Aids And Ebola Medical Crimes: Africa Wants Justice

African children are example to follow

In the midst of Aids, Ebola and Lassa fever, African children are always happy

By Joel Savage and Johan Van Dongen

Illiteracy is not having the ability to read and write.  According to UNESCO, 774 million people aged 15 and older are illiterate. 52 percent live in South and West of Asia and 22 percent in sub-Saharan Africa. Even though literacy is very important and is a human right, illiteracy is one of the biggest problems in Africa today.

The impact of illiteracy in Africa is very heavy to the extent that Burkina Faso, South Sudan, Niger, Mali, Chad, Somalia, Ethiopia, Guinea, Nigeria and the Republic of Benin, are seriously affected. It is not surprised that some pastors are now claiming that Aids and Ebola are God’s curses, because of lack of reading. Some clans and tribes believe they have offended God, thus; deserve such punishment. Can you imagine how the impact of illiteracy can affect the way people think?

With such kind of thinking among the literacy and the continued dependence of African leaders on Europe and America, bringing those responsible of the medical crimes in Africa, (Belgium, Holland, Germany, France, America etc) to face justice, has been a dream of illusion to pursued. It is heart-wrenching that many years after independence swept through Africa, African leaders continue to bring their bowls on shores of Europe and America, begging for food and finance, while the continent has everything available to be used towards its development and creating jobs for the common people.

The inability to solve internal problems and financing of projects, have made African leaders a sort of puppets on strings, being pulled by Europe and America. As the proverb goes in Ghana, “If your hand is in someone’s mouth, don’t knock his head,’ African leaders can’t confront Europe and America over the crimes they have committed against the continent, because they still depend on them. That actually doesn’t make African leaders smart at all.

If Africans love to read, they will not continue to say that Aids and Ebola are curses from God, after many scientists , including Dutch Professor Johan Van Dongen have challenged Europe and America that Aids and Ebola were  engineered as bio-weapons as a means to depopulate Africa.

If African leaders have totally disappointed Africans and continued to show their incompetence, the African population, including everyone who has lost his or her loved one to Aids and Ebola,  must let Europe and America pay for their crimes. They should demand the justice they need. Yesterday were Aids and Lassa fever, today is Ebola, who knows what comes next?

Poverty And Illiteracy Are Causes To Witch Accusation In Africa

 

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Emotional picture of the little-neglected child accused of witchcraft taking some water from Anja

Africa literacy facts reveal more than 1 in 3 adults cannot read.  182 million adults are unable to read and write and 48 million youths (ages 15-24) are illiterate. 22% of primary aged children are not in school, adding up to about 30 million primary aged children out of school.

With such a high rate of illiteracy, coupled with poverty, Africa is much influenced by superstition. Till now many societies in Africa are often immersed in beliefs such as witchcraft, ghosts, spirits etc, putting the lives of many people, including children and old women in danger.

The story of this innocent starved, naked little boy, went viral when accused of being a witch in Nigeria and was shunned by the community as a result. His story has come to light after a picture of a Danish woman  Anja Ringgren Lovén feeding the little boy, now named Hope, went viral.

Anja is the founder of the African Children’s Aid Education and Development Foundation, which attempts to save ‘witch children’ and change attitudes of Nigerian communities towards this archaic and cruel practice.

                         When a child is accused of being a witch by any member of the village, with many times accusations coming from the child’s parents themselves, they are often tortured or killed.
Parents risk being killed if they let their child stay after an accusation. Anja’s foundation is working hard to help educate the local communities, many of which are poor and uneducated, which keeps this practice alive. When she posted this photo of Hope on her     Facebook, she accompanied it with a powerful message.
                       “Thousands of children are being accused of being witches and we’ve both seen the torture of children, dead children, and frightened children. This footage shows why I fight. Why I sold everything I own. Why I’m moving out in uncharted territory,” she said. “I have chosen to call the boy Hope for right now, we all hope that he survives.”
                        Today he is doing well, with daily blood transfusions and a loving group of volunteers taking care of him.
                          Last year, seven people in the East African country of Tanzania were killed following accusations of witchcraft. They were attacked and burnt to death by a mob of villagers who accused them of engaging in witchcraft.
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Hope, the new name of the child saved by Anja recovering.

The Embrace Of Illiteracy As Traditional Value In Africa

Female circumcision

A traumatized woman after circumcision

Africa is a vast continent filled with varieties of customs, traditions, cultures and languages. Some of these outdated traditions and customs are seen as senseless, useless, valueless, illiteracy and complete ignorance.

Female Circumcision: It is estimated that about 140 million girls and women worldwide are currently living with disastrous effects of female circumcision. Horrific procedures have severely traumatized and psychologically affected thousands of women. Female circumcision is practiced in 26 countries across Africa.

In the Republic of Sierra Leone, an ethnic group called “The Bondo Society” still carries this outdated tradition. Gambia launched a three-year program aimed to abolish Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). Female circumcision is the number one on my list as illiteracy taken as traditional or custom.

Tribal deformity in Nigeria

Horrible tribal marks of a Yoruba woman

Horrible tribal marks in Nigeria: In the olden days, tribal marks were used as identification, especially in Yoruba lands, such as Ogun, Oyo, Ondo States, and Benin. Should in case something happens to you, your tribal marks would help to identify the tribe you originate or where you come from. The illiteracy behind this barbarous act has disfigured the face of thousands of Nigerians.

Some of the marks are so horrible that they attract people and gossip. Some women have to live with it for the rest of their lives without husbands.  Time changes as we step into the world of technology and development. Disfiguring of the face as tribal marks is gradually fading away or completely stopped in many places thought out the country.

 

In South Africa, is a relatively landlocked country called Swaziland. The king of the country, Mswati III has 14 wives. This illiteracy which had been in existence for years is followed as a tradition.

The 46-year old monarch has ruled over Swaziland, which is on the brink of economic disaster for 28 years. He can’t even solve the problems of 40 per cent of Swazis that are unemployed, the country’s highest HIV infection rate per capita in the world, and the life expectancy of 46 years among the world’s lowest, yet at every annual reed dance, the king takes the opportunity to take a new wife. Is this king ignorant, serious or a joker?

Illiteracy swapped as a custom

Swaziland King Mswati III chooses a wife annually during Reed dance. Photo credit: Reuters

He recently married a girl of fifteen. Apart from the continued abuse of young girls, the king’s  wealth includes  expensive cars (fleets of top-of-the-range Mercedes and BMW cars, at least one Rolls-Royce and a $500,000 Daimler Chrysler flagship Maybach 62) and the private jet ($17 million), while the citizens wallow in poverty. This money can be invested into education and health care to develop his country. Have you seen how stupid and ignorant some of these African leaders are?

 

Illiteracy swapped as a traditional value

Ignorance or illiteracy? Swaziland King Mswati III has made Africa a laughing stock in the eyes of the Advanced World.

When Asia is making headlines around the world, it’s about business, but in the case of Africa, it’s about poverty, corruption, war, conflicts and such stupid traditions and customs, draining Africa’s coffers and under-developing Africa. I have said this and I will repeat once again “If African leaders want the Advanced World to respect them, they should show a little intelligence and maturity because they underestimate and laugh at Africa.