GREAT NIGERIA IS NOW A BROKEN GLASS NO ONE CAN MEND

Lagos 4#Traffic congestion in Lagos is a common thing

Early February 1980, Babatunde left Accra, Ghana, for Lagos, the populated city in the Federal Republic of Nigeria. It was then an era when every young man wanted to go to this oil-rich country. It was like the Exodus, the mass departure of the Israelites from Egypt to the promise land. The oil boom had improved the economy, giving rise to employment in every field.

At one time, Nigeria is the largest exporter of groundnuts, cocoa, and palm oil. Petroleum plays a large role in Nigeria’s economy. It is the twelfth largest producer of petroleum in the world, accounting for 40 percent of Gross Domestic Product and 80 percent of government earnings.

Babatunde found himself a place to stay at Surulere, a suburb of Lagos, through the help of a relative living in Nigeria over four decades. Lagos is one of the most populated cities in the world. Looking for accommodation was just as hard and tedious as excavating te ground for gold. The city was very beautiful despite its filth. Lagos Island is surrounded by a vast body of water. It has the largest seaport, especially the Tin- Can port, then also Apapa.

The numerous overhead bridges connecting the whole city exposed the beauty of the country. For example, the Third Mainland Bridge right from Ebute-Metta to Obalende, both suburbs of Lagos, was a well-done job by the German firm, Julius Berger. In the city, wriggling through the crowded afternoon shoppers was what the pickpockets liked most.

The city was very beautiful at night; unfortunately, poor drainage system made life unbearable for its inhabitants when it rained. It was very common to see a single room occupied by seven or more people. Babatunde shared a room with four other men who had been in the country for a very long time. The four were working at the same place, the Apapa port.

Nigeria was a country with regard to foreigners, each one for himself and God for everyone. Don’t expect to be fed when luckily you have got someone to accommodate you, so most of the time Babatunde used to go out with them when they were not working. Thus, within a short period of his arrival, he had already become familiar with the neighbouring suburbs, such as Yaba, Orile, Ebute Metta, Eko, Ikeja, Edu-Motta, Palm Grove, and a host of other places.

Nigeria was at its peak and probably could be one of the richest countries in the world, with various jobs available in all fields. The economy was too good and the poor could afford everything like the rich with a bread worth 10 Kobo on the table. The exchange of the dollar was somewhere between 45 to 65 Kobo. A ticket of four hundred Naira could provide your round trip to Europe and back.

Around the music shops, the competition between musicians Sunny Ade and Ebenezer was heavy, as the fans of King Sunny Ade and Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey fight to establish supremacy.  I (Babatunde) got a job as a driver to a politician, which paved the way for me to drive the late Chief Obafemi Awolowo through the principal streets of Calabar when the Unity Party of Nigeria was having a campaign in Calabar.

I met great people including Chief Ebenezer Babatope, UPN Publicity Secretary. Meeting Chief Obefemi Awolowo, the leader of Unity Party of Nigeria was a great experience. With him and chief Essuene behind me, I wouldn’t like to listen to their conversation, so I increased the volume of my reggae music. But Awololo told me to bring down the volume and I did. I travelled extensively throughout the states of Nigeria. Just guess, if your boss has nine cars including Volvo, Mercedes-Benz, Toyota SuperSaloon etc.

Nobody ever thought such a great country could fall on its knees beyond recovery. Like a broken glass which can’t be mend, Nigeria at the moment is beyond recovery. Poor governance and corruption have crippled the economy of the  country to the extent that the common man lives with hopes and dreams. I don’t know any head of state who has a magic wand to pull this country which was once better than many European countries out of this economy storm.

Extract from the book Road Of Agony

Paint 8

:  http://www.amazon.com/Road-Agony-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L99T44/

http://www.amazon.com/Joel-Savage/e/B008SCTYI6/

Exodus Politics: Civil Rights and Leadership in African American Literature and Culture (American Literatures Initiative

Exodus

Using the term “exodus politics” to theorize the valorization of black male leadership in the movement for civil rights, Robert J. Patterson explores the ways in which the political strategies and ideologies of this movement paradoxically undermined the collective enfranchisement of black people. He argues that by narrowly conceptualizing civil rights in only racial terms and relying solely on a male figure, conventional African American leadership, though frequently redemptive, can also erode the very goals of civil rights.

The author turns to contemporary African American writers such as Ernest Gaines, Gayl Jones, Alice Walker, and Charles Johnson to show how they challenge the dominant models of civil rights leadership.

He draws on a variety of disciplines―including black feminism, civil rights history, cultural studies, and liberation theology―in order to develop a more nuanced formulation of black subjectivity and politics.

Patterson’s connection of the concept of racial rights to gender and sexual rights allows him to illuminate the literature’s promotion of more expansive models. By considering the competing and varied political interests of black communities, these writers reimagine the dominant models in a way that can empower communities to be self-sustaining in the absence of a messianic male leader.

The Author

John

Dr. Patterson is an Associate Professor of English and African American Studies, and Director of the African American Studies Program at Georgetown University. His book, Exodus Politics: Civil Rights and Leadership African American Literature and Culture (UVA Press, 2013), argues that African American literature written after the civil rights movement challenges society’s tendencies to think of civil rights solely in terms of race, to deem black male leadership as necessary for civil rights attainment, and to contain the scope of the civil rights movement to the fifteen year period between 1963-1968.

In addition to this project, Dr. Patterson has published articles on W.E.B. Dubois, Toni Morrison, African American Women’s Writing,Tyler Perry’s films. Some of his work appears in South Atlantic Quarterly Black Camera, Religion and Literature, the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and the Cambridge Companion to Civil Rights Literature. He co-guest edited a special edition of South Atlantic Quarterly, Black Literature, Black Leadership (112.2).

Extending his interest scholarly interests in the post-civil rights era, black popular culture, and the politics of gender, he also has begun to work on a second book project, Destructive Desires: Black Popular Culture and the Intimacy of Politics, which analyzes the various ways that African Americans used popular and expressive culture to negotiate racial politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. He is also co-editing a book, The Psychic Hold of Slavery, which is an interdisciplinary collection of scholarly essays that considers why and how slavery still matters.

http://www.amazon.com/Exodus-Politics-Leadership-Literature-Literatures/dp/0813935261

 

Did Jesus Christ Really Die On The Cross?

On Easter Sunday, Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. According to Scriptures, Jesus  resurrected from the dead, three days after his death on the cross. The story of the coming of the Messiah to earth is genuine, as prophesied years ago, by some prophets, but did the Saviour really died on the cross?

Cross

Even though the cross is loved and respected by thousands of Christians worldwide, true Christians are far away from the cross and have nothing to do with it. How can that be? One significant reason is Jesus didn’t die on the cross. The Greek translates ‘Cross’ – ‘Stau-ros’. This means that an upright pole or stake. The Companion Bible states that ‘Stau-ros’ never means two pieces of wood or timber placed across one another at any angle.

Hermann Fulda’s book ‘The Cross and the Crucifixion’ states that Trees weren’t available everywhere at the public places chosen for execution, so a single beam was sunk into the ground. On this beam, outlaws hands are raised and often with the feet are bound or nailed. To confirm the truth that Jesus didn’t die on the cross, the Apostle Paul said:

Christ by purchase released us from the curse of the law, by becoming cursed instead of us, because it is written “Accursed is every man hanged upon a stake (tree-King James Version)” Galatians 3:13. At Deuteronomy 21:22, Paul’s quote clearly refers to a stake, not a cross. Since anyone who dies on a pole, beam, stick, wood, tree etc; is cursed, it wouldn’t be appropriate for Christians or churches to decorate walls or homes with cross symbols.

The New Catholic Encyclopedia admits, the cross is found in both pre-Christian and non-Christian cultures. It was rather linked to pagan sex rites. Above all, the scriptures also warn against all kinds of idolatry. (Exodus 20:4, 5; 1 Corinthians 10:14) With such good reasons, true Christians don’t use the cross in worship.  One of those churches which have nothing to do with the cross is ‘The Jehovah Witness.’