Culture: White People Learning What It Takes To Be An African

 

Africa

Did curiosity really kill the cat? Why so many white people now interested in the diversity of culture, leading them to Africa, the continent the Western and American media never write anything good about, than Aids, Ebola, war, famine, and crime?

The media plays an important role in the society; unfortunately many don’t see it in that way, because of the type of news they disseminate to the public. I was quite impressed and amazed when I met a white man telling me about his visit to Sierra Leone and Ghana. The fact that he could even speak some of the languages inspired me to find out his reasons for leaving his continent of luxury, to a strange hard living continent like Africa.

“If a white man comes to live in Africa for six months or a year, the Western media hails him  brave and adventurous, with publication appearing in the newspapers, but the same places I visited are where Africans have lived from generation to generation but the media fails to praise them on the same issue,” said the white man. He is right. There is crime everywhere in the world, especially Italy, Britain, Columbia, Brazil, and America, but the media has made South Africa the most dangerous country on earth.

Every year thousands of Europeans travel to Africa, just because they want to know how Africans live, despite the lack of electricity in many villages, medical facilities, water shortage and poor sanitation. It is amazing to see many white people on African streets, with families interacting and learning many things including how to make African meals. Surprisingly some participate in cultural and festival activities dressed in African fashions, especially in Kente cloth.

Despite the lack of teachers and poor educational facilities, an African child can be able to tell one geographically, the capital city of every country in the world, yet ask a white child of the same age, the capital city of Ghana, Sierra Leone, South Africa or any African country. He will tell you “I don’t know,” with quick remarks “Africa is poor,” because that’s all that his geography teacher has taught him.

I am hundred percent sure that if African and European children meet in a quiz competition, the African children would win because they know much about Europe and America than what European and American children know about Africa. This is not an exaggeration but facts based on research I did. Imagine an African student of fourteen in a Belgium school, who doesn’t even know who Patrice Lumumba was, even though her parents come from Congo. This is a tragedy, not sadness. I didn’t blame her because teachers have failed to teach European students enough about Africa.

I wish exchange of program in education and on moral issues, would take some European children to Africa, to learn the reason why despite immense poverty in many parts of Africa, students don’t smoke, commit suicide, no teenage pregnancy, no shooting, stabbing and above all the reason why respect exists in African schools than any school in Europe and America.

________________________________________

Advertisements

Under The Same Sky: From Starvation North Korea To Salvation In America

Kim 4

A searing story of starvation and survival in North Korea, followed by a dramatic escape, rescue by activists and Christian missionaries, and success in the United States thanks to newfound faith and courage

Inside the hidden and mysterious world of North Korea, Joseph Kim lived a young boy’s normal life until he was five. Then disaster struck: the first wave of the Great Famine, a long, terrible ordeal that killed millions, including his father, and sent others, like his mother and only sister, on desperate escape routes into China. Alone on the streets, Joseph learned to beg and steal. He had nothing but a street-hardened survival instinct. Finally, in desperation, he too crossed a frozen river to escape to China.

There a kindly Christian woman took him in, kept him hidden from the authorities, and gave him hope. Soon, through an underground network of activists, he was spirited to the American consulate, and became one of just a handful of North Koreans to be brought to the U.S. as refugees. Joseph knew no English and had never been a good student. Yet the kindness of his foster family changed his life.

He turned a new leaf, became a dedicated student, mastered English, and made it to college, where he is now thriving thanks to his faith and inner strength. Under the Same Sky is an unforgettable story of suffering and redemption.

The Author

Kim 3

Joseph Kim

Few can imagine what it is like to be homeless and starving as a child. Few can imagine life in the hermit kingdom of North Korea. However, refugee Joseph Kim knows both very well and he gives us a window into those worlds in his new memoir Under the Same Sky: From Starvation in North Korea to Salvation in America.

Kim became homeless during the great famine of the 1990s, which killed more than a million people including his father. After three years on the streets, he escaped to China where a network of activists connected him with the U.S. consulate. At 17 years old, Kim arrived in America as a refugee with no family and barely an education.

NPR’s Arun Rath spoke with Kim about his harrowing experience as a homeless kid on the streets of North Korea, and how he finally made it to America.

On his life before the famine

I was only 4 or 5 years old when the famine began so I can’t really remember much from before but what I can remember is that I was actually being able to play with my friends, everything was peaceful. I didn’t have to worry about when the next meal was gonna come or whether we are gonna have food or not.

On losing his family at 12 years old

So my mom actually ended up making a very difficult decision to sell my older sister to Chinese men. She came back to me in North Korea and she explained to me but I didn’t really understand at the time. But now I think about it and she did it so she could at least save her youngest child, which was me. After that my mom tried to go to China again to look for my sister and earn some money but she got caught so she was put in a prison facility.

On being homeless in North Korea

In order to survive as a homeless, probably one of the first things that you have to do is to give up your human dignity because if you try to keep yourself a human being and try to preserve your rights and right to be treated, you’re not going to be able to ask for food. I mean it’s really humiliating. You also have to cross the line where you have to stop worrying about or thinking about the morality. I was taught in school don’t steal it but if I don’t steal it, I can’t survive.

On escaping to China

I crossed where the river was frozen so I was able to run across the border. There was no security guard. [The] distance was not that long, maybe like 100 yards, but I feel like that was the fastest I ran in my life.

On being a refugee in America

Friends treat me as just a normal Korean-American student — although they know my stories, I think my friends allow me to be part of their group without labeling me as a North Korean defector. I feel definitely welcomed and accepted.