10 Expectations of School Canteens

Original article published by:                  Momma 2

School 4Running a school canteen can be a tough and thankless job so firstly we would like to say “Thank You” to all of the volunteers and workers that give their time to our schools.

However, just as we expect a standard of education from our schools we should also be expecting a standard of nutrition from the school canteens. (When we say “we” we mean parents, teachers, society and the government)

Why should we all care?

Well parents should care because we are parents and we want our children to be happy and healthy. Teachers should care because when our children go into the school yard and eat unhealthy food they come back to the classroom and the teachers are on the receiving end of the mood swings. Society should care because “un”health care is costing us a fortune, plus our tax dollars are going into education and we should be expecting a good return on investment.

The Government should care … the Government should care like crazy … because health care and unemployment cost the Government big dollars. (Let’s face it, if the Government are spending big dollars on the sick and unemployed they will have less dollars to spend on the country and themselves)

So here are the top 10 expectations of school canteens we should all have:

  1. No added sugar – with so many natural, healthy alternatives this is so unnecessary. Don’t know how to cook with honey or brown rice syrup instead of sugar? Ask us!
  2. Stop using white wheat flour – Approximately 75% of Momma Green’s clients test positive for wheat intolerance. Imagine 75% of school children filling up on white wheat sausage rolls, pies, pasties, sandwiches? It has chaos written all over it! Don’t know how to cook without white wheat flour, check out our recipes.
  3. No high fructose syrup – high fructose syrup is just as bad as sugar and has exactly the same behavioral consequences.
  4. No maize – Just as we are seeing 75% of the community with wheat intolerance problems we are also seeing approximately 65% of the community experiencing an intolerance to maize.
  5. No Soft Drink – None at all, it doesn’t matter what type of drink it is they are all dangerous to the health of our children. No sports drinks, no energy drinks, no canned drinks! Let’s get some juice and smoothie bars happening. Don’t forget water, good quality, filtered water should e freely available in every classroom, after all, no water = no learning.
  6. No Coffee – No doubt some teens love the coffee high but the coffee low is frying their brains in the afternoon. If teachers want coffee put a coffee machine in the teacher’s lounge but coffee is not helping teachers or students focus in the afternoons.
  7. Don’t be a corner store – At a corner store or petrol station we expect to find highly processed, pre-packaged items like ice-blocks, chips and lollies. That is the reason many parents choose to avoid these stores but when you put them into our schools it makes it impossible for our children to avoid them, help us out here and take them out of our schools.
  8. No colors, flavors, preservatives or e-numbers – If our kids can’t read it, pronounce it or understand it we don’t want it in their mouths. Let’s be honest most adults can’t pronounce these ridiculously long names but we can tell you what the majority of them mean … behavioral and learning difficulties that’s what. Doesn’t this seem counter-productive?
  9. A plant based menu – Lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, lots of home-made ice-blocks, juices, smoothies, Mexican and Italian food which kids love and are so easy to add vegetables to. Fruit salad, crudites and dips, sweet potato chips … the list is endless … ask the kids what healthy foods they love and cook that, kids are creative you will be surprised by some of their ideas.
  10. Lastly and most importantly, Health over profit – With a lack of volunteers many schools are taking the easy way out and outsourcing their canteens, this is akin to privatization of the health care industry and deregulation of banking, put simply when money is the focus and people are a secondary concern money is going to win. So how do we fix this little dilemma?

How about Government incentives for canteens that adopt a better way of doing things? Wouldn’t this help everyone? It would help our canteens get creative, our children would be healthier and better able to learn, our teachers would be able to teach more effectively and as parents we would be picking up healthier, happier children that have been educated in the classroom and nourished during meal time. Isn’t that what we should all be expecting from our schools?

http://www.mommagreen.com/10-expectations-of-school-canteens/

My Motherland Offers Riches To The Tourist, So Why Are So Many Ghanaians Queuing Up To Come To Britain?

Culture 3

Ghana Says ‘Awaaba’- Welcome

A tale of two countries

Article by Henry Bonsu: A journalist and broadcaster (Originally published in TheGuardian)

While my primary government, in London, has been struggling to persuade people in Britain it has done enough to keep out the huddled masses from eastern Europe, my secondary government, in Accra, has also been preoccupied with travel. But rather than keeping undesirables out, Ghana’s government is more concerned with bringing people in: to spend their pounds, dollars and euros on business and tourism. And Ghanaians living in Britain are being asked to do their bit to help turn their country into Africa’s number one destination.

The tourism minister, Jake Obestebi-Lamptey, wants us to tell people that the former Gold Coast has become a “bird-watcher’s paradise, eco-tourism haven and an adventurer’s dream”. I’ve been wondering, though, how we can persuade the locals that they are sitting on such a goldmine. Stroll past the British high commission in Accra on any given evening and you’ll see Ghanaians bedding down, hoping to be the first in the visa queue the next morning.

And the 35,000 Ghanaians who were granted short-term entry to Britain this year, and the similar number of rejects, are just a fraction of those who dream of fleeing poverty. With doctors, nurses and teachers in the vanguard, ministers have been insisting on loyalty clauses for ambitious graduates. Not for nothing are we called the “Jews of Africa”, with an estimated 200,000 Ghanaians and their descendants settling in this country alone since independence.

Some people are used to thinking of Ghana as a “beacon” country of stability and inward investment – the symbolic destination for African-Caribbeans and Americans who wish to reclaim their heritage. Didn’t the IMF and World Bank lavish praise on former president Jerry Rawlings and his successor John Kufuor for their growth rates of 5%? Haven’t Japan and the EU given Ghana millions of dollars for skills training and poverty reduction?

Indeed they have. But when I visit my motherland this summer, it will, once again, be a tale of two countries. I’ll marvel at the beach hotels, luxury estates and free press, and revel in the power of the pound, which takes me from bohemian Brixton to the elite of Ghanaian society in six hours.

But this is the Ghana of the expatriate, and the rich business and political classes, who travel in and out of Britain, but have no intention of staying because their standard of living cannot be replicated in any European country.

The other Ghana is that of my cousin, a pastor, who ministers in the densely populated areas of Greater Accra. Maamobi is typical; a district of shanty housing, open sewers, malaria and mass unemployment. If you are lucky enough to have a job, your minimum wage has just gone up to 11,000 cedis (65p) a day.

My aunt is a typical resident, full of incredible hospitality, but she talks about her own future with little ambition, investing all hope in the children she’s managed to send abroad. Swatting away flies under the burning sun, she chats about whether things can change in “Mother Ghana”, with frequent references to gye nyame (“only God can help us”).

Perhaps such fatalism is understandable in a 60-year-old, who has witnessed colonial rule followed by decades of strong-man politics. But it is more distressing to see the fight go out of younger people, who can spend years in limbo, waiting for an overseas relative to pay some middle man a £3,000 “connection fee” to ease their passage. Ironically these are the same Ghanaians who, once here, will hold down two or three jobs, and contribute their share of an annual $1.5bn in remittances to sustain their family.

When cousins ask me how life is in Britain, I warn that although the 60s Nkrumah generation – which includes my parents – have largely succeeded in grooming their children for a middle-class future, things are more unpleasant for recent arrivals; that unless they have key qualifications (medical, educational or social work), they will have few choices – hence around 60% of London’s parking attendants are Ghanaian or Nigerian.

Perhaps naively I offer to help them do business locally alongside the mechanics, seamstresses and shopkeepers, who somehow manage to make ends meet, but then I hear of Ghana’s frighteningly high interest and inflation rates, the soaring price of utilities (a consequence of foreign-inspired privatisation), and the stop-go electricity supply. If, like my uncle in Kumasi, you take up farming, which comprises 36% of Ghana’s GDP, could you compete with cheap subsidised goods from the west, without being given access to European and US markets?

Would you wait for change to be delivered by Blair and Geldof’s African Commission? No, in those circumstances, £6 an hour as a security guard or a cleaner in a faraway country may sound like a better way to make money. Perhaps, like the dozens of others who’ll be bedding down outside the British high commission tonight, you’d rehearse your lines in preparation for an interview, and perhaps a passport to life in London’s underbelly. So, if you’re a British traveller huffing at the occasional delay at Heathrow, spare a thought for the other kind of global traffic heading in your direction with tourism the last thing on its mind.

The Future Of Your Wealth

Wealth
No one would deny that wealthy families face new and unique challenges that can make planning for the future more difficult than ever before. A byzantine U.S. tax code, increasingly complex global markets, and a growing cultural disdain for the “wealthy” pose new threats to the American investor. In this clear-sighted and urgent guide to managing your wealth,
        Matthew Shafer calls on his years of advising experience and his background as an economist to chart a new course toward financial success and peace of mind. Shafer outlines how new investment strategies based on cutting-edge analytics and behavioral finance can help you navigate today’s uncertain economic terrain and harness the mass psychology that drives market trends.
         Armed with a resilient outlook and an economist’s insight into the future, Shafer argues that the road ahead is not all doom and gloom-in fact; there are good reasons to be very optimistic about the future of your wealth. In April, Matt and The Future of Your Wealth was featured in the USA Today article, Seven Big Mistakes Couples Make in Retirement.
The Author
Wealth 2
Matt Shafer is a graduate of American University in Washington DC, where he obtained a BA in Economics and an MA in Economics with a concentration in International Financial Markets. In 2005, Matt attended the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkley where he obtained the title of Certified Investment Management Analyst (CIMA®) and joined the Investment Management Consultants Association (IMCA).
        Matt represents the 3rd generation of his family to provide wealth management advice to successful professionals, business owners and investors. He began his Wealth Management career in 1997 and currently leads a team of Financial Advisors based in South Florida, New England and Michigan.
         Matt has been named one of the top 1,000 Financial Advisors in the U.S. by Barron’s Magazine (2009) and has received several national recognitions including “Premier Advisor” by the National Association of Board Certified Advisory Practices (2012). He also writes a wealth management column for Worth Magazine. Matt lives in Boca Raton, Florida with his wife and two children.

Buy Low Sell High: Easy Way To Invest And When To Buy

Here is a great way to invest in stocks, ETFs, LEAPs and closed-end funds. My book shows an easy way to invest that tells you when to buy, when to sell, how much to buy or sell or when to do nothing. Book shows you how to use my Automatic Investment Management (AIM) in bull and bear markets.
Jeffery
You receive FREE 350-page Adobe Acrobat version and a Free 1-yr newsletter subscription when you buy.
          I would like to thank and complement Mr. Robert Lichello, author of How to Make $1,000,000 in the Stock Market Automatically who devised the investment system used in my book. I feel it is mandatory to read his book. I’m sure any good bookstore will have a copy or you could order a copy by looking on Amazon or one of the other websites.
Mr. L’s book planted a seed of inspiration to me like no other investment book I had ever read. I knew it was the way to invest. It so inspired me that I started this book and started investing under the system.At the time I read the book, the stock market was going great guns in the middle of a big bull market.
         I had some spare time and started charting stocks I liked under the system to see how well the system worked on real stocks. From those humble beginnings, this book began. It was written under strange conditions about as far away as you can get from the major stock markets – in Seoul, Korea; Maffle, Belgium; and Weilerbach, Germany. The beauty of the system is that it doesn’t even require you to be near the market to play. It’s so simple and yet so profitable. My hats off to Mr. Lichello and I hope this book helps spread his fine system to an even wider audience.I wish to make clear that while the system is Mr. Lichello’s, the ideas about using it in this book are my own.
          If you can think of some way to improve on my ideas, I’d be glad to give you credit in a future edition. And now I’ve come full circle I’ve gone from having a printed book for the last 20 years that I’ve been revising constantly to an e-book version. Here is your future edition, I’ve added information on how to adapt AIM for bear markets, added the latest list of online brokers and many other subtle changes. But the heart of the book remains the same because it is it is a strong heart, capable of handling the job AIM gives it in bull and now bear times.
              My original book was printed at Kinko’s, now called Kinko’s/FedEx using a spiral binding on 8.5 x 11″ paper or the traditional letter-size paper. This was done because I have many spreadsheets and other information that needed to be printed in large size so you would be able to read it easily. Obviously I can’t include all the spreadsheets in this e-book version because the book would be too large. So I am not including many of the spreadsheets in the actual e-book edition.
            However anybody who buys my e-book can e-mail me and will receive for free the full size 345 page + 8.5 x 11 Adobe Acrobat e-mail version of my book that will have all of the spreadsheets so that you can go to the particular Chapter and see the spreadsheets that I’m talking about in the e-book. Once you buy this e-book, just e-mail me at jeffee13athotmail.com (have to list this way) and tell me you have bought my e-book; please send me the free Adobe Acrobat version with the spreadsheets and I will be very happy to send it to you at no charge.And you will receive a free one-year subscription to my monthly investing letter that shows the best current stocks, ETFs, LEAPs (long-term options) and closed-end funds for the month.
The Author
Jeffrey 4
Jeffrey Weber was born in the Bronx. He had his first article published in Railroad Model Craftsman (model trains- published in Ramsey, NJ) in July, 1965, when he was 17. He has published his own newsletter for the last ten years. (http://www.jjjinvesting.com) A sample is available on his web site, which he designed. For over one year, he has published a weekly column for Talking Points newsletter entitled Contrarian Corner.
          Jeffrey went to college at the University of Arizona and got a Bachelor’s Degree in History & Government. Then went to a law school for a year and a half & then to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas for a Bachelor’s in Accounting. He worked for the US Army as an auditor and lived 17 years in Germany, Korea, Japan & Belgium.He has his published a number of books including The Island of Wanted.