was encouraging and inspiring.  It educated and made us tough in our environment with the desire to succeed in life. Below are some of the selected tunes of Jimmy Cliff we dwelled on.

Hard Road To Travel

We listened to reggae from dusk till dawn and the lyric encouragement helps us let go of suppressed feelings.

“It’s a hard road to travel and a rough, rough way to go, but I can’t turn back, my heart is fixed, my mind’s made up, I’ll never stop, my faith will see, see me through,” sings Jimmy Cliff. The hope and faith we had from such songs became our tool for survival.

Struggling Man

Everyman has a right to live, Love is all that we have to give, Together we struggle by your will to survive, Then together we fight just to stay alive, Struggling man has got to move
Struggling man, no time to lose, I’m a struggling man And I’ve got to move on.

Born To Win

I am born to win, Been lost and found, turned upside down, yeah, yeah, yeah.
Been cast aside and been despised, uhm, uhm, uhm, But I’m Daniel in the lion’s den, and Jonah in the belly of the whale, I’m not alone so I cannot fail, no, no, no. And I’m born to win.

Sitting In Limbo

Sitting here in Limbo, Waiting for the tide turn, Yeah, now, sitting here in Limbo, So many things I’ve got to learn, Meanwhile, they’re putting up a resistance,  But I know that my faith will lead me on.

You Can Get It If You Really Want

You can get it if you really want, You can get it if you really want, You can get it if you really want, But you must try, try and try, try and try ,You’ll succeed at last.

While we listen to such encouraging lyrics we are inspired in such a way that we don’t feel the pain we go through in our daily hustle, often eliminating the boredomness and depression. Even though Reggae music is not much promoted commercially by MTV, the power of the music can’t be denied.

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Jimmy Cliff and Peter Tosh were both against Apartheid in South Africa. In the picture, Jimmy Cliff wears T-Shirt with the picture of murdered South African hero, Steve Biko

Synthetic World

Your world is plastic; Can see through to the other side, Your cities are made of wood, Antiques are what you’ve got inside, Houses are paper but folks don’t hear a word you say
Friendship’s like acid, It burns, burns, burns as it slides away.

House of Exile

There’s a day of feasting and a day of famine, Day of sadness and a day of joy, You could see in the day of feasting, Life isn’t just a little play-like toy., So the day arrived when you least expected, Cos you always thought you were well protected, Now you feel like a fish out of water, So now you’re wondering what’s the matter.

“You can change the style, Of playing reggae, You can change the Rhythm of playing reggae, But never ever, Change the message,” sings Lucky Dube in Reggae Strong, because it’s a music that carries the message of truth and the light. If you don’t like the truth, you can never be a friend of reggae.

The Amazon page of Jimmy Cliff: http://www.amazon.com/Jimmy-Cliff/e/B000AR8LMC

30 Minutes With Andrew Tosh : Son Of The Great Peter Tosh


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Andrew Tosh on stage. Photo credit- Joel Savage
                                 There is magic in music, it heals, consoles, inspires, and even has the voice to speak to us if you listen carefully. On the road of agony, growing in dangerous and hard environments, reggae music was the only tool many Africans lived on to pass through the turmoils of life successfully.
                                   Music like ‘Stand Firm’ by Peter Tosh, ‘Born To Win’ by Jimmy Cliff, ‘Give Thanks and Praises’ by Bob Marley, ‘Black Heart Man’ by Bunny Wailer’ etc, are some of the songs we depended on to prevent us getting into trouble with the determination to succeed in life.
                                  There were many great musicians that started early in Jamaica. Desmond Decker, John Holt, Toots and the Maytals, Culture, Burning Spear, etc, but I can’t explain how Peter Tosh, Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff and Bunny Wailer did it as if they were the only musicians in Jamaica that time.

                                  Once you like the father, you will like the son, the reason I was very glad when I met both Andrew Tosh and Julian Marley in Antwerp.  It all started during the summer holiday festivals in Antwerp, Belgium. I have missed many festivals and interviews because the festivals take place while on holidays in Africa. This time, luck was on my side, among other artists to perform was Andrew Tosh.

                                    I have heard many times, people saying that Jamaican musicians are  snobbish and have no interest in Africans, but that’s not true. I have enjoyed every minute of meeting famous Jamaican musicians. They are respectable, friendly and story-tellers.
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One of Andrew Tosh’s fans takes a photograph with him. Photo credit: Joel Savage
                         Andrew told me much about how he was influenced by his father. His father thought him how to play the piano while very young. Like every child, Andrew enjoyed his father, but quite sad over the pain and brutalities his father went through at the hands of the so-called law, while they ignored the crimes tearing the society apart.
                         “If you’re great, all eyes are on you. You’ll have both lovers and enemies. The goal of the enemies is to break you down physically and spiritually but Peter wasn’t an easy person to submit to that breakdown. He was one of the living great musicians in his time. The reason as a tribute I wrote ‘He Never Died.’
                          Yes! Andrew played ‘He Never Died’ for his father. For the rest of the conversation, I had with Andrew Tosh and other artists such as Luciano, you can read it in the book ‘The Passion Of Reggae and African music available at Amazon.

Sitting Here In Limbo: Got Some Time To Search My Soul- Jimmy Cliff

Jimmy-Cliff 2Jimmy Cliff, crossing many rivers to UN Peace Ambassador

Reggae music is inspirational. It is a music that carries Jah’s prophetical message, the truth and the light. It’s a music that gives comfort and satisfaction to sufferers, the down trodden victims and gives hope to the common people denied justice and abused in the society.

I love reggae music, because it gives me inspiration to write without ceasing. Just as I love the music, the same way I love the artists and the players of the instruments behind the music. Jimmy Cliff is one of my favourite reggae artists. I love almost all his songs but not more than this great song called ‘Sitting Here In Limbo.’

Sitting here in limbo

But I know it won’t be long

Sitting here in limbo

Like a bird without a song

Well, they’re putting up a resistance

But I know that my faith will lead me on

 

Sitting here in limbo

Waiting for the dice to roll

Yeah, now, sitting here in limbo

Got some time to search my soul

Well, they’re putting up a resistance

But I know that my faith will lead me on

 

I don’t know where life will leave me

But I know where I have been

I can’t say what life will show me

But I know what I have seen

Tried my hand at love and friendship

But all that is past and gone

This little boy is movin’ on

 

Sitting here in limbo

Waiting for the tide to flow

Sitting here in limbo

Knowing that I have to go

Well, they’re putting up a resistance

But I know that my faith will lead me on

 

I don’t know where life will take me

But I know where I have been

I don’t know what life will show me

But I know what I have seen

Tried my hand at love and friendship

That is past and gone

And now it’s time to move along

 

Gonna lead me on now

Meanwhile, they’re putting up resistance

But I know that my faith will lead me on

Sitting in limbo, limbo, limbo

Sitting in limbo, limbo, limbo

Sitting in limbo, limbo, limbo

Meanwhile, they’re putting up a resistance

But I know that my faith will lead me on

Listen Jimmy Cliff singing Siting Here In Limbo

Amazon.com page of Jimmy Cliff: http://goo.gl/zG5tLi

Jimmy Cliff’s Inspirational ‘Dear Mother’ Lyrics

Cliff 2Jimmy Cliff’s classic album: Follow My Mind.

Apart from Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer, Toots & The Maytals, John Holt, Desmond Decker etc, and other early Jamaican musicians that provided a solid foundation for the reggae music, Jimmy Cliff is one of the  musical legends that rose to international stardom with uncountable hits and numerous albums. 

In this article, it’s not my intention to write about Jimmy Cliff’s biography or achievements in the field of music, since there are hundreds of articles about this great musician and perfect gentleman appointed ‘Peace Ambassador’ by the United Nations, but to share some of his inspiring lyrics.

In 1976, Jimmy Cliff came out with one of his masterpiece albums entitled ‘Follow My Mind.’ On this album were “I’m Gonna Live, I’m Gonna Love, Dear Mother, Remake The World, Wahjahka Man, Going Mad, You’re The Only One, If I follow My Mind, Look At The Mountains, No Woman No Cry, Who Feels It Knows It and Hypocrites.”

One of my favorite songs on this album which sold worldwide is “Dear Mother.” From generation to generation, the lyrics of this great song continue to inspire me, to love my mother more and more, since she still lives, after losing my father when he was just 43. Below  is the lyric of Jimmy Cliff’s ‘Dear Mother.’ Enjoy Jimmy Cliff’s great tunes and golden voice in his film The Harder They Come.’

Dear Mother

Do you have a dear mother

Kind, devoted and true
Dear mother I’m sending to you
Best wishes and all the day through
May your days be cloudless and clear
Bringing to you true happiness each day and night of the year

She’s my mother
And I love her so
More than any other
Anywhere I go

Do you have a dear mother
Kind, devoted and true
Dear mother may all that is fair
Come to you right through the year
While I was a child you were my god
You were always dear to me and always were by my side

She’s my mother
And I love her so, yes I do
More than any other
Anywhere I go

Do you have a dear mother
So devoted and true
Dear mother I’m sending to you
Best wishes and all the day through
May your days be cloudless and clear
Bringing to you true happiness each day and night of the year

She’s my mother
And I love her so, yes I do
More than any other
Anywhere I go, talking ’bout my mother

She’s my mother
And I love her so
More than any other, woman in this world
Anywhere I go

She’s my mother

Listen to ‘Dear Mother’ : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6f1WZOZUku4

http://www.amazon.com/Jimmy-Cliff/e/B000AR8LMC

Jamaica Adds Sports To Its Reggae History

Jamaica

Jamaica, that wonderful Island in the Caribbean, for many years has established its name as one of the best countries in the world, in the fields of tourism, and above all the “Home of wonderful reggae music.” Jamaica is the birth place of great reggae stars, including Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Jimmy Cliff, Gregory Isaacs, Joseph Hill-Culture, Desmond Decker, Beres Hammond, Burning Spear, Toots and the Maytals etc.

Apart from the reggae stars, Jamaica has produced great sprinters in the past, such as Merlene Ottey, Asafa Powell etc, yet in athletics, comparing the country to other great sports countries, such as America, Jamaica wasn’t classified as a great country in sports, until the emergence of unknown sprinter, Usain Bolt.

Usain Bolt’s unique and charismatic performance, along with team mate Yohan Blake, have established firmly that Jamaica is not only good in music but also in athletics. The 2012 Olympics games which place in London confirmed it all.

After winning the 100-meter race in 19.32 seconds, Usain became the first athlete to win two Olympic medals in the event. Yohan Blake, his training partner also claimed silver in the event and bronze for Warren Weir. There is no doubt that Jamaicans are now doing better in sports than the United States of America, which has produced great athletes in the past.

It seems underestimation of athletes from ‘Third World Countries’ is gradually coming to an end, because the Jamaican sprinters are “Coming in hot! hot! hot! and firing some shot! shot! shot!” Sings reggae legend late Peter Tosh.

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http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ

Black My Story

Ziggy Marley's 'Black My Story' is very inspirational and emotional

Ziggy Marley has grown from the Melody Makers to be one of Jamaica’s reggae icons

Listening to interviews with most great writers, you will know that many of them were inspired by other writers. When you have passion in something, you dedicate your whole life to it, whether you are making money or not. I love writing since from childhood. It might be hereditary since my late father was also a journalist and writer.

 

Ziggy Marley

Apart from following my father’s footsteps as a writer and journalist, I get my inspiration tirelessly by listening to reggae music. One thing which comes to the mind of many people when reggae music is the subject is ‘Smoking Ganja.’ I have respect and love for Rastafarians, exactly the same way I love the reggae music but I don’t smoke marijuana.

Since the words of most reggae music are soul uplifting, encouraging, inspiring, satisfying and comfort, to those on the road of trials and tribulations, I have a library of reggae collections I play very often. One of them is Ziggy Marley’s ‘Black My Story’. It’s a great song which identifies and reminds the black man where he comes from to love one another. I can’t say the number of times I’ve played this particular song.

Passion Paint 2

There are other great inspirational songs, such as Bob Marley’s ‘Redemption Song,’ Jimmy Cliff’s ‘Sitting In Limbo,’ Peter Tosh’s ‘Pick Me Up,’ and many others. It was through inspiration I had the opportunity to interview many reggae artists, including Julian Marley, Andrew Tosh, Luciano, Anthony B, Capleton, U-Roy, Seun Kuti, Manu Dibango and a host of others, available in the book ‘The Passion of Reggae and African Music.

Black history is very sad. Many feel angry, depressed and sick, when they read what the black man went through or experienced in the hands of the white man, but just as Bob Marley said in his ‘Redemption Song “Some say it’s just part of it ,we got to fulfill the book,” we must forgive instead of being violent. Violence doesn’t pay and as long as we keep past events in our minds, there wouldn’t be any room to think of success or to aim high.

I would like to take the opportunity to wish everyone Happy Xmas Holidays and New Year in advance. One thing I always say is, instead of pointing fingers and accusing each other over the problems of this world, we should put it onto ourselves to restore our nation’s dignity.

http://www.amazon.com/Passion-Reggae-African-Music-ebook/dp/B013L9A1JQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15VyIGgLk9w