Tribute To Johan Cruyff: One Of The World’s Greatest Footballers

Cruyff

The good old days of Johan Cruyff in action.

There are thousands of footballers worldwide, but few make history in the field of soccer. Cruyff represented Holland on 48 occasions and scored 33 times for the national side, helping them reach the final at the 1974 World Cup.  

I remember while working at Hotel Okura in Amsterdam, one of my colleagues called Mario, who was a fan of Cruyff, always had the picture of the young days the footballer in his wallet. He removed the picture from his wallet and asked me if I can recognise who he was. “Johan Cruyff, he is my hero too, I said.”

Yes, a great footballer has fans and I ‘m proud to say that I’m one of them. The Dutch legend Johan died peacefully in Barcelona on Thursday after losing his battle with lung cancer.

The former Ajax and Barcelona passed away surrounded by his family after he was initially diagnosed last October. Cruyff is regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time and went on to enjoy huge success as a coach.

We shall greatly miss him. His place no one can fill, because he is one person, Johan Cruyff. His achievement in the field of soccer history shall remain forever.

Cruyff 2Sporting his famous long locks, Cruyff turns out for Ajax in June 1971. On June 2 that year, in London, Ajax won the European Cup by defeating Panathinaikos 2–0. At the end of the season, he became not only the Dutch but also the European Footballer of the Year.

Cruyff 3

Cruyff was a heavy smoker until undergoing major heart surgery in 1991 while manager of Barcelona.

10 Reasons Racism Has Never Been An Issue Of Concern To Me

All we need is love

Love conquers everything, so that’s what we need for a healthy society.

Racism is the belief that a particular race is superior or inferior to another, that a person’s social and moral traits are predetermined by his or her inborn biological characteristics. Racial separatism is the belief, most of the time based on racism, that different races should remain segregated and apart from one another.

This evil ideology or belief has caused bloodshed, unrest, and death in our society and still continue to tear our society apart today. Churches and organizations continue to discourage racism and strengthen relationships without success. In the world of racism, the Black man is the one that suffers most and being discriminated against, yet no one wants to be called a racist. Below are ten reasons I don’t care much about racism, even though I feel sorry for victims of racism.

  1. Racism is a chronic incurable disease, which can’t be cured or eliminated but can be reduced.
  2. Tribalism is a form of racism in Africa, the reason in Nigeria, the Yoruba hates the Ebo.
  3. In Ghana, the Gas hates the Fantes.
  4. In Sierra Leone, the Mende hates the Temni.
  5. In America, African-Americans draw guns at each other, killing and slashing their own brothers’ throat.  Why do they complain about racism, when they hate themselves?
  6. Head of churches and government officials secretly support racism.
  7. In Rwanda, the Hutu hates Tutsi.
  8. The black man has completely lost his identity through slavery. That identity can never be recovered.
  9. Many African-Americans have neglected Africa and even hate to be referred to as Africans. Being proud of where they came from and showing love, will give them the love and respect they deserve. Above all, there are black racists too.
  10. Children are not born racists. Adults continue to teach them at home and in schools, so racism will never come to an end.

Taking the above reasons into consideration, it is a total waste of time to spend hours worrying about racism or an incurable disease. I think this is the reason Sebb Blatter said, racism in football should be ignored and settled with a handshake.

I Stand Accused: But I’m Innocent

Worry 1

Photo credit: musedmagonline.com

I am not a professional psychologist, trained to conduct research, perform and evaluate the emotional and psychological challenges of individuals. I am writing this article due to my personal experience and what I’ve seen in families, individuals, groups, and society as a whole.

When we were young, we did many things which we never thought were bad. We were in the ages of no regret, so we feel good and great over our bad attitudes and the wrong things we were doing, thinking that make us great to stand out of the crowd. We only realized the many sins we committed during our early twenties or adulthood.

We can’t turn back the clock after knowing the bad things we did, than regret or repent to lead a better and responsible life in adulthood. Unfortunately, many live the same life from youth till the end of their lives. At school, we feel very proud to say that “I’ve a girlfriend,” even though many of us are scared to talk to girls.

One day while school on vacation, we organized a small party in one of my friend’s house. We invited the girls we like best claiming to be our girlfriends, yet we couldn’t even look into their eyes in a second. My best friend Aldo, invited his platonic girlfriend and I invited mine.

I told Aldo to come an hour after me, in order to enjoy my privacy with Emmy. In fact, that was the first time I tasted the lips of a beautiful girl I loved most during my school days. I felt I was in paradise, after the kiss I realized I’m still on earth. At nineteen, I consider myself too young to enter into bed with Emmy as students. I was therefore satisfied with the kiss she gave me, so I left with her to join the public transport home.

When I came back, I saw Aldo with Aggie, a very dark beautiful complexion girl everyone is proud of. I told Aldo, “I finished with Emmy and she has gone home.” I think Aldo misunderstood what I said. His mind went on different thing. Why I’m saying this? What ensued after was clear enough to know that Aldo misunderstood me.

People in our neighbourhood heard unusual event taking place in the room where Aldo and Aggie were. The struggle became so intense that I quickly went to the place to find out what is going on between them. As soon as I opened the door, Aggie with fury bolted out and all attempts to find out what went wrong were futile. Aggie left with anger without looking back.

I questioned Aldo over Aggie’s temperance, and he confessed that he had wanted to have sex with her but everything went wrong. I asked him, what’s the reason of forcing a girl who doesn’t want to have sex with you?  “You told me you’ve finished with Emmy, the reason; I tried to have sex with her.” I was shocked over the answer Aldo gave me.

“But Aldo, saying that I’ve finished with Emmy doesn’t mean I had sex with her.” I said with emotions, desperately trying to defend myself. Instead of Aldo acknowledging his own mistakes, to apologize to Aggie, he put the blame on me, ruining our friendship without further communication between us, until the time both completed our secondary education.

This scenario took place years ago, when we were teenagers, but it still hurts me. Why should Aldo take my answer to enhance his own selfish desire, when that wasn’t what I mean? After school, I tried to renew our friendship but it seems, Aldo still habours the feeling that I crashed his world. He decides not to have anything with me.

There is no need to cry over spilt milk. I gave up. Years after school, without any knowledge about the welfare of Aldo , I met a classmate who told me of the death of my friend. He had a fractured leg during a football match. The extent of his injury was so severe that he succumbed.

I miss him very much, but I have a clear conscience that my statement didn’t mean that I slept with Emmy, so he shouldn’t have tried to sleep with Aggie, above all, he failed to ask me the meaning of what I said, before embarking on a wrong journey. Whatever the situation, I pray for him to have a peaceful rest, knowing that we shall meet again somewhere in heaven or the universe one day, if truly there life after death.

Until Friday Night

Night

The first novel in a brand-new series—from New York Times and USA TODAY bestselling author Abbi Glines—about a small Southern town filled with cute boys in pickup trucks, Friday night football games, and crazy parties that stir up some major drama.

To everyone who knows him, West Ashby has always been that guy: the cocky, popular, way-too-handsome-for-his-own-good football god who led Lawton High to the state championships. But while West may be Big Man on Campus on the outside, on the inside he’s battling the grief that comes with watching his father slowly die of cancer.

Two years ago, Maggie Carleton’s life fell apart when her father murdered her mother. And after she told the police what happened, she stopped speaking and hasn’t spoken since. Even the move to Lawton, Alabama, couldn’t draw Maggie back out. So she stayed quiet, keeping her sorrow and her fractured heart hidden away.

As West’s pain becomes too much to handle, he knows he needs to talk to someone about his father—so in the dark shadows of a post-game party, he opens up to the one girl who he knows won’t tell anyone else.

West expected that talking about his dad would bring some relief, or at least a flood of emotions he couldn’t control. But he never expected the quiet new girl to reply, to reveal a pain even deeper than his own—or for them to form a connection so strong that he couldn’t ever let her go…

The Author

Abbi

Abbi Glines is a #1 New York Times, USA Today, andWall Street Journal bestselling author of the Rosemary Beach, Sea Breeze, Vincent Boys, and Existence series. She has a new YA series coming out in the fall of 2015 titled The Field Party Series . She never cooks unless baking during the Christmas holiday counts.

She believes in ghosts and has a habit of asking people if their house is haunted before she goes in it. She drinks afternoon tea because she wants to be British but alas she was born in Alabama. When asked how many books she has written she has to stop and count on her fingers.

When she’s not locked away writing, she is reading, shopping (major shoe and purse addiction), sneaking off to the movies alone, and listening to the drama in her teenagers lives while making mental notes on the good stuff to use later. Don’t judge.

You can connect with Abbi online in several different ways. She uses social media to procrastinate.

Facebook: AbbiGlinesAuthor
Website: AbbiGlines.com
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http://www.amazon.com/Until-Friday-Night-Field-Party/dp/1481438859/