Shake The Dust Off Your Feet And Leave

Domestic 1

When Jesus sent forth his disciples to go and preach the gospel, he told them that “Whoever does not receive you, nor heed your words, as you go out of that house or that city, shake the dust off your feet.” This is a very strong advice we need to apply to our lives, especially in this violent world that people make us feel threatened most of the time.

There are things when broken, it can’t be mend. What’s the need to cry over that spilt milk, when you can’t take it back? I find it difficult to understand why many women caught up in an abusive marriage, still try to salvage that marriage.

That worthless man hits his girlfriend or wife every day. He has subjected her to a punching bag; giving her black eye, swollen face, broken nose, yet she still stays, hoping to save the relationship. My dear sister, that beast doesn’t love you, above all, you are too precious to be treated this way.

Real men don’t hit or abuse women. Please, lady; it’s time to shake off the dust of your feet in that abusive house and leave. One misses water when his well runs dry, thus; he will find out how important you are to him, after your departure. Above all, your qualities as a woman, which your abusive man never appreciates, will give you the love and happiness you deserve elsewhere.

I am a man; I know how it hurts when you love a woman who doesn’t love you. ‘The Jolly Brothers,’ the Jamaican reggae group wrote “When you fall in love, with someone, who doesn’t love you. They use you as, a puppet on a string. Look into yourself my friend, try to get wise and be a conscious one, when you fall in love.

Many men think money can buy love. Well, it may probably buy the love they are looking for. But do you know how stupid you are when in her heart she doesn’t love you but only pretending and enjoying your money? Apart from being a puppet on a string, you also become a laughing stock in the community, because the woman is telling all her friends “I am enjoying the fool’s money.”

It may be likely that she is cheating on you with the man she loves. She is enjoying your money with him. Hard working fellow men, please don’t be in such relationship. Shake the dust off your feet and leave. Not every woman wants a rich man. Some look for certain qualities, such as humbleness, humility, submissiveness, caring, loving and truthful. If you have any of such qualities, you will enjoy a happy relationship.

Life is precious, don’t waste it when you are lucky to live on this earth, in a time many people are committing suicide because they feel it’s meaningless to live. You’ve got the power to change your life positively, to let your light shine ahead of you, for everyone to see how great you are. That is if you shake off the dust off your feet in that stormy relationship and leave.

How burdensome To Be A Muslim Woman And A Prisoner Of Islam?

Burka 4

Burka: a symbol of woman abuse, ignorance or prisoner of Islam?

Salia is a Muslim woman and a colleague at work. Unlike many women, she has a different attitude and approach towards her religion. She prays five times daily and does Ramadan every year like every Muslim. But she doesn’t strictly follow Islamic dress codes, such as wearing head covers, signifying principle of modesty.

Salia always tells me how she hates the domination of women by Muslim men. “I respect the Koran, but many Muslims don’t do what the Koran says. Mis-interpretation of the book has caused violence and wickedness among mankind. Every Muslim tries to convince the world that Islam means peace, but they have made the religion the most violent one,” says Salia.

“Not every Muslim is a terrorist, but because of their violent nature, every Muslim is seen as a terrorist,” Aida further stressed. In her early forties, getting married to a Muslim man has been her biggest challenge. “Their violent, abusive and dominant nature puts me off to consider marrying any of them,” said Salia.

This reminds of a similar thing a Moroccan woman married to a Jamaican, told me couple of years ago. “Over my dead body to marry a Muslim man,” she said. Today Amina is happily married to her Christian husband and raising two beautiful twin sisters in Antwerp.

Despite all her fears, Salia’s mother who died just last year assured her to come over to Morocco to see a man she has found for her. Thus; three years ago, she proceeded to Morocco and got married. The man knows that Salia doesn’t cover up her head, yet he married her without any question, because he is coming to Europe.

After their marriage, Salia successfully brought her husband to live in her apartment. Just a month after coming to Belgium, troubles started brewing between her and the husband. Her man is now asking her to cover up her head, but Salia refused on the grounds that he told him she doesn’t use head covers.

This problem escalated to series of arguments and continuous quarrels at home, without any solution. Meanwhile, Salia is pregnant in such a center of misunderstanding and unfriendly atmosphere between her and the man, who knew who she was and now violently wants her to change her lifestyle. What happened next is very disturbing. When Salia was entering her car to work, she met her neighbours she’s been staying with them for over more than four years and she greets them.

Her husband took it as offence, because Salia has greeted Non-Muslims who are Catholics or ‘infidels’ as Muslims call them. Salia thought she has had enough. She threw her husband outside and he left. At the age of forty-four she delivered her first child. The baby is now a year old, doing fine with her single mother.

Burka 6

How comfortable are they in such clothes all in the name of Islam?

What We All Long For

“They were born in the city from people born elsewhere.”

What We All Long For follows the overlapping stories of a close circle of second-generation twenty-somethings living in downtown Toronto. There’s Tuyen, a lesbian avant-garde artist and the daughter of Vietnamese parents who’ve never recovered from losing one of their children in the crush to board a boat out of Vietnam in the 1970s. Tuyen defines herself in opposition to just about everything her family believes in and strives for.

Dione

She’s in love with her best friend Carla, a biracial bicycle courier, who’s still reeling from the loss of her mother to suicide eighteen years earlier and who must now deal with her brother Jamal’s latest acts of delinquency. Oku is a jazz-loving poet who, unbeknownst to his Jamaican-born parents, has dropped out of university.

He is in constant conflict with his narrow-minded and verbally abusive father and tormented by his unrequited love for Jackie, a gorgeous black woman who runs a hip clothing shop on Queen Street West and dates only white men. Like each of her friends, Jackie feels alienated from her parents, former hipsters from Nova Scotia who never made it out of subsidized housing after their lives became entangled with desire and disappointment.

The four characters try to make a life for themselves in the city, supporting one another through their family struggles.

There’s a fifth main character, Quy, the child who Tuyen’s parents lost in Vietnam. In his first-person narrative, Quy describes how he survived in various refugee camps, then in the Thai underworld. After years of being hardened, he has finally made his way to Toronto and will soon be reunited with his family – whether to love them or hurt them, it’s not clear. His story builds to a breathless crescendo in an ending that will both shock and satisfy readers.

What We All Long For is a gripping and, at times, heart-rending story about identity, longing and loss in a cosmopolitan city. No other writer has presented such a powerful and richly textured portrait of present-day Toronto. Rinaldo Walcott writes in The Globe and Mail: “… every great city has its literary moments, and contemporary Toronto has been longing for one. We can now say with certainty that we no longer have to long for a novel that speaks this city’s uniqueness: Dionne Brand has given us exactly that.” Donna Bailey Nurse writes in the National Post: “What We All Long For is a watershed novel. From now on, Canadian writers will be pressed to portray contemporary Toronto in all its multiracial colour and polyphonic sound.”

But What We All Long For is not only about a particular city. It’s about the universal experience of being human. As Walcott puts it, “Brand makes us see ourselves differently and anew. She translates our desires and experiences into a language, an art that allows us to voice that which we live, but could not utter or bring to voice until she did so for us.”

The Author

Dione 2

Dionne Brand is a renowned poet, novelist, and essayist. Her writing is notable for the beauty of its language, and for its intense engagement with issues of social justice, including particularly issues of gender and race. She was educated at the University of Toronto, where she earned a BA in English and Philosophy and an MA in the Philosophy of Education.

Dionne Brand became prominent first as an award-winning poet, winning the Governor General’s Literary Award for her volume Land to Light On, and nominated for the volumes No Language Is Neutral and Inventory respectively. She has won the Pat Lowther Award for poetry and her volume thirsty was nominated for the Griffin Poetry Prize. But she has also achieved great distinction and acclaim in fiction, non-fiction, and film.

Her fiction includes the novel In Another Place, Not Here, a New York Times notable book in 1998, and At the Full and Change of the Moon, a Los Angeles Times Notable Book of the Year in 1999. (The Village Voice also included Dionne Brand in its 1999 “Writers on the Verge” literary supplement.) Her latest critically acclaimed and Toronto Book Award winning novel, What We All Long For, is the story of four young people in Toronto; like thirsty, a recent book of poems, the novel offers an indelible portrait of this great multicultural city. Her non-fiction includes Bread Out Of Stone, and A Map to the Door of No Return, which is a meditation on Blackness in the diaspora.

Dionne Brand has published eighteen books, contributed to seventeen anthologies, written dozens of essays and articles, and made four documentary films for the National Film Board. She was recently a Distinguished Visiting Professor at St. Lawrence University in New York and has taught literature and creative writing at universities in both British Columbia and Ontario. She has also held the Ruth Wynn Woodward Chair in Women’s Studies at Simon Fraser University. She lives in Toronto and presently holds a University Research Chair at the University of Guelph where she is a professor.

http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_book_1?ie=UTF8&field-author=Dionne+Brand&search-alias=books-ca