It’s Just Beautiful A Woman Holds Her Breast When Running, But That Doesn’t Mean It’s Going To Fall Off

 

Kente is now internationally known and often used by African-Americans

The slice of Ghanaian culture presented in Kente cloth by a pretty woman

The diversity of culture is very interesting and broad subject. I like to share interesting articles with readers eager to know about other people’s culture, custom and heritage. Africans used proverbs a lot in their daily conversation and admonition. 

In 1985, my first time in Freetown, Sierra Leone, I entered into a restaurant and ordered for a plate of rice. On top of my rice was a strange greenish stew, which wasn’t good for me after tasting it. I asked the woman what it was and she told me it was prepared by cassava leaves.

She said I can try potato leaves stew,  if I want. I said ‘No’ and I went away. Months after living in Freetown and knowing much about their culture and food, I found out how delicious cassava leaves stew was. From time to time, I requested for the food I once rejected, any I went to the restaurant. It’s interesting to know about someone’s culture and food.

“It’s just beautiful a woman holds her breast when running, but that doesn’t mean it’s  going to fall off,” is one of Ghana’s intriguing proverbs.

The sight of a woman creates first impression. There are many things that put men off, especially when a woman’s hair isn’t well styled or when shabbily dressed.

In Africa it’s very common to see women running. I don’t think any one will find a woman attractive as her breasts flap on her chest as she runs.

Holding her breast while running, is one of the ways revealing how conscious a woman is over her body and truly men find it nice in that way too.

Tourism: Step Into The Paradise Taste Of Tropical Fruits In Ghana

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Home sweet home: Joel Savage enjoys the sweet juicy water of fresh coconut.

The axiom, “All work and no play, makes Jack a dull boy” might have originally been conceived by a domestic idealist, who knows the truth. Working hard without a break can affect your health. The impact can take its toll on you.

This is the reason I decided to visit my mother at the age of 80, in Ghana, after five years. Seeing her grey hair, but strong and healthy, boosted my happiness. In my daily prayers I always ask God to give her long life, to enjoy her fruits of labour, and it seems He has answered my prayers.

My mother after losing her husband at the age of 44, in 1976, (The Writer Died) https://goo.gl/hLBqj4, left with eight children, without any support, took the responsibility alone to make sure that we were fed, clothed, accommodated and educated.

In Ghana, I visited many places including the Cape Coast castle, in the central region of Ghana and some villages, such as ‘Akatechiwa’ which has intriguing story leading to the village’s name. I will be sharing all the interesting articles pertaining my visit with you very soon on social media.

Apart from my adventure and exploration, I enjoyed the fresh tropical fruits, such as coconut, mango, sweet apple etc. Many in foreign countries, such as Europeans and Americans may have the experience of tasting juicy canned tropical fruits, but nothing compares to the original fresh taste of tropical fruits taken moments from the trees in Ghana or Africa generally.

Many Europeans and Americans yearly make a trip to Ghana to explore its ancient castles and forts and some have settled finally in the country, saying good bye to Europe and America. Don’t let the foreign media deceive you. Be part of those visiting Ghana.

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The Coconut tree: I know that there are thousands of readers interested in non-fiction genre of books, thus; one of my goals is to share my non-fiction books through diversity of culture. My utterly and compelling collections are destined to capture the reader’s attention and interest, to learn about other people’s culture and heritage.

My books are in the categories of travel, immigration, health and entertainment. The personal account of the stories reflect on the places I visited in Africa, such as Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Togo, Benin and Gambia. And in Europe, it’s about life in Barcelona, Spain, Aahus, Denmark, England, Amsterdam, Holland, Rome, Italy and Antwerp, Belgium.

The African stories act like a guide to European and Americans tourists. The books will teach you how to avoid being a victim to thieves, armed robbers and immigration crooks, that prey on nationals and foreigners, while the Europeans stories teach Africans how to survive in Europe, without papers and crime.

My Motherland Offers Riches To The Tourist, So Why Are So Many Ghanaians Queuing Up To Come To Britain?

Culture 3

Ghana Says ‘Awaaba’- Welcome

A tale of two countries

Article by Henry Bonsu: A journalist and broadcaster (Originally published in TheGuardian)

While my primary government, in London, has been struggling to persuade people in Britain it has done enough to keep out the huddled masses from eastern Europe, my secondary government, in Accra, has also been preoccupied with travel. But rather than keeping undesirables out, Ghana’s government is more concerned with bringing people in: to spend their pounds, dollars and euros on business and tourism. And Ghanaians living in Britain are being asked to do their bit to help turn their country into Africa’s number one destination.

The tourism minister, Jake Obestebi-Lamptey, wants us to tell people that the former Gold Coast has become a “bird-watcher’s paradise, eco-tourism haven and an adventurer’s dream”. I’ve been wondering, though, how we can persuade the locals that they are sitting on such a goldmine. Stroll past the British high commission in Accra on any given evening and you’ll see Ghanaians bedding down, hoping to be the first in the visa queue the next morning.

And the 35,000 Ghanaians who were granted short-term entry to Britain this year, and the similar number of rejects, are just a fraction of those who dream of fleeing poverty. With doctors, nurses and teachers in the vanguard, ministers have been insisting on loyalty clauses for ambitious graduates. Not for nothing are we called the “Jews of Africa”, with an estimated 200,000 Ghanaians and their descendants settling in this country alone since independence.

Some people are used to thinking of Ghana as a “beacon” country of stability and inward investment – the symbolic destination for African-Caribbeans and Americans who wish to reclaim their heritage. Didn’t the IMF and World Bank lavish praise on former president Jerry Rawlings and his successor John Kufuor for their growth rates of 5%? Haven’t Japan and the EU given Ghana millions of dollars for skills training and poverty reduction?

Indeed they have. But when I visit my motherland this summer, it will, once again, be a tale of two countries. I’ll marvel at the beach hotels, luxury estates and free press, and revel in the power of the pound, which takes me from bohemian Brixton to the elite of Ghanaian society in six hours.

But this is the Ghana of the expatriate, and the rich business and political classes, who travel in and out of Britain, but have no intention of staying because their standard of living cannot be replicated in any European country.

The other Ghana is that of my cousin, a pastor, who ministers in the densely populated areas of Greater Accra. Maamobi is typical; a district of shanty housing, open sewers, malaria and mass unemployment. If you are lucky enough to have a job, your minimum wage has just gone up to 11,000 cedis (65p) a day.

My aunt is a typical resident, full of incredible hospitality, but she talks about her own future with little ambition, investing all hope in the children she’s managed to send abroad. Swatting away flies under the burning sun, she chats about whether things can change in “Mother Ghana”, with frequent references to gye nyame (“only God can help us”).

Perhaps such fatalism is understandable in a 60-year-old, who has witnessed colonial rule followed by decades of strong-man politics. But it is more distressing to see the fight go out of younger people, who can spend years in limbo, waiting for an overseas relative to pay some middle man a £3,000 “connection fee” to ease their passage. Ironically these are the same Ghanaians who, once here, will hold down two or three jobs, and contribute their share of an annual $1.5bn in remittances to sustain their family.

When cousins ask me how life is in Britain, I warn that although the 60s Nkrumah generation – which includes my parents – have largely succeeded in grooming their children for a middle-class future, things are more unpleasant for recent arrivals; that unless they have key qualifications (medical, educational or social work), they will have few choices – hence around 60% of London’s parking attendants are Ghanaian or Nigerian.

Perhaps naively I offer to help them do business locally alongside the mechanics, seamstresses and shopkeepers, who somehow manage to make ends meet, but then I hear of Ghana’s frighteningly high interest and inflation rates, the soaring price of utilities (a consequence of foreign-inspired privatisation), and the stop-go electricity supply. If, like my uncle in Kumasi, you take up farming, which comprises 36% of Ghana’s GDP, could you compete with cheap subsidised goods from the west, without being given access to European and US markets?

Would you wait for change to be delivered by Blair and Geldof’s African Commission? No, in those circumstances, £6 an hour as a security guard or a cleaner in a faraway country may sound like a better way to make money. Perhaps, like the dozens of others who’ll be bedding down outside the British high commission tonight, you’d rehearse your lines in preparation for an interview, and perhaps a passport to life in London’s underbelly. So, if you’re a British traveller huffing at the occasional delay at Heathrow, spare a thought for the other kind of global traffic heading in your direction with tourism the last thing on its mind.

Tom Jones: Why Is He Getting DNA Test If He Has Black Ancestors?

Tom Jones is recovering in hospital after he fell ill and was forced to pull out of a concert in Monaco

Tom Jones has revealed that he wants to get his DNA tested to find out if he has any black ancestors, with the music legend admitting that he has “always wondered” if he is mixed race. The 75-year-old is keen to get the test done in the near future so that he can gain a better understanding of his heritage.

Speaking to Times magazine, the star explained: “A lot of people still think I’m black. When I first came to America, people who had heard me sing on the radio would be surprised that I was white when they saw me.  “Because of my hair, a lot of black people still tell me that I’m just passing as white.”

When Tom’s mother, Freda, who is of Welsh and English descent, gave birth to him doctors reportedly asked her if she had any “black blood” after she developed dark patches of skin following her labour.

Tom clarified: “When I was born, my mother came out in big dark patches all over her body.
“They [the doctors and midwives] asked if she had any black blood and she said she didn’t know. I’m going to get my DNA tested.

“I want to find out.”
Well, if the producers of ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ are listening, we think we may just have nabbed their first star of the next series…

Article originally published in Yahoo News: https://uk.celebrity.yahoo.com/post/132396368359/tom-jones-is-getting-his-dna-tested-to-see-if-he