Why I Stopped Writing For Diplomatic Aspects Newspaper

GuidoBelgium’s top scientist Guido van der Groen lied over the origins of Ebola in 2014, after speaking the truth on October 13, 1994, that America invented the virus as bio-weapon.

If a soothsayer or a clairvoyant had told Belgium years back that an African journalist will one day be in Belgium, to expose their crimes, lies and incompetence, I believe they would have said “No way.” 

Why? Because Belgium is a country that has grossly abused Africa medically and physically. They have no regard for the life of an African. The reason they built a statue for a king that killed over ten million Africans, including women and children.

After futile efforts to write for some of the European online newspapers, I had a breakthrough when the editor of Diplomatic Aspects Newspaper, Magdalena Butucea, accepted my request to write for the newspaper.

Diplomatic Aspects Newspaper is one of the biggest Europe’s online newspapers publishing the activities of the European Union, International, business, human rights and diplomatic news. The editor is very open, flexible and nice person to work with but something went wrong later.

Johan Van Dongen, the Dutch microsurgeon who lost his job when he was a lecturer at the university of Maastricht in Holland, for revealing that Aids and Ebola were man-made diseases by America to depopulate Africa, contacted me over the lies Guido van der Groene, one of the Belgians top scientists, made over the origins of Aids and Ebola.

On October 13, 1994, in an interview with Humo, one of Belgium’s news magazines, Belgium’s professor Guido van der Groen said  “The U.S. military laboratories slated for Ebola and HIV, to develop into a biological weapon in the early sixties. Because he regretted of revealing the truth, Groen now claims that: Ebola was invented in 1960’s in Fort Detrick and in Congo.

I quickly prepared an article pertaining this issue, since it has been the biggest task for world leaders, including World Health Organization and Center for Diseases Control to cover up those medical crimes against Africa, which unfortunately Aids has now become a global health problem.

The article captioned “Holland’s Professor Johan Van Dongen Challenges Belgium’s Scientist Guido van der Groen over the origins of Ebola, was submitted to the editor of Diplomatic Aspects Newspaper and it was published. Unknowing after the publication, Belgium fears of reprisal and exposure, secretly contacted the editor without my knowledge to remove the article from the web.

I wasn’t aware that such crime, another incompetence of the Belgian government has taken place eluding my attention. It was on LinkedIn’s social platform, an American reader contacted me that the article has been removed from the web. When I contacted the editor, she wouldn’t like to comment on it.

It’s her newspaper, so she can do whatever pleases her, but I am a man of truth and would always walk and work with people that follow the truth. The reason I stopped writing for the newspaper. At the moment, I am working with Johan van Dongen, who has also suffered a great deal like me for pursuing truth. We shall overcome one day because the light is powerful than darkness.

The Incompetent Belgian Government Responsible For Terrorist Attacks

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BY

As the world sends its sympathy to the victims of the recent terror attacks in Brussels, the most fervent prayer to be uttered for Belgium itself is that it finally wakes up. The incompetent Belgian government, its bureaucratic law enforcement agencies and its half-hearted intelligence services deserve as much blame for the slaughter as the murderers.

For more than a decade, the bumblers in Belgium have stood by as terrorist hotbeds emerged in their midst. Speaking to Newsweek on condition of anonymity, frustrated intelligence officers in other European countries slammed the Belgians, saying that they have failed to do the basic legwork to detect terrorist cells in neighborhoods around Brussels, with their efforts instead focused on groups that all but announce themselves, such as Sharia4Belgium, whose leaders were prosecuted last year. Belgian law enforcement has few contacts or informants in the areas around Brussels where terrorists live. Only in the last few months has Belgium started pumping greater funding to intelligence efforts and to recruiting more personnel.

Belgium’s lackadaisical approach to Islamic terrorist cells has placed much of the continent in danger, which is why government officials from the European Union and the United States have been quietly pressing its leaders to shape up, intelligence officials say. The terrorists who have set up shop in Brussels are only a short drive from Paris, Strasbourg, Amsterdam, Berlin, Cologne, Frankfurt and Berlin.

Few in the intelligence community were surprised to discover that the November terrorist attacks in Paris were organized in Belgium, led by a Belgian named Abdelhamid Abaaoud, and included a suicide bomber and shooter from Belgium. That attack was the deadliest in the European Union since the 2004 Madrid train bombings, whose perpetrators included Belgians in a terrorist cell that was part of the Groupe Islamique Marocain Combattant.

Read more: http://europe.newsweek.com/isis-brussels-belgium-bureaucrats-terrorism-islamic-state-europe-paris-440658?

 

The Cost Of Terror In Brussels

Brussels 5Brussels, the heart of Belgium’s capital in the night

Article originally published in Global Risks Insight: Know Your World

Brussels, the capital of Belgium and the European Union, is experiencing some immediate economic effects resulting from recent terror threats in 2015. This city’s experience may prove to be a blueprint for other cities in 2016.

Following the deadly terrorist attacks that shocked France and the world on November 13th 2015, the global attention turned to Brussels as the majority of the Islamist militants that took part in the French massacre had links to the European capital. In addition, in late November Belgian authorities temporarily raised the terrorist threat level to its highest tier given the presence of a reportedly imminent terrorist threat.

This led to substantial disruptions in the capital in what came to be defined as “Brussels Lockdown”. The terrorist threat again came as an obstacle to the normal life of Brussels’ residents when authorities banned all public New Year’s Eve festivities on December 31st because of a reported plan to carry out an attack in the capital.

This prolonged state of insecurity has had a negative impact on the economic and social life of the capital. Since November 2015, Brussels, along with other European capitals, has been experiencing first-hand the cost of terror. The most overt statistics pertaining to touristic activities, social outings, and public gatherings show a general change in the perception of the city and an overall evolution in the local mood.

Throughout the duration of the “Brussels Lockdown”, thousands of travellers planning to reach the capital cancelled their flights. At the highest point of this trend, more than 2,000 flight cancellations were recorded on November 25th. While this push to avoid Brussels slowly stopped after the terrorist threat level was lowered, there were in average 6,000 flights per day to Brussels in early December 2015, approximately 1,500 less than in the same period of 2014.

A similar trend has been verified for the overall occupation rate of hotels in the capital. In early December, approximately 55% of Brussels’ hotel rooms were occupied against more than 73% during the same period of 2014.

Ubiquitous precautions

This situation had a direct impact on the economic and social life of the European capital throughout the Christmas and New Year’s festivities. The annual Christmas market organised and held in the historical centre of Brussels has experienced a drop in attendance of more than 30%. In addition, New Year’s Eve saw a major drop in demand for restaurant bookings and, as such, at least one out of every two restaurants in the capital closed their doors on the last night of 2015.

The aforementioned statistics are only an initial effect of the impact that the emergence of a new terror threat is having on western European economies. The Belgian example is noteworthy as local security and intelligence agencies have so far been successful in countering the threat posed by Islamist militants, and no major mass-casualty attack has occurred in the country.

However, the enhanced presence of military personnel in the streets of Brussels as well as the ongoing discourse over the current will of terrorist organisations to target the capital led to a mood change among the local population. The fear of potential attacks is playing as a long-term obstacle to private expenditures, tourism and the participation in major public social events.

As such, beyond the immediate security concerns raised by the risk of terrorist attacks, public officials face the need to adapt the ongoing counter-terrorist strategy in order not to hinder the socio-economic life of western European countries.

http://globalriskinsights.com/2016/01/the-cost-of-terror-in-brussels/

My Motherland Offers Riches To The Tourist, So Why Are So Many Ghanaians Queuing Up To Come To Britain?

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Ghana Says ‘Awaaba’- Welcome

A tale of two countries

Article by Henry Bonsu: A journalist and broadcaster (Originally published in TheGuardian)

While my primary government, in London, has been struggling to persuade people in Britain it has done enough to keep out the huddled masses from eastern Europe, my secondary government, in Accra, has also been preoccupied with travel. But rather than keeping undesirables out, Ghana’s government is more concerned with bringing people in: to spend their pounds, dollars and euros on business and tourism. And Ghanaians living in Britain are being asked to do their bit to help turn their country into Africa’s number one destination.

The tourism minister, Jake Obestebi-Lamptey, wants us to tell people that the former Gold Coast has become a “bird-watcher’s paradise, eco-tourism haven and an adventurer’s dream”. I’ve been wondering, though, how we can persuade the locals that they are sitting on such a goldmine. Stroll past the British high commission in Accra on any given evening and you’ll see Ghanaians bedding down, hoping to be the first in the visa queue the next morning.

And the 35,000 Ghanaians who were granted short-term entry to Britain this year, and the similar number of rejects, are just a fraction of those who dream of fleeing poverty. With doctors, nurses and teachers in the vanguard, ministers have been insisting on loyalty clauses for ambitious graduates. Not for nothing are we called the “Jews of Africa”, with an estimated 200,000 Ghanaians and their descendants settling in this country alone since independence.

Some people are used to thinking of Ghana as a “beacon” country of stability and inward investment – the symbolic destination for African-Caribbeans and Americans who wish to reclaim their heritage. Didn’t the IMF and World Bank lavish praise on former president Jerry Rawlings and his successor John Kufuor for their growth rates of 5%? Haven’t Japan and the EU given Ghana millions of dollars for skills training and poverty reduction?

Indeed they have. But when I visit my motherland this summer, it will, once again, be a tale of two countries. I’ll marvel at the beach hotels, luxury estates and free press, and revel in the power of the pound, which takes me from bohemian Brixton to the elite of Ghanaian society in six hours.

But this is the Ghana of the expatriate, and the rich business and political classes, who travel in and out of Britain, but have no intention of staying because their standard of living cannot be replicated in any European country.

The other Ghana is that of my cousin, a pastor, who ministers in the densely populated areas of Greater Accra. Maamobi is typical; a district of shanty housing, open sewers, malaria and mass unemployment. If you are lucky enough to have a job, your minimum wage has just gone up to 11,000 cedis (65p) a day.

My aunt is a typical resident, full of incredible hospitality, but she talks about her own future with little ambition, investing all hope in the children she’s managed to send abroad. Swatting away flies under the burning sun, she chats about whether things can change in “Mother Ghana”, with frequent references to gye nyame (“only God can help us”).

Perhaps such fatalism is understandable in a 60-year-old, who has witnessed colonial rule followed by decades of strong-man politics. But it is more distressing to see the fight go out of younger people, who can spend years in limbo, waiting for an overseas relative to pay some middle man a £3,000 “connection fee” to ease their passage. Ironically these are the same Ghanaians who, once here, will hold down two or three jobs, and contribute their share of an annual $1.5bn in remittances to sustain their family.

When cousins ask me how life is in Britain, I warn that although the 60s Nkrumah generation – which includes my parents – have largely succeeded in grooming their children for a middle-class future, things are more unpleasant for recent arrivals; that unless they have key qualifications (medical, educational or social work), they will have few choices – hence around 60% of London’s parking attendants are Ghanaian or Nigerian.

Perhaps naively I offer to help them do business locally alongside the mechanics, seamstresses and shopkeepers, who somehow manage to make ends meet, but then I hear of Ghana’s frighteningly high interest and inflation rates, the soaring price of utilities (a consequence of foreign-inspired privatisation), and the stop-go electricity supply. If, like my uncle in Kumasi, you take up farming, which comprises 36% of Ghana’s GDP, could you compete with cheap subsidised goods from the west, without being given access to European and US markets?

Would you wait for change to be delivered by Blair and Geldof’s African Commission? No, in those circumstances, £6 an hour as a security guard or a cleaner in a faraway country may sound like a better way to make money. Perhaps, like the dozens of others who’ll be bedding down outside the British high commission tonight, you’d rehearse your lines in preparation for an interview, and perhaps a passport to life in London’s underbelly. So, if you’re a British traveller huffing at the occasional delay at Heathrow, spare a thought for the other kind of global traffic heading in your direction with tourism the last thing on its mind.

The State Of The European Union And The Impact Of Television On The Society

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Joel Savage interviews Sergi Vicente, the Director of Barcelona Televisio.

Apartheid bowed to democracy in South Africa, the Berlin wall came tumbling down and the Soviet Union collapsed. Globally things were financially, economically and politically falling apart, when the European Union was formally established on November I, 1993, to share free market and single monetary policy for over more than 300 million citizens.

Many Europeans, including Belgians, argue that things were better and life more comfortable, before the European Union was formed. For example, the past and present turmoil in other European countries, including Greece, reveal the European Union is unstable and steering into stormy waters.

My recent visit to Barcelona, I called on Mr. Sergi Vicente, the director of Barcelona Televisio, to give me his views and opinion on the present state of the European Union and the impact of the television on the society. Below are the excerpts of the interview.

Joel: There are thousands of Europeans, especially Western Europe, who aren’t satisfied over the formation of the European Union, because the pattern of lives changed, as prices of commodities escalated, affecting, the economy and the standard living of Europeans, leaving many unemployed. Let’s take Greece for example. What do you think?

Vicente: I don’t see the unification of the European Union as a failure. There are advantages and disadvantages in everything but in regard to the Union, the best has been achieved. Transparency, Communication, integration and the growth of successful free market, are some of the achievements. Besides, the EU has thrived to develop liberty, justice,  education, prosperity, peace, security, the protection of the environment and health, thus; helping to disseminate basic human values at the global level.

Joel: Lack of employment, is a situation many Europeans are facing today. What’s the employment situation in Spain?

Vicente: As you just said, it’s a crisis many Europeans are facing, yet the problem has led to the creation of new jobs in other fields to reduce the unemployment rate. Unemployment may be long or short term, but things will improve.

Joel: Journalism is rapidly losing its credibility, that’s the way many feel, because a lot of the media hide the truth and facts from the public. What’s your opinion?

Vicente: As a journalist heading an institution, we try our best to give the right information to the general public. This is the reason readers and viewers have favourite newspapers or television stations. Being transparent is one of the tools to build a good reputation. So I don’t see the reason the media should mislead people.

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Mr. Sergi Vicente, Director of Barcelona Televisio.

Joel: Barcelona used to be a city for drug addicts and peddlers. Is there any change?

Vicente: You’ve already seen that there is a dramatic change in the city, since the country is one of the most visited tourists attraction in the world. The mayor, police and other officials had worked hard and still relentlessly working hard to make the city  healthy and  safe for tourists.

Joel: Television is a great source of entertainment and education, yet many believe it’s responsible for crime and immorality which have plagued and crippled our society.

Vicente: I can’t say television is responsible for crime, even though I agree that it has both advantages and disadvantages.Children are protected and cared by adults, thus, it’s the responsibility of parents to control what children watch on the television. Controling children is part of the training and caring for children. Bad friends can also influence children. As a matter of fact, television educates more than influencing children negatively.

Joel: Mr. Vicente, thanks for the interview.

Vicente: You are welcome.

An African Female Politician’s Bitter Experience Of Racism In Catholic Center Rome

 

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Cécile Kyenge: Has suffered a great deal since she became Italy’s first black minister.

Worldwide, governments, associations and organizations, continue to fight for women trapped under the burden of religion, politics, discrimination, sexual abuse and violence. Many underestimate and regard women as domestic care providers, thus they are denied the respect they deserve in the society, despite many occupying high positions within different professional careers.

To create a peaceful society and discourage violence and racism, racial offence carries a heavy fine or possibly jail sentence in certain countries. For example in Britain, a person who uses threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour, is guilty of an offence with intention to stir up racial hatred. The offence carries a maximum sentence of seven years imprisonment or a fine, but this is not the case in many European countries, including Italy, Belgium and Holland. Racial comments against others pass  daily with impunity in these countries.

Italy is one of the countries which has broken every rule in regard to racial issues, in the name of Catholicism. The Mafioso infested country encourages racism, sodomy and child abuse, right under the nose of the Vatican City. Lack of good leadership, corruption and Mafioso activities, have spread Italians all over the world like a virus. Instead of dealing with corruption and crime which have weakened the country’s economic and industrial infrastructure, Italian government promotes racism.

Cecile Kyenge

Cécile Kyenge

Since Cécile Kyenge became Italy’s first black minister of integration, she has openly been insulted by the media and many politicians with impunity. Cristiano Za Garibaldi, the deputy mayor of the town of Diano Marina in the northern region of Liguria, posted on his public Facebook page that Miss Kyenge used to be on a road patronized by prostitutes for soliciting clients, of whom many were black. Racist taunts come in daily against her. At a rally someone hurled bananas at her.

Roberto Calderoli, a senior party member, also last year compared the black minister Cecile Kyenge to an orangutan. How can a minister suffer this kind of discrimination and racism, while European leaders meet daily in the heart of Brussels, to discuss political issues without doing anything about this?

Even though Diano Marina apologized after making the offensive comments on his Facebook page, in any civilized world or country, such a person shouldn’t continue to serve Italy in any office. Certain comments shouldn’t be tolerated. Racial problems whether it affects white or black shouldn’t be encouraged in any way.

America always demonstrates to be a great country on such issues, whether the president of the country is black or white, but recent racial activities in the country, reveal America now encourages racism than discouraging it.

Nevertheless, during the inauguration day of Barack Obama, among other politicians and leaders who were at the US Embassy in Brussels, was Philip de Winter, the leader of ‘Vlaamse Belang’ a political party which seeks the interest of the Flemish people and speaks much against foreigners. Unfortunately, he wasn’t accepted to attend the inauguration. He went home disappointed and furious. This is how it should be if the world cares about peace, racism and discrimination.

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I find it a total disgrace, as European leaders converge at Brussels daily for summit and European Union programs, yet such disturbing racial issues of this kind going on in Italy and many places, but haven’t become an issue of concern to European leaders.

Racial problems should be a priority in every part of the world, because when violence erupts, it affects everyone. They shouldn’t ignore because it doesn’t affect them. A healthy nation thrives on peace, justice and respect but not racism and violence.

 

Angela Merkel: A Tireless Woman Carrying The Burden Of The European Union

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There was once Margaret Thatcher, who began her premiership on 4 May 1979, following the victory of the Conservative Party in the 1979 general election. Then Hillary Clinton, serving as United States Secretary of State in Obama’s administration, but despite the toughness of these two ladies in the field of politics, Angela Merkel is considered to be the most powerful woman in both Europe and international politics.

Who Is Angela Merkel?

According to the documentary film ‘Making of Merkel’ presented by Andrew Marr of BBC in 2013,  Angela Merkel was born Angela Dorothea Kasner, to Herlind Kasner, an English and Latin teacher, and Horst Kasner, a theologian and Lutheran minister. Her father moved the family to Templin, in East Germany, approximately an hour from Berlin, few weeks after her birth.

The clever Angela was proficient in academics, excelled in mathematics, science, and languages. Her parents encouraged her to join the Communist Youth Organization, the free German Youth to follow a career in politics. Even though Angela failed in physics course in high school, she decided to pursue a degree in physics from the University of Leipzig.

While studying at the university, she met fellow physics student Ulrich Merkel during a Russian exchange trip. They got married in 1977 and she graduated the following year with a degree in physics and physical chemistry. That wasn’t enough for Angela, she furthered her academic career and excelled to study at the elite German Academy of Sciences, earning a Ph.D. in quantum chemistry, in 1986.

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Angela Merkel at the age of three

Angela worked as a chemist at the Academy of Sciences, as one of the few female researchers, after earning her doctorate.  She was convinced that a career in science would protect her from the constraints of the East German regime. In 1982, Angela divorced her husband and married Joachim Sauer, a chemistry professor.

On November 9, 1989, the night the Berlin Wall fell, Merkel went to a sauna and then out for beers as she did every Thursday night. Her decision to stick to her typical routine is an example of her stark contrast to the way most people in Berlin reacted that night. In 1989, Merkel made a move toward a career in politics and joined the center-right activists of the Democratic Awakening party.

Her first job was unpacking boxes of new computers and setting them up for the office. A year later, she became the party’s spokeswoman, and renamed the party the Allianz für Deutschland, or Alliance for Germany. As a female with a doctorate in quantum chemistry, Merkel immediately stood out in the political realm.

Even in her new, more visible role as a spokeswoman, she kept her cropped haircut, baggy skirts, and sandals — and was criticized for it. Her male counterparts were so distracted by her appearance they offered to pay for new and more suitable clothes for her. Merkel’s rise to the top accelerated when she joined the largest party in West Germany, Christlich Demokratische Union.

She was selected for multiple positions by Helmet Kohl, her mentor and the leader of the Christian Democratic Union, or CDU. He appointed her as minister for women and, a few years later, as minister of the environment, where she oversaw controversial topics like nuclear safety. Kohl called her his “Maedchen,” or little girl, up until she publicly called for his resignation in 1999 after he was caught rewarding party funds to his friends.

“One of the things people don’t always understand about her is she’s actually a ruthless political operator,” former chief of staff to the UK Prime Minister Jonathan Powell told the BBC. “The way she dealt with all of her rivals in the CDU was extraordinarily Machiavellian. She would get rid of them in a twitch of an eyebrow.”

Four years later, she was elected as the new chairman of the CDU, making her the first woman to lead a major German political party. She began her campaign against the ruling Social Democrats leader, Gerhard Schröde. During a live television presidential debate, Schröder yelled at her across the stage, saying she should acknowledge that she was a “clear loser.”

She took the opportunity to calmly respond, a strategy she continues to use to undermine her opponents. Voters began to see her as an even-mannered and classy candidate. She became chancellor shortly thereafter.  Merkel’s most defining moments stem from her central role in managing the eurozone financial crisis. After other European nations began to reveal that they too had unmanageable debt, Merkel analyzed all possible options before agreeing to a massive bailout.

She was criticized for her slow-moving approach and rigid viewpoints. “People often accuse me of not acting fast enough. That I let things go on too long. For me it’s important I deliberate all options … running through scenarios, and not simply theoretical experiments in my head. “But I also try to live with that decision for a while. I think about it for a whole day, to see how it develops. What it will mean, what people are going to say about it, who’s going to write something about it, who’s going to criticize it,” Angela Merkel.

On her first trip as chancellor to the Kremlin, Russian President Vladimir Putin gave her a plush toy dog as a gift after learning she was attacked by a dog in the mid-’90s. At their next meeting, he asked for his black dog, Kony, to be brought into the room. Putin allowed the dog to run around while he sat with his legs widely stretched and a grin on his face. Merkel kept a poker face in front of Putin and later described his behavior as “weakness.”

“He’s afraid of his own weakness. Russia has nothing, no successful politics or economy. All they have is this,” she reportedly told a group of reporters. Ironically, Putin’s aggressive actions in Ukraine corroborate this point.

Source: The GuardianBild.de, and The New Yorker

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Angela Merkel and other world politicians

Merkel is credited for being the first chancellor to appreciate and support sports in her nation. The team declared her as the official mascot for the squad and calls her Muttivation, a play on her nickname, Mutti, meaning mommy. “The chancellor’s visit to the German team during the World Cup shows that she takes people and their interests seriously,” said market researcher Manfred Güllner of the Forsa Institute.

Source: The Guardian

Today German Chancellor Angela Merkel still continues her reign as the most powerful woman on the planet for 10 years running, clinching a third four-year term of Europe’s most vibrant economy in December 2014, making her the longest-serving elected EU head of state. She fought off a national recession during the global economic crisis with stimulus packages and government subsidies for companies that cut hours for workers, and she is in the thick of trying to help Greece revive its economy.

She has used her power against ISIS, breaking the post-Nazi-era taboo of direct involvement in military actions by sending arms to Kurdish fighters. In the Russia-Ukraine crisis, she has been engaging in shuttle diplomacy trying to broker a peace deal with Vladimir Putin. There’s only one woman who has a chance of endangering her tenure as No. 1 in 2016 — the world’s No. 2 most powerful woman.

Source: Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/profile/angela-merkel/