Life As Immigrant At The Notorious Pantanella In Via Casilina Rome

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma Novembre 1990 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan, Bangladesh, Africani tra cui (Joel Savage) Panoramica della Pantanella. Rome

As a child growing up in a strongly religious family, I was thought that everything which is opposite to the teachings of the Holy Bible, including laziness is a sin. I tried my best to live a clean life. We were thought to believe that Israel, Jerusalem, and other Biblical countries were all in heaven, without a slight knowledge those countries were on the same earth we are living today.

When I left my family looking for a job, I tried to be sincere and prevented doing anything wrong which could land me in jail. I read that jail changes people’s attitude to be good or worse. But I wasn’t interested to know the positive or negative influences of jail on people. My only interest is never to be there because it’s not the right place for me.

In the year 1990, from Lagos, Nigeria, I made a transit in Rome, on my way to German. In Rome, I was detained at the Fiumicino airport. The Italian immigration regularly does that to many foreigners, especially Africans. Like a tourist, I walked around the airport lounge without a room to sleep and food for three days. On the third, I was really starving, so I approached one of the immigration officials and said to him that I am hungry. He looked at my face and asked me “Am I your father?” Then he walked away.

Without knowing what the officials have in store for me, I handed over an application for asylum as a journalist and it worked, because I have some few publications over my profession on me. On the fourth day, from nowhere came one of the immigration officers, he said to me: “Your application has been accepted, today the police will come to take you to Rome.” I was shocked beyond expression.

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.

 The good Samaritan didn’t only deliver the unexpected message, but he pulled out from his pocket a number of notes and said to me: “I don’t want my colleagues to see me giving you money, buy some food to eat at the airport.” I didn’t take the money. I told him: “This important information you have given to me has taken all the hunger away, thank you.” He walked away with his money.

On the fourth day, the police came, just as the officer told me and took me in a police car to the city, Rome, and left me there to fight for my survival. Without anywhere to sleep, I passed all my nights at the Central Train Station. Among other Africans, we watched a big television screen during the day to forget our misery, then in the night, I go to sleep at my hiding place. The police and the workers at the train station never discovered the place I slept.

After some time, I discovered places where I could eat every day without paying for food. I could take my bath and take some clothes. One of such places was at ‘Via Dandolo.’ Daniela, the head of the Caritas (Charity) at Via Dandolo, was a very good woman, but one of her female workers was a very bad woman. A thief. Since we had no address, our letters passed through the Caritas at Via Dandola and this woman took the opportunity to steal money from our letters.

I caught her twice, so I wasn’t surprised when I lost the 10 pounds a friend sent me from England, but I didn’t tell Daniela about it. Through the Caritas, I had my initial lessons and attended classes to learn the Italian. I was one of the best immigrants who could write and speak the language fluently, yet my life was miserable because I was still sleeping at the train station.

In Rome, I was robbed, admitted and operated at a hospital, but the nurse refused to touch me, because of my color, thus; every morning when on duty, she calls someone to attend to me, but she had time for every Italian patient at the hospital. I was once sitting in the hospital’s garden after the operation, when an Italian old man, one of the patients came close to me, looked at my face and said to me: “Marocchino motaccizoa.” – an insult, after mistakenly taken me as a Moroccan. I didn’t say a word.

Then all of a sudden, as if it was announced on the radio, all the immigrants in Rome, without accommodation, discovered an abandoned Pasta factory called ‘Pantanella.’ Pantanella is notoriously known for all criminal activities, including drug peddling and crime, similar to drug cartel zones of Mexico. One needs strength, courage, heart and braveness to survive at that place. Italians think they are brave, but many of them dare to pass Via Casilina, the street Pantanella is located in the night.

That was the place I lived and worked as a toilet cleaner for thousands of immigrants, using six containers as toilets, to raise money to feed. I was employed by the Muslim head at the place. It’s terrible and frightening to live at Pantenella. It wasn’t a prison, but the place, I think was tough like Alcatraz, because of the criminal activities many illegal immigrants engaged in feeding.

 

Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh.Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Roma 31 gennaio 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupato da centinaia di immigrati asiatici provenienti dal Pakistan e Bangladesh. Le forze dell’Ordine sgombrano la Pantanella. Scoppia un incendio durante lo sgombero Rome, January 31, 1991 Ex Pastificio Pantanella occupied by hundreds of Asian immigrants from Pakistan and Bangladesh. The Police evacuate the Pantanella.A fire during the evacuation

The abandoned factory accommodated both soft and hardened criminals from various countries, including Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Africa etc. I lived in Pantanella for four months, and the Italian government tired of the crimes going on in that abandoned Pasta factory ejected all the foreigners.

But the Italian government did something great for the African immigrants. Something we weren’t expecting. The government paid for two weeks stay in a hotel for all the Africans, with the ultimatum that before the two weeks expired, we should find a place on our own to live.

Through a very good sympathetic woman called Nana, (she died in Rome a few years ago) I got a job as a houseboy to serve one journalist called Claudio Lavazza, working at television station TG2, belonging to the former Italian Prime Minister, Sylvio Berlusconi. He provided me accommodation and paid me well. Besides, he gave me the new version of Fiat Cinque Cento (500) to drive. It may be likely that I was the first black man in the entire Italy to drive the new Fiat Cinque Cento when it freshly came out. I met other journalist friends of Claudio, including Michele Cucuzza.

After three years, I said goodbye to Rome and returned to Africa. I married and returned to Europe once again but this time choosing Amsterdam. ‘Overseas Chronicle: The Rome and Amsterdam Experience’ is a book once started you’ll find it hard to put away, because of the shocking intriguing stories in the book. Find out more of what happened to me in Rome and later in Holland, which led me to detention in Amsterdam.

 

Come sono sopravvissuto come un immigrato nella Pantanella pericoloso può essere letto in: 
Chronicle 3

Jesus Christ The Superstar: Questions To Ask If I Meet Him

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One of the greatest Biblical men ever to step on this planet 2000 years ago was Jesus Christ. From the town of Nazareth in what is now called Israel, Jesus traveled about the region and gained a large followers.

His powers and claims to be the son of God didn’t only give him love, but hatred from an empire of deceitful enemies. After a few years, the religious leaders in Jerusalem falsely accused him of crimes and handed him over to the Roman authorities and he was executed.

His execution didn’t bring to the end of his doctrine. A short time later, his followers preached in the name of Jesus Christ, whom they said rose from the dead. More and more followers were added to this movement which has become the Christian church of today.

Jesus healed the sick, lame, the blind and cast away demons tormenting mankind. He thought about how to love, to give and to forgive, but like many of his followers, I don’t understand some of his teachings.

Jesus said “Bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you. Whoever hits you on the cheek, offer him the other also; and whoever takes away your coat, do not withhold your shirt from him either.” Luke 6: 28-29.

I understand Jesus wants peace and love among people. It’s, therefore, necessary to pray for our enemies and those that mistreat us. But how can the great teacher tell us to do these things when people continue to abuse and mistreat other people, taking their humbleness and submissiveness as weaknesses to dominate mankind?

Above all, the great teacher said: “Whoever hits you on the cheek, offer him the other also.” What about if I collapse and never regain consciousness after giving him the other cheek? I love Jesus with all my heart. He knows it, but I am not going to give the other cheek to anyone who slaps me. I need to slap back in return before he kills me.

Christians all over the world believe in the second coming of Christ. Nobody knows when he is coming. He said, “For you, yourselves know full well that the day of the Lord will come just like a thief in the night.” Whether dead or alive when he comes, I believe I will meet him to explain these teachings I find them hard to follow or obey.

Love Conquers Everything If We Give Peace A Chance

Man 3Muslims praying in a Jewish Synagogue

After Mosque Arson, This Synagogue Opened Its Doors to Muslims in Need of a Place to Pray

by Rafi Schwartz : Original article published in ‘Good- A magazine for the Global Citizen

Sometimes it seems as if the world is full of nothing but sectarian violence and interfaith animosity. In Peterborough, Ontario, however, an act of hate intended to tear a city apart has instead brought it closer together.

The Masjid al-Salaam mosque serves a Muslim community of around 1,000. On November 14, that community suddenly found itself without a place to worship after a fire—believed to be deliberately set in what police are investigating as a “hate crime”—destroyed Peterborough’s only Muslim prayer space, causing a reported $80,000 in damages. It’s an attack that shocked the city, and drew immediate condemnation from Mayor Darryl Bennett, who called the arson “totally out of character” for his community, echoing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who said he was “deeply disturbed,” reports CBC.ca.

In response to the attack, Peterborough’s Jewish community has stepped up and offered their prayer space to the temporarily displaced mosque members as place where they can worship. Larry Gillman, president of the city’s Beth Israel Synagogue, told The Canadian Jewish News: “I immediately sent an email to our board with the idea of sharing our space with the Muslim community, realizing that they were not going to have a place to pray in the meantime.”

Since extending their invitation, Beth Israel has hosted a number of prayer sessions for the mosque’s members, as well as an interfaith potluck dinner. Children from the synagogue greeted their guests with a large, handmade banner reading “Welcome Friends,” hung across the wall of the makeshift prayer space.

Canadian media outlet CityNews reported from the scene:

To that end, the synagogue also shares its space with the local Unitarian Fellowship.

Speaking with CBC.ca, Masjid al-Salaam president Kenzu Abdella described a sense of trepidation after receiving the synagogue’s offer, but “within 24 hours, that changed. [Synagogue representatives] walked to the mosque and told us that whatever we need, they will support us.”

Even though it came out of a tragedy,” he added, “we are working together.”

In addition to the temporary prayer space, a crowdfunding effort raised over $110,000 to cover the cost of the mosque’s reconstruction.

We’re so grateful to everyone,” Abdella told The Canadian Jewish News. “It’s not just the financial aspect that really makes us very proud to be Canadian and proud to be a part of the Peterborough community, but the comments we’ve received in support …

http://magazine.good.is/articles/peterborough-synagogue-mosque-arson-beth-israel-masjid-al-salaam

Don’t Underestimate Prophecies In The Holy Bible: They Are Not Mere Stories

 

Anti-Christ forces against Christians

The persecution of Christians has increased in many countries including China

We are in an era many feel embarrassed or overpowered by shyness to speak about the Holy Bible. Once people begin to talk about the scriptures, they are seen by non-believers as those losing their mind. To be a Christian is not by force and it is not by force either for a Christian to convert to Islam.

You can be an atheist, no one cares, but woe unto the atheist who tries to take God’s children and believers to the path of destruction. And woe unto Muslims that kill Christians and say they are doing it for Allah because true God has no pleasure in wickedness.

The reason when Jesus sent out his twelve disciples he told “Whoever acknowledges me before others, I will also acknowledge before my Father in heaven. But whoever disowns me before others, I will disown before my Father in heaven.” Many ignore the prophecies in the Bible, because they are spiritually blind and deaf, to hear and see the fulfillment of the scriptures taking place around the world today.

Jesus said, “They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.” Luke 5: 53. 

“Brother will betray brother to death, and a father his child; children will rebel against their parents and have them put to death. You will be hated by everyone because of me, but the one who stands firm to the end will be saved. When you are persecuted in one place, flee to another. Truly I tell you, you will not finish going through the towns of Israel before the Son of Man comes.” Matthew 10:21-23.

Those who have eyes can clearly see and those who have ears can clearly hear that all the prophecies in the Bible are gradually taking place. Christians are now being slaughtered like cows and those respondents say they are doing it for Allah, because ‘Allahu Akbar’-God is great. Give me a break, if the God you are worshiping is great, let that great God take his own actions. No one fights or kills for a great God, but only a weak God.

Domestic violence erupting daily as daughters fight against mothers and sons against fathers. There is no peace because everyone thinks he is right to do whatever is bad. The greed for money has increased violence and crime at every corner of the globe.

My father’s house of worship has become the den of thieves or drinking pubs, as churches are being converted to drinking place. Husband kills wife and wife kill husband for life insurance money. Father kills the baby and mother kill a baby. What a world of confusion enveloped by spiritual darkness?

Jesus spoke about love 13 times some of these occurrences are parallel scriptures such as someone asking Him what the greatest commandment of all. He preached some 190 times on hell, repentance, and judgment. Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude.

It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away. Featured Bible Verse: 1 Corinthians 13:4-8.

Archaeologists Unearth The Gate To Goliath’s Hometown

Goliath

Archaeologists uncover massive gate to Goliath’s biblical city

Original article published by thesechristiantimes.com

When will the secular world acknowledge that the Bible is full of facts? When will they acknowledge the truth of God’s word?

TIMES OF ISRAEL: Monumental Iron Age remains from the ancient Philistine city of Gath, once the home of the legendary biblical giant Goliath, surfaced this summer during excavations by a Bar-Ilan University-led team of archaeologists.

Gath, one of the five cities of the ancient foes of the Israelites, was one of the largest cities in the region in the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. The Old Testament describes Gath as the home of Goliath, the enormous warrior killed with a slingshot by the young Israelite David who would go on to found a dynasty of kings.

“We knew that Philistine Gath in the tenth to ninth century (BCE) was a large city, perhaps the largest in the land at that time,” excavation leader Professor Aren Maeir told Live Science. “These monumental fortifications stress how large and mighty this city was.”

According to Maeir, the monumental gate is among the largest ever found in Israel and confirms that Gath was one of the most influential cities in the region at the time.

READ MORE:http://www.timesofisrael.com/archaeologists-unearth-the-gate-to-goliaths-hometown/

People Speak Three: A Collection Of True Stories

 

People 2

People Speak is a collection of true stories written by real people about their own lives, collected by popular writer and editor Rabbi Chaim Walder, bestselling author of the series Kids Speak.

Rabbi Walder’s storytelling prowess continues to take us on a journey into people’s live, painting for us a vivid picture of their hardship as well as their triumphs. These real life stories have been hand selected from the multitude of letters that fill Rabbi Walder’s post-office box, each for the meaningful message it conveys and the life lessons to be learned from it.

The People Speak series has been translated into six languages and has captured the hearts of hundreds of thousands of people the world over for its unique ability to retell people’s life stories in an incredibly touching manner. This is the 3rd book in the series.

The Author

People 3

Chaim Walder is an author of literature for children, adolescents, and adults. He is also an educational counselor and manager of the Center for the Child and Family operated by the Bnei Brak municipality.

Walder was born in Haifa in 1969. He attended Yeshivat Kol Torah and Knesses Chizkiyahu before getting married and serving in the Israeli army as a soldier-teacher. After his discharge he continued to work as an educator and also embarked on a writing career.

Since 1990, Walder has been a regular columnist for the Yated Ne’eman, writing about social issues. He also hosts a popular radio talk show. He heads the Center for the Child and Family, run by the Bnei Brak municipality, and is a certified educational counselor working with children who have suffered trauma and abuse.[6]

In 2003, he received the Magen LeYeled (Defender of the Child) award from the Israel National Council for the Child.

http://www.amazon.com/Chaim-Walder/e/B00J17VYB2/

Tragedy In South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War Of 2006

Sultan

Cathy Sultan combines vital history and vivid personal interviews to relate the lives of the oft-ignored civilians of southern Lebanon and northern Israel during the July war of 2006 and its aftermath. She documents how thousands of area residents have been victimized by the hawkish, shortsighted policy decisions of Israel, Lebanon and the United States. Throughout the book, these narratives of mothers, soldiers, activists and ambulance drivers on both sides are memorable for their detail, honesty and the deep sense of tragedy they relate.

Tragedy in South Lebanon also addresses the media treatment of the war, systematically dispelling common myths about the region perpetuated by government and main-stream sources. Sultan discusses how divisive factions within the current Lebanese government leave the country teetering on the brink of yet more violence, imploring government officials on all sides to act with foresight, compassion and responsibility. Features include a chronology of Lebanese history, maps depicting wartime activity and a glossary of Middle Eastern terms.

The Author

Sultan 2

I grew up in Washington D.C.. Quite rebellious as a young woman, I yearned to escape from my native city and experience great adventures. My  dreams came true when I fell in love with a handsome young Lebanese physician, eloped against my parents’ wishes after a short courtship, had two children and in 1969 moved to Beirut, Lebanon, a city called the “Switzerland of the Middle East” and famous for its hospitality, its lovely Mediterranean climate and its exotic blend of Arab and Western cultures.

For six years I led the life of my dreams. My home was a rooftop apartment with a terrace full of flowers and a breathtaking view of the city. I was accepted and loved as a Lebanese. My husband had a successful medical practice and my children were growing up speaking English, French and Arabic.

But in April 1975, my life was abruptly turned upside down. On a quiet Sunday afternoon, the Christian Phalange militia attacked a bus full of Palestinians in a neighborhood not far from mine in East Beirut. This singular incident set off an infamous civil war that eventually engulfed the whole city. My tranquil treelined street, a block off Damascus Road and two blocks from the National Museum, became a deadly territorial divide: the infamous Green Line, separating East from West Beirut. Despite the constant danger, my feelings for my lover-city were slow to change. Instead of fleeing, my love affair with Beirut clouded my otherwise clear judgement  and we stayed through the first eight years of Lebanon’s bloody civil war.

I spent my days caring for my family, racing under the bombs to rescue my children from school and comforting my physician husband who spent his days treating wounded civilians. I kept my sanity during the war in large part because I loved to cook. I entertained family and friends constantly, trying as much as possible to incorporate some normalcy into our lives. Little by little I acquired the coping skills necessary to resist and survive in the absurd dysfunction of war. Eventually, though, war took a huge toll on my family and in 1983 we abandoned our beloved Beirut and returned to the States.

It took a number of years for all of us to regain our sanity. And it wasn’t until when my son, by then a junior at Harvard, asked me to record our adventures in Beirut that I began to think about writing my story. What began as a project for my children quickly became my way to mourn the loss of my beloved Beirut. Another reason had to do with the attitude of people I met when my husband and I settled down in the mid-West. They seemingly could not relate to my war stories and quickly became disinterested. This painful experience was the impetus that stimulated me to write, to pour my heart out, to clease my soul of the traumas of war.  A Beirut Heart: One Woman’s War is a memoir of my fourteen years in Beirut.

In March 2002, two years into the 2nd Intifada, I traveled to Israel-Palestine to better understand the conflict. My book “Israeli and Palestinian Voices: A Dialogue with Both Sides” is part adventure, part history, part travelogue, all bound together with a startling collection of interviews which I conducted first-hand in a variety of sometimes not very safe places.This book is a continuation of the my quest to bring peace to a region tragically gripped by obduracy and fanaticism, a region of the world I care deeply about, a region that is too often mis-represented by biased media coverage.

My husband, Michel, and I live in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, a lovely rural community an hour and a half east of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Currently, I sit on the Executive Board of the National Peace Foundation where I oversee a variety of Middle East educational projects.

Book USA’s Best Books awarded A Beirut Heart: One Woman’s War Best Autobiography of 2006. Israeli and Palestinian Voices: A Dialogue with Both Sides won USA’s Best Books of 2006 award in the category of History/Politics and received Honorable Mention in the category of Political Science from the Midwest Independent Publishers Association in 2006.

My latest non-fiction book Tragedy in South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War of 2006 is an account of the tragic 34 day war and its aftermath. It includes a chronology of Lebanese history, maps depicting wartime activity, a glossary of Lebanon’s political players, and, among others, interviews with both a Hezbollah fighter and an Israeli soldier, both of whom fought in the same battle.

Read about Cathy’s Latest Novel, The Syrian