“Life Is Very Hard. The Only People Who Really Live Are Those Who Are Harder Than Life Itself.”

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There are hundreds of definitions about ‘Life,’ but none gives me its true meaning, than this quote by author Nawal El Salaawi, “Life is very hard. The only people who really live are those who are harder than life itself.”  But who is this woman?

Nawal El Saadiaw has been pilloried, censored, imprisoned and exiled for her refusal to accept the oppression imposed on women by gender and class.

In her life and in her writings, this struggle against sexual discrimination has always been linked to a struggle against all forms of oppression: religious, racial, colonial and neo-colonial.

In 1969, she published her first work of non-fiction, Women and Sex ; in 1972, her writings and her struggles led to her dismissal from her job.

From then on there was no respite; imprisonment under Sadat in 1981 was the culmination of the long war she had fought for Egyptian women’s social and intellectual freedom. A Daughter of Isis is the autobiography of this extraordinary woman.

Author Nawal El Salaawi

Zero 5Nawal El Saadawi, also spelled Nawāl al-Saʿdāwī   (born Oct. 27, 1931, Kafr Ṭaḥlah, Egypt), Egyptian public health physician, psychiatrist, author, and advocate of women’s rights. Sometimes described as “the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab world,” El Saadawi was a feminist whose writings and professional career were dedicated to political and sexual rights for women.El Saadawi was educated at Cairo University (M.D., 1955), Columbia University in New York (M.P.H., 1966), and ʿAyn Shams University in Cairo (where she performed psychiatric research in 1972–74). In 1955–65 she worked as a physician at Cairo University and in the Egyptian ministry of health, and in 1966 she became the director-general of the health education department within the ministry.

In 1968 she founded Health magazine, which was shut down by Egyptian authorities several years later, and in 1972 she was expelled from her professional position in the ministry of health because of her book Al-marʾah wa al-jins (1969; Women and Sex), which was condemned by religious and political authorities.

El Saadawi was jailed in September 1981, and during the two months of her imprisonment she wrote Mudhakkirāt fī sijn al-nisāʾ (1984; Memoirs from the Women’s Prison) on a roll of toilet paper using a smuggled cosmetic pencil.

In 1982 El Saadawi founded the Arab Women’s Solidarity Association (AWSA) and later served as editor of the organization’s publication, Al-nūn. In 1991 the government closed down Al-nūn and then, several months later, AWSA itself. Due to her outspoken views, El Saadawi continued to face frequent legal challenges from political and religious opponents, including accusations of apostasy.

In 2002 a legal attempt was made by an Islamist lawyer to forcibly divorce her from her husband, and in May 2008 she won a case that had been brought against her by al-Azhar University, the major centre of Islamic learning, that included charges of apostasy and heresy.

El Saadawi’s novels, short stories, and nonfiction deal chiefly with the status of Arab women, as inMudhakkirāt tabībah (1960; Memoirs of a Woman Doctor), Al-khayt wa al-jidār (1972; The Thread and the Wall), Al-wajh al-ʿarī lī al-marʾah al-arabiyyah (1977; The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World), Al-ḥubb fī zaman al-nafṭ (1993; Love in the Kingdom of Oil), and Al-riwāyah (2004; The Novel).

The oppression of women by men through religion is the underlying theme of El Saadawi’s novel set in a mental institution, Jannāt wa Iblīs (1992; Jannāt and Iblīs). The female protagonists are Jannāt, whose name is the plural of the Arabic word for paradise, and Iblīs, whose name refers to the devil.

http://goo.gl/HrS2nD

Tame Your Tongue: The Mouth Is A Trouble Seeker

Mouth

According to the Cambridge English dictionary, the definition of the mouth is: The ​opening in the ​face of a ​person or ​animal, consisting of the ​lips and the ​space between them, or the ​space behind ​containing the ​teeth and the ​tongue. Other dictionaries simply define the mouth as: The opening through which food passes into the body.

I don’t agree with any of these definitions, because to me they are incomplete. If I were to define “The Mouth,” it should be: A small opening through which food passes into the body, speech; singing and noise are made and at the same time can put someone into a very big trouble.

The mouth serves man in his speech. He gets satisfaction after eating and drinking water. The beautiful songs or melodious tunes with words of comfort, all come from the mouth, making life worthy and happy to live, yet the same mouth can give one a lot of discomfort, worries, troubles, and even imprisonment.

In the Bible, there are so many warnings and pieces of advice over how people should tame the tongue. Here are just two of them. ‘Whoever keeps his mouth and his tongue keeps himself out of trouble. Proverbs 21:23. Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear. Ephesians 4:29.

In 1999, Glenn Hoddle lost his job as a coach to the England national team, after a shocking comment against disabled people. According to Glenn Hoddle “Disabled people are paying for sins in previous life.” Many people and the media rose against him, resulting to his dismissal from work. This is a typical example of the trouble the mouth can cause. Total disgrace and embarrassment aren’t it?

Bad comments always appear on social media and many passed unnoticed, but Liam Stacey spent 56 days in jail over his racial tweet against Bolton player Fabrice Muamba. Fabrice collapsed on the soccer field while playing, if Liam wasn’t prepared to wish him a speedy recovery, he shouldn’t say anything bad against the footballer at the point of death, instead he posted racial remarks on Twitter, provoking many people around the world.

This is not the first and the last careless talk or speech has cost people’s job or led one into jail. There is trouble brewing in every part of the world, and people’s life has been turned upside down, all because of what someone said to someone. I can say that there are two kinds of people. Those who think before they speak and those who speak before they think.

The latter one is those who are likely to be in trouble over what they say. In my country, there is a proverb which says “If you see a stone with a beard, just watch it and go. Don’t speak. This proverb is a warning to people who can’t shut their mouth.

There are many people who love to speak about other people. Even at work, many like to report other workers to the boss. In fact, just as some people are addicted to drug and alcohol, there are people also addicted to talking about other people. It’s their hobby and therefore can never stop.

Staying out of trouble is a simple rule to follow, yet many find it difficult to be trouble free. One of the rules which could keep people out of trouble is the practice of listening than speaking. An empty barrel makes a great noise. In life, great people do not speak much. They learn by listening.

It is better to be quiet for people to call you unsocial than to be called a gossiper, talkative and inquisitive. Proverbs 17:28. ‘Even a fool who keeps silent is considered wise, when he closes his lips, he is deemed intelligent.’

An African Female Politician’s Bitter Experience Of Racism In Catholic Center Rome

 

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Cécile Kyenge: Has suffered a great deal since she became Italy’s first black minister.

Worldwide, governments, associations and organizations, continue to fight for women trapped under the burden of religion, politics, discrimination, sexual abuse and violence. Many underestimate and regard women as domestic care providers, thus they are denied the respect they deserve in the society, despite many occupying high positions within different professional careers.

To create a peaceful society and discourage violence and racism, racial offence carries a heavy fine or possibly jail sentence in certain countries. For example in Britain, a person who uses threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour, is guilty of an offence with intention to stir up racial hatred. The offence carries a maximum sentence of seven years imprisonment or a fine, but this is not the case in many European countries, including Italy, Belgium and Holland. Racial comments against others pass  daily with impunity in these countries.

Italy is one of the countries which has broken every rule in regard to racial issues, in the name of Catholicism. The Mafioso infested country encourages racism, sodomy and child abuse, right under the nose of the Vatican City. Lack of good leadership, corruption and Mafioso activities, have spread Italians all over the world like a virus. Instead of dealing with corruption and crime which have weakened the country’s economic and industrial infrastructure, Italian government promotes racism.

Cecile Kyenge

Cécile Kyenge

Since Cécile Kyenge became Italy’s first black minister of integration, she has openly been insulted by the media and many politicians with impunity. Cristiano Za Garibaldi, the deputy mayor of the town of Diano Marina in the northern region of Liguria, posted on his public Facebook page that Miss Kyenge used to be on a road patronized by prostitutes for soliciting clients, of whom many were black. Racist taunts come in daily against her. At a rally someone hurled bananas at her.

Roberto Calderoli, a senior party member, also last year compared the black minister Cecile Kyenge to an orangutan. How can a minister suffer this kind of discrimination and racism, while European leaders meet daily in the heart of Brussels, to discuss political issues without doing anything about this?

Even though Diano Marina apologized after making the offensive comments on his Facebook page, in any civilized world or country, such a person shouldn’t continue to serve Italy in any office. Certain comments shouldn’t be tolerated. Racial problems whether it affects white or black shouldn’t be encouraged in any way.

America always demonstrates to be a great country on such issues, whether the president of the country is black or white, but recent racial activities in the country, reveal America now encourages racism than discouraging it.

Nevertheless, during the inauguration day of Barack Obama, among other politicians and leaders who were at the US Embassy in Brussels, was Philip de Winter, the leader of ‘Vlaamse Belang’ a political party which seeks the interest of the Flemish people and speaks much against foreigners. Unfortunately, he wasn’t accepted to attend the inauguration. He went home disappointed and furious. This is how it should be if the world cares about peace, racism and discrimination.

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I find it a total disgrace, as European leaders converge at Brussels daily for summit and European Union programs, yet such disturbing racial issues of this kind going on in Italy and many places, but haven’t become an issue of concern to European leaders.

Racial problems should be a priority in every part of the world, because when violence erupts, it affects everyone. They shouldn’t ignore because it doesn’t affect them. A healthy nation thrives on peace, justice and respect but not racism and violence.

 

The African Equation

A new masterpiece from the author of “The Swallows of Kabul.” Frankfurt MD Kurt Krausmann is devastated by his wife’s suicide. Unable to make sense of what happened, Kurt agrees to join his friend Hans on a humanitarian mission to the Comoros. But, sailing down the Red Sea, their boat is boarded by Somali pirates and the men are taken hostage.

Equation

The arduous journey to the pirates’ desert hideout is only the beginning of Kurt’s odyssey. He endures imprisonment and brutality at the hands of captors whose failings are all too human. As the situation deteriorates, it is fellow prisoner, Bruno, a long-time resident in Africa, who shows Kurt another side to the wounded yet defiant continent he loves.

A giant of francophone writing, Algerian author Yasmina Khadra takes current events as a starting point to explore opposing views and myths of Africa and the West, ultimately delivering a powerful message of friendship, resilience, and redemption.

Yasmina Khadra is the pen name of Mohammed Moulessehoul, a former Algerian army officer and now director of the Algerian Cultural Center in Paris. In November 2013, he announced his candidacy for the presidency of Algeria.

The Author

Khadra

Yasmina Khadra is the pseudonym of the Algerian writer Mohammed Moulessehoul, born in 1956. A high ranking officer in the Algerian army, he went into exile in France in 2000, where he now lives in seclusion.

In his several writings on the civil war in Algeria, Khadra exposes the current regime and the fundamentalist opposition as the joint guilty parties in the Algerian Tragedy. Before his admission of identity in 2001, a leading critic in France wrote, ‘A he or a she? It doesn’t matter. What matters is that Yasmina Khadra is today one of Algeria’s most important writers.’

http://www.amazon.com/Yasmina-Khadra/e/B001H9TWCK