Obesity: A Major Public Health Epidemic In Both The Developed And The Developing World.

OBY 5

“Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980. In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese, 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese. 

Most of the world’s population live in countries where overweight and obesity kills more people than underweight. 42 million children under the age of 5 were overweight or obese in 2013. Obesity is preventable,” according to the World Health Organisation. 

In an effort to fight against increasing obesity, the government of Dubai recently offered residents, one gram of gold, which worth approximately $45 at that time, for every kilogram of weight loss. To make it a successful program, the weight loss was fixed in the time of Ramadan, when every Muslim eat less. The fact is serious obesity sends people early to the grave.

Food is extremely delicious, especially when well prepared to meet the right taste, but if you don’t have self-control, the ability or strength to fight food addiction, then you should know that you are inviting so many health hazards into your life. People suffering from obesity can tell you about criticisms and gossips against them daily in public, office or wherever they go.

In Europe, the United Kingdom has the higher rate of obesity and overweight people than anywhere in Western Europe, according to an authoritative global study that raises fresh concerns about the likely health consequences. In the UK, 67 percent of men and 57 percent of women are either fighting against obese or overweight. Published in the Lancet Medical Journal, according to the Global Burden of Disease Study, more than a quarter of children, 26 percent of boys and 29 percent of girls are also overweight in the UK.

Going to the gym to keep the body fit is a daunting task for many. If you want to avoid going to the gym to work against overweight, then eating the right food should be everyone’s priority. One needs to understand what some foods are high in saturated fats and cholesterol, you must, therefore, avoid these foods which build up in your stomach, arteries, and veins.

For example, the yolk of an egg has 300 mg of cholesterol; it is, therefore, better and healthy to eat the white instead. Eating 10 whole eggs in a week gives one 3 grams of cholesterol in your body. Another way of avoiding obesity is to stop eating fried foods since they absorb the fats that they are cooked in.

There are so many recommended books and online articles in health journals, on how to avoid or deal with obesity and overweight. You can do it too since many have done it. Prevention is always better than cure.

The Development Of Africa And Asia Through The Lenses Of Technology And Communication

ICT 3Modern technology, through communication and internet have influenced and enhanced Africa’s development, in a way that lives of many throughout the continent have significantly improved. The demand of ICT companies in Africa, have created fast growing mobile and internet markets providing employment to thousands of people.

A country without technology economy can never grow. It is therefore the effort of every government in Africa to invest into ICT facilities to sustain the economy. Technology is therefore essential and important establishing sustainable startup companies and firms in Africa. Today, several major technology trends are shaping the lives of Africans and the economies, with many formidable mobile companies, with communication tools such as the internet and telephone enabling quick access to every part of the world.

Let’s have a glance at the effect of ICT trends in Ghana, choosing MTN as an example. Officially launched in 1994, MTN Group is a multinational telecommunications group, operating in 21 countries throughout Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The MTN Group is listed on the JSE Securities Exchange in South Africa under the share code: “MTN” Detailed Report Data for 30 September 2010, MTN recorded 134,4 million subscribers across its operations in Afghanistan, Benin, Botswana, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Guinea Republic, Iran, Liberia, Nigeria, Republic of Congo (Congo Brazzaville), Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Uganda, Yemen and Zambia.

MTN MobileMoney,  a service which allows users to perform micro-financing and transfer money from their mobile device, has been adopted across the continent. The basic satisfaction behind this is the answer to customers’ dream of enjoying basic financial services on their mobile phones everywhere they go in Ghana and above all one doesn’t need a bank account to cash his or her money. This service provided by MTN in partnership with banks is also available on the internet. MTN MobileMoney service is recommended to be secure, simple, fast and convenient solution for money transfer and other transactions including reloading of MTN airtime units.

Let’s have a quick glance at India. What is a successful strategic technology? That is an existing technology that has matured, which is the case of India.  The country has become an IT brand among the global countries over the years, with strong policies base in education, well-established telecommunication & infrastructure facilities and favourable market conditions that prevail. Many Indian cities are now holding prominent places in the global IT map. Now India stands out as one of the biggest and fastest growing economies in the world.

The country’s matured technology offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage, continuing expansion in foreign firms owned establishments in India, with its emergence as favorite sector for local Indian investors and talented entrepreneurs. Yet Indian IT industry is still only in its very early stages of development both internationally and domestically and has strong growth potential.

The industry growing at 40 percent per annum between 1994 and 1999, with software exports alone more than 50 percent, earned revenue growth IT industry from $1 billion in 1990 to $8 billion in 2000, envisioned to reach $100 billion in 2008.

“While predicting the future is hard to do, it’s indubitable that the Internet and mobile technology will improve the lives of many Africans in the years to come,” said tech expert Rudy de Waele, who assists global brands and companies with cutting edge open innovation strategy on how to mobilize their business and products through projects, research, strategy, presentations, workshops and brainstorms.

ICT developed and developing continents, such as Africa and Asia hold its own communications future, as talent shines through and the continent becomes leading innovator, manufacturer and exporter throughout the continents and of the rest of the world.

My Motherland Offers Riches To The Tourist, So Why Are So Many Ghanaians Queuing Up To Come To Britain?

Culture 3

Ghana Says ‘Awaaba’- Welcome

A tale of two countries

Article by Henry Bonsu: A journalist and broadcaster (Originally published in TheGuardian)

While my primary government, in London, has been struggling to persuade people in Britain it has done enough to keep out the huddled masses from eastern Europe, my secondary government, in Accra, has also been preoccupied with travel. But rather than keeping undesirables out, Ghana’s government is more concerned with bringing people in: to spend their pounds, dollars and euros on business and tourism. And Ghanaians living in Britain are being asked to do their bit to help turn their country into Africa’s number one destination.

The tourism minister, Jake Obestebi-Lamptey, wants us to tell people that the former Gold Coast has become a “bird-watcher’s paradise, eco-tourism haven and an adventurer’s dream”. I’ve been wondering, though, how we can persuade the locals that they are sitting on such a goldmine. Stroll past the British high commission in Accra on any given evening and you’ll see Ghanaians bedding down, hoping to be the first in the visa queue the next morning.

And the 35,000 Ghanaians who were granted short-term entry to Britain this year, and the similar number of rejects, are just a fraction of those who dream of fleeing poverty. With doctors, nurses and teachers in the vanguard, ministers have been insisting on loyalty clauses for ambitious graduates. Not for nothing are we called the “Jews of Africa”, with an estimated 200,000 Ghanaians and their descendants settling in this country alone since independence.

Some people are used to thinking of Ghana as a “beacon” country of stability and inward investment – the symbolic destination for African-Caribbeans and Americans who wish to reclaim their heritage. Didn’t the IMF and World Bank lavish praise on former president Jerry Rawlings and his successor John Kufuor for their growth rates of 5%? Haven’t Japan and the EU given Ghana millions of dollars for skills training and poverty reduction?

Indeed they have. But when I visit my motherland this summer, it will, once again, be a tale of two countries. I’ll marvel at the beach hotels, luxury estates and free press, and revel in the power of the pound, which takes me from bohemian Brixton to the elite of Ghanaian society in six hours.

But this is the Ghana of the expatriate, and the rich business and political classes, who travel in and out of Britain, but have no intention of staying because their standard of living cannot be replicated in any European country.

The other Ghana is that of my cousin, a pastor, who ministers in the densely populated areas of Greater Accra. Maamobi is typical; a district of shanty housing, open sewers, malaria and mass unemployment. If you are lucky enough to have a job, your minimum wage has just gone up to 11,000 cedis (65p) a day.

My aunt is a typical resident, full of incredible hospitality, but she talks about her own future with little ambition, investing all hope in the children she’s managed to send abroad. Swatting away flies under the burning sun, she chats about whether things can change in “Mother Ghana”, with frequent references to gye nyame (“only God can help us”).

Perhaps such fatalism is understandable in a 60-year-old, who has witnessed colonial rule followed by decades of strong-man politics. But it is more distressing to see the fight go out of younger people, who can spend years in limbo, waiting for an overseas relative to pay some middle man a £3,000 “connection fee” to ease their passage. Ironically these are the same Ghanaians who, once here, will hold down two or three jobs, and contribute their share of an annual $1.5bn in remittances to sustain their family.

When cousins ask me how life is in Britain, I warn that although the 60s Nkrumah generation – which includes my parents – have largely succeeded in grooming their children for a middle-class future, things are more unpleasant for recent arrivals; that unless they have key qualifications (medical, educational or social work), they will have few choices – hence around 60% of London’s parking attendants are Ghanaian or Nigerian.

Perhaps naively I offer to help them do business locally alongside the mechanics, seamstresses and shopkeepers, who somehow manage to make ends meet, but then I hear of Ghana’s frighteningly high interest and inflation rates, the soaring price of utilities (a consequence of foreign-inspired privatisation), and the stop-go electricity supply. If, like my uncle in Kumasi, you take up farming, which comprises 36% of Ghana’s GDP, could you compete with cheap subsidised goods from the west, without being given access to European and US markets?

Would you wait for change to be delivered by Blair and Geldof’s African Commission? No, in those circumstances, £6 an hour as a security guard or a cleaner in a faraway country may sound like a better way to make money. Perhaps, like the dozens of others who’ll be bedding down outside the British high commission tonight, you’d rehearse your lines in preparation for an interview, and perhaps a passport to life in London’s underbelly. So, if you’re a British traveller huffing at the occasional delay at Heathrow, spare a thought for the other kind of global traffic heading in your direction with tourism the last thing on its mind.

The Killing Indulgence: Don’t Be A Slave To Drug Abuse

Drug is something if you go into it, you can't get out of it.

The use of hard drug like cocaine has increased rapidly destroying the lives of many people

Crime and illegal activities, like drug peddling, are destroying our community and putting the health of individuals in danger. The disastrous effect of drugs on mankind is a global phenomenon that governments are yet to find a common solution. Consumption of dangerous drugs is tearing Europe and America apart, just like how AIDS has completely ruined Africa. On almost every street in Europe, junkies are commonly seen, especially in Spain, Germany and Holland. Hard drug has transformed able-bodied men into some fearful creatures like actors set for a horror movie.

Some are gaunt at the edge of death. Others have lost their families and properties. Some are insane leading them to permanent confinement in mental institutions. Similar to fight against terrorism worldwide, governments are fighting against drug abuse to ensure good health for its citizens. The drug menace, destruction and its drastic effect on people have dented and inflated the medical cost of many countries which citizens have been plagued by illegal usage of harmful drugs.

Every continent including America and Europe is at war over drug trafficking for almost a century. Surveillance and security at airports and border posts have increased but still hard drugs find its way into the hands of Americans and Europeans, taking its toll on citizens. Mexican drug barons and Italian mafias through different illegal sources bring drugs to the shores of Europe and America. Even though thousands of drug traffickers have been arrested, yet deadly drugs are still flooded in America and Europe.

Once hooked on drugs, they can’t do without them. The more they take it, the more they want it. In order to satisfy their demand, junkies resort to stealing anything they could lay their hands on. This has caused a sharp increase in crime. The question is: Are the authorities winning the war on drugs? The harvest is plentiful but the labourers are few. Despite previous and recent progress in arresting drug dealers and seizing tons of illegal drugs, the trade still goes on unabated.

Drug

Is the  “The global war on drugs is it yielding positive results or failing? From every angle, one could clearly see that the war on drugs is totally futile. New research has revealed more dangerous illegal drugs have become cheaper while their potency increased, indicating that efforts to control the global illegal drug market through law enforcement are failing.

War on drugs has totally failed that governments wish to consider decriminalizing drugs in a bid to cut consumption and weaken the power of organized crime gangs. Until the war on drugs is successful, many will continue to live in the abyss, taking them into their untimely grave. Harmful drugs had spread to the extent that it is tried by many people including children and pregnant women, putting the babies’ lives in danger.

Children are now using cocaine in large quantities like adults. It’s very hard to see one you loved consumed by drugs. In fact, the war on drugs is the responsibility of everyone. Parents have a role to play as well, by letting your child know that you have concerns about his well-being, educating the child on how dangerous drugs can be. When the child is already deep into drugs the only solution is to enter the child into rehab.

Foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man is homeless.

 

Life is very tough

A homeless woman, God only knows how she feels

In the Bible, Jesus spoke in parables, using stories and illustrations to speak to his followers. He once said, “The foxes have holes and the birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head.” His teachings and parables may be rejected by non-believers or atheists, yet his teachings reflect on our lives today.

Do you know that in 2005, a global survey by the United Nations, estimated over 100 million people were homeless worldwide and as many as 1 billion people lacked adequate housing?  In Europe alone, there are 3 million homeless people, while Columbia registers 9.5 million and 24.4 million in Nigeria. There are also hundreds of homeless people in Canada, Australia and the United States of America.

There are certain factors contributing to homelessness. Physical disabilities, depression, mental illness, drug abuse, broken homes, domestic problems and lack of employment, are some of the causes leading to homelessness. At times one may be free from the mentioned problems, but certain factors can push someone to live on the street.

That’s my story. As illegal immigrant in Europe, trying to survive, I slept at rough places in Rome, including the central train station and an old abandoned Pasta factory called ‘Pantanella.’ One crossing the street or seeing a homeless person might wrongly judge the victim, but problems too tough to handle often push them to be homeless.

Like many Africans, my dream was to make it big in Europe, by going to school and take the opportunity to integrate, but soon I realized that not all that glitter is gold. To avoid being a drug addict or a thief, I took the situation as life challenges to educate and shape my life positively. While I saw friends taken over by drugs and some of them immediately going back to Africa, I remained in Rome and fought those life obstacles squarely.

Today, the man who was once sleeping at the central train station in Rome now lives with his wife and children in Europe as European citizens. On immigration issues, I consider my books to be special because they are emotional, inspiring, adventurous and educative.  ‘Overseas Chronicle,’ is a book I will recommend to every reader who loves books in the genre of non-fiction. It’s a  book that captures a reader’s attention to figure it out if the contents really took place or just an exaggeration.

Chronicle

http://www.amazon.com/Overseas-Chronicle-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013SLNWFC

The Future Of Your Wealth

Wealth
No one would deny that wealthy families face new and unique challenges that can make planning for the future more difficult than ever before. A byzantine U.S. tax code, increasingly complex global markets, and a growing cultural disdain for the “wealthy” pose new threats to the American investor. In this clear-sighted and urgent guide to managing your wealth,
        Matthew Shafer calls on his years of advising experience and his background as an economist to chart a new course toward financial success and peace of mind. Shafer outlines how new investment strategies based on cutting-edge analytics and behavioral finance can help you navigate today’s uncertain economic terrain and harness the mass psychology that drives market trends.
         Armed with a resilient outlook and an economist’s insight into the future, Shafer argues that the road ahead is not all doom and gloom-in fact; there are good reasons to be very optimistic about the future of your wealth. In April, Matt and The Future of Your Wealth was featured in the USA Today article, Seven Big Mistakes Couples Make in Retirement.
The Author
Wealth 2
Matt Shafer is a graduate of American University in Washington DC, where he obtained a BA in Economics and an MA in Economics with a concentration in International Financial Markets. In 2005, Matt attended the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkley where he obtained the title of Certified Investment Management Analyst (CIMA®) and joined the Investment Management Consultants Association (IMCA).
        Matt represents the 3rd generation of his family to provide wealth management advice to successful professionals, business owners and investors. He began his Wealth Management career in 1997 and currently leads a team of Financial Advisors based in South Florida, New England and Michigan.
         Matt has been named one of the top 1,000 Financial Advisors in the U.S. by Barron’s Magazine (2009) and has received several national recognitions including “Premier Advisor” by the National Association of Board Certified Advisory Practices (2012). He also writes a wealth management column for Worth Magazine. Matt lives in Boca Raton, Florida with his wife and two children.
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