J.N.K. Savage:Tracing The Works Of A Great Journalist Behind Computer Age

SAV 6Journalist/Documentary film Producer and Director Justin N.K. Savage and wife Nancy-Elizabeth Savage (Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson) You looking at my mother and father.

Justin Nobleman Kodwo Savage was a professional journalist, documentary film producer and director, born at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana in 1932. While in active service, he passed away on January 29, 1976.

At Guinea Press, now ‘The Ghanaian Times’ during the Kwame Nkrumah era, Mr. Savage travelled extensively across the globe, whenever the president leaves the country to participate in world affairs.

At home, Ghanaians were able to receive first-hand information from Mr. Savage, over Nkrumah’s trip overseas, appearing in ‘The Evening News,’ newspaper dominated by party news, CPP, and adulation of Nkrumah.

At Guinea Press, Justin Savage had the opportunity to make further studies in journalism in London, England, but Nkrumah’s interest in communism took him off Ghana soil to many Eastern European countries including Poland, Czechoslovakia etc, and Russia.

In the sixties, the president of the then Czechoslovakia invited African journalists to his country. Justin Savage heads the African journalists from Ghana, but the Ghanaians presence stole the show, because of the native Kente cloth they put on. Kente exposes the rich tradition and culture of Ghana.

Justin Savage filed his press cuts and combined all his publications which appeared in the newspapers as a magazine, naming it “A Mixture Of Periodicals.” These publications later after his death, became my favourite book, assisting me to gain more writing skills when my interest increased to be a writer.

Darkness fell on Ghana when Nkrumah was overthrown-ed on February 24, 1966, in a coup organized by CIA and local collaborators. Chaos and curfews followed amidst jubilation and sadness. Mr. Savage served Guinea press a year more and he resigned.

He followed a course in technology at the Kumasi Science and Technology, where he studied film production. After his course, he entered into Ghana Broadcasting Corporation as ‘Advisor on film for television.’

He excelled in his profession and had promotions. It wasn’t long when Friedrich Ebert Foundation (West German Television Team) established a television project attached to the Broadcasting House in Ghana.

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung is a German political foundation named after Friedrich Ebert, Germany’s first democratically elected president. Headquartered in Bonn and Berlin, the foundation contributes to social democracy by means of:

Political education in order to reinforce its fundamental values, research and scientific analysis of central policy areas, various forms of public dialogue in order to pave the way for it, scholarship programs for students and Ph.D. candidates, development cooperation aimed at global justice and building bridges of international cooperation for worldwide democracy.

For efficient service and to be familiar with new developments in television production, Mr. Savage was at West German for an intensive course. He returned to the Broadcasting House and was appointed ‘Documentary Film Producer and Director.

At the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, he made a number of documentary films, especially during the exhibition of Ghana and other African products at both the first and second ‘Ghana International Trade Fair,’ in Accra.

Kodwo, the name his co-workers loved to call him, did a number of documentary films, including ‘Ghana At A Glance, Cocoa In Ghana, Backyard Industries and ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced in 1972. I had the opportunity to play a role in ‘Backyard Industries.’

I grew up to see some of his friends such as Mr. Kofi Badu, the Managing Director of Daily Graphic and Mr. Willie Donkor, the Editor of Weekly Spectator, still in the media. In the early nineties, January, I contacted one of my father’s friends called Mr. Ebo Biney, at the Broadcasting House, requesting if he could telecast one of my father’s film on January 29, for remembrance. It came as a shock to me when I learned that all my father’s films got burnt, following a fire which engulfed Ghana Broadcasting Corporation some time ago.

Since then I have been working very hard to see if I can find any of my father’s work online, despite far behind computer age or advanced modern technology. Like winning a lotto, I discovered two. The first is at the website of Len Pole, a Museum Consultant: “Advisor on a film for television, ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced by Kodwo Savage, Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.” – http://www.lenpole.com/I contacted the museum consultant after the discovery of my father’s work on his website. I was delighted when he told a few years ago ‘Furnace in a village’ was shown at Cannes Film Festival.

Then I had a new break through  when I discovered another work at: Selected Bibliography in Communication – jstor by Graham B. Kerr, under the topic- All African governments are committed to development and most wish to …Journalism Quarterly [forthcoming]. ….. SAVAGEJ.N.K. “Ghana Jugend begeistert.- . “Ghana inspires youth.”

The selected Bibliography in Communication is a book published by the Canadian Association of African Studies. Justin Savage writes:

“We must bridge the gap between leaders and masses, between government and people . . No government tells the people everything, but every government must reach the people so as to tell them what they should be told” – Julius Nyerere

Continue reading: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/483601.pdf?

The search for my father’s work isn’t yet over. As time goes on when I discover something new, I will keep on updating this article. I hope readers will enjoy reading it and if any reader has any suggestion to improve it, you are always welcome.

The incredible story of this great writer neglected when he was a child is now available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Writer-Died-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L54A7O

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My Name Is Savage, But I am Not Savage

Big Joe 5“Whatever happens to me benefits me.” – Joel Savage

Why many do ask me if ‘Savage’ is my real name? Once a British woman told me she hates her name ‘Mrs Ball’ and worst of all, my father’s name is ‘Mr. Underworld,’  she said. Yes, many of us have strange names. Some do change and others keep them.

I was born Joel Savage, at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana, on January 19, 1957, to Justin Savage, a professional journalist and Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson, an accomplished seamstress and a sewing teacher.

Last year, during my summer holidays in Barcelona, Spain, I gave one of my books to a student I met at the hotel I lodged. At the computer hall, I was flabbergasted when I saw his friends laughing at my name. I pretended I wasn’t listening to their conversation.

Then on January 1, 2016, history repeats itself. At the Kotoka International Airport in Accra, Ghana, when ready to board my flight, an officer at the last checkpoint controlled my passport and the only question he threw at me is: How do you pronounce this word? Pointing directly to the name, “Savage,” I answered.

“Well, I’m glad that you mentioned it yourself, because I thought that may provoke you if I had said the same thing.” He said and gave back my passport to me.

If names have impact on people, then I am exceptional. I am happily married since 1993 and still live with the same woman. If I’m savage, uncivilized, cruel or a beast, my wife wouldn’t have been with me today. My three sons can stand behind me and tell everyone how caring and compassionate their father is.

What I know about myself is, I have intrepid sort of character. I don’t give up and no one can break me down physically, psychologically, emotionally or spiritually. In my life, I take any misfortune as beneficial and every problem as a challenge, because you can’t survive in this world if you submit to problems.

This is the reason many people are depressed, alcoholics or drug addicts. Because they don’t have the will power to fight and overcome those destructive tendencies. Savage is just a name but it has no influence on me. I believe in God and the Bible is my shield and Armour.

The Controversy Surrounding Child Adoption By Homosexuals

Two men can't make a baby so they don't need a child

Gay Child adoption must be considered as a crime because innocent children get lost in the wilderness through ‘Gay-Child’ adoption.

Two men adopted a child. At home, they introduced themselves to the innocent child as their new parents. “Every child has a father and mother, where is my mother if you are my new parents?” The child asked. The homosexuals looked at each other’s face and scratched their heads and said to the small child, “We are just two men to take care of you.” That’s where the psychological turmoil of a child begins.

He has immediately realized that he has nothing called happiness in his world. Firstly, he has lost his real parents because of drug and alcohol issues, now he under the care of two fearful men, telling him we are your new parents. As young as he is the child realizes his future is bleak and uncertain. The men gave him assurance that he is going to be a happy child.

No matter how two men take care of a child, it will never be the same like a child growing with a man and woman. Some people are selfish, greedy, wicked and unfaithful. Sins of the flesh, uncontrollable evil desires, and bad habits prevent people to do the right thing even though they know perfectly well that what they are doing is wrong.

You choose to be gay because you are not interested in a woman, why then interested in a child, when two men can’t make a baby? Society is in decay, facing the threat of collapse, yet if one speaks about it, including homosexuality, he immediately becomes an enemy. Black people have endured and continue to endure the effects of slavery, racism, discrimination and medical crimes.

The world witnessed the killing of over 10 million Africans, including children, by a crazy Belgian king, called Leopold II, in Congo, yet Belgium built statues  and named streets after him. No one criticized Belgium for doing that. But Europe and America are against Africa, for saying “No We Don’t Want Homosexuality.” Stinking hypocrites. Do people think Africans are stupid? Not at all, Africans don’t feel stupid.

No African leader tells European and American leaders what to do, so America and Europe shouldn’t force Africa to accept homosexuality.  We simply don’t want it, but I’m strongly against the way some of the leaders are dealing with homosexual issues in Africa. Many Africans have suffered persecution and killings for just being gay. That’s inhuman.

Even though there are thousands of orphans and children from drug abused homes, governments shouldn’t decide that the only way to help these children is to allow homosexuals to adopt them. It’s a wrong decision. A real happy child runs to the bedroom of his mother and father every morning, not the bedroom of two mustaches.

I don’t hate homosexuals, but I don’t agree with them when it comes to child adoption. They force a child to smile and think the child is happy. We need to create a better world for the benefit of the future generation including children. Every intelligent person that cares about the future should rise on his feet, to tell the world “Homosexuals must stop adopting children.”

When Will I See You Pippi Longstocking?

Pippi 8

Images of the beautiful chapters of Pippi Longstocking’s life

One of the favourite children’s program channeled worldwide under different languages is Inger Nilsson, alias Pippi Longstocking. The cute little redheaded girl from Sweden, moves into her father’s cottage Villa Villekula, and meets her next door neighbours Tommy and Annika.

The face of wonderful little Pippi, is still shown all over the world, but one will be surprise to see the beautiful chapters of Pippi’s life, as she grows from little naughty girl to a real lady and then to her ripe age.

As an adult, I love watching Pippi too wuth the children. She has a wonderful horse, mouse and monkey, but what I like most about her, is her pointed rough old shoes. The above photographs are some of Pippi’s from a young girl to adulthood.

She is still beautiful, do you agree with me? If I get the opportunity one day, I would love to visit her to get a portion of her magic wand, to lift up heavy objects, since she could lift up a whole horse. 

A Crab Doesn’t Beget A Bird: Intriguing African Proverb

Crab

A crab and a bird: photo credit: Alan Murphy

Proverbs are full of wisdom. It’s part of the lives of Africans, as they are used daily. Proverbs educate, warns, and reminds everyone in whatever we do. There are thousands of proverbs in Africa. For example, these are few Ghanaian proverbs.

  • A calf that is sucking does not bellow.
  • 2. A child does not laugh at the ugliness of his mother.
  • 3. A child who is to be successful is not reared exclusively on a bed of down.
  • 4. A crab does not beget a bird.
  • 5. A cracked bell can never sound well.
  • 6. A healthy person who begs for food is an insult to a generous farmer.
  • 7. A knife does not know who is its master.
  • 8. A powerful deity is the one to whom sacrifices are offered.
  • 9. A slave does not choose his master.
  • 10. A stranger dances – he does not sing.

But I like the proverb ” A Crab doesn’t beget a bird.” This proverb is somehow translated or means “Like father like son, or like mother like daughter.”Children look at what their parents do. If a father loves and plays with a gun, he could follow his passion to commit murder.

Along the line, it happens that his son has also inherits the passion of his father, and becomes a gun lover, leading him to commit murder like his father. That’s where the proverb ‘A crab doesn’t beget a bird’ comes in. Yes! Just like the father, he has also committed murder.

Call Me Now Grandpa Joel Savage

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My first grandchild: Anthony Savage

As a father, I realized very early that it is not only getting the best job, house, car etc; makes one happy or successful in life, but to get married and settle. Many acknowledge marriage as a form of trap, unity without comfort or freedom. I don’t see it that way. I see marriage as a bond of life-long commitment and sharing responsibilities, which enhance the success of both partners.

I know perfectly well what my wife has done for me in times of difficulty, uncertainty and when sick. Like Florence Nightingale, she takes care of me and does what I haven’t even requested her to do. I have really enjoyed a happy successful marriage over two decades, because both respect and trust ourselves.

Thus; when my elder son said to me “Daddy I will be getting married soon, I was engulfed with joy, knowing that he has made a good decision, a decision which will keep him sincere, upright and responsible. I witnessed the day of their wedding with emotions, happiness and tears of joy. The two were joined as man and wife, as they exchanged vows and kissed each other.

Jesse. 2

My elder son and wife.

However, my life changed dramatically six weeks ago, when my first grandchild was delivered. I am very happy indeed. I give thanks and praises to God, who makes things possible.  I wish my son and his wife a happy successful marriage. My advice to them is to respect, love and trust each other and to solve every problem they faced amicably. That’s the essence and qualities that lead to a successful marriage.

Do You Ever Dream Of Playing A Role In A Movie?

film 2We all enjoy watching exciting movies and our favorite film stars, to lively up ourselves, as a source of entertainment, after an exhausting day from work or to create a happy union with families, especially at weekends.

We learn a lot from the movies we watch, as they play with our emotions. Sometimes we do cry, get frightened or laugh on the top of our hearts on some films, since some of the films are very hilarious.

As we enjoy watching films or entertain ourselves, have you ever wished or considered to play a role in a film or be an actor? Days back in the early seventies, there was a columnist, “Nana Ama advices you,” in one of the leading Ghanaian newspapers.

That could be the first time I read my letter in a newspaper, when Nana Ama gave me the advice of how to become a successful film actor, after I enquired from her what steps to take to become a film actor.

I watched my favorite television films, ‘Bonanza, The Mod Squad, High Chaparral, Cisco and Pancho, The Sea Way, The Saint, Department S, The Sea Way, The Persuaders etc, without the opportunity to reach Hollywood.

However, one day my dreams were fulfilled locally, when my father, a journalist and a documentary film producer and director,working at the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, offered me roles in two of his films, ‘Cocoa in Ghana and Backyard Industries,’ in the seventies. I was very happy indeed.

I believe that everyone has a talent or born with a talent. Some discover that talent early and others late. Unfortunately, some of these dreams can never be a reality, because there is no means, especially when you are born without a silver spoon in the mouth. But we can always contribute to shape the life and pattern of people positively in the society. I am therefore happy to be a writer.

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