Barfield School: Book Review By Joel Savage

Book

The first novel in the trilogy, CALL OF FRANCE, Barfield School. The book is a dramatized portrayal of some of the things which led the author to become a longstanding expat in a country he’s always felt an irresistible attraction for

It’s great to be young because history reveals an entertaining account and discipline based on our lives as students while at school. When reading author Barry A Whittingham’s ‘Barfield School’ the reference sources and some of the scenes engaged my thoughts, reminding me of the great old days at school as the story unfolds.

‘Headmaster Fowler was almost unanimously disliked by his teaching staff and he was even detested by some.’ Are we familiar with such experience at school? This is my first point of interest in this book because at school many hate the authority for mistakenly taken discipline as punishment.

At chapter 26, page 140, the writer shares an interesting story about Christmas festivities. Like many families, we used occasions to solve family issues and here worried Michael knew about the existing tensions between his father and grandfather, hoping the Christmas family gathering would solve this problem which has given him worries for some time, surprisingly, everything went well as expected.

This incredible book is written in the form which suits both adults and teenagers as the author endeavors to bring to the attention of readers common inevitable family problems and how easily they could be solved, above all the choices we make in our lives and careers after leaving school, in the midst of hatred while under discipline.

‘Barfield School’ is arguably one of the best books I have ever read.  It’s not only inspiring but educative on moral grounds. I have received many books but I don’t often post reviews. Bringing this review to the attention of book lovers means ‘Barfield School’ is a perfectly written book I will recommend to readers.

https://www.amazon.com/Barfield-School-CALL-FRANCE-1/dp/2954302682/https://www.amazon.com/Barfield-School-CALL-FRANCE-1/dp/2954302682/

10 Lessons One Can Learn From The Hen

Hen 2Patiently the hen sits on her eggs to hatch her chicks

  1. Good planning: She first lays enough eggs before sitting on them.

2. Discipline: When she starts sitting on her eggs, she minimizes movements.

3.  Sacrifice and self-denial: She physically  loses weight while sitting on her eggs due to decreased feeding.

4. Indiscrimination and generosity: She can’t sit on eggs from another hen.

5.  Faith, hope, and courage: She sits on her eggs for 21 days, patiently waiting even if they do not hatch, she will lay eggs again.

6. Sensitive and discerning: She detects unfertilised eggs and roll them out.

7. Wisdom, consciousness, and realistic: She abandons the rotten eggs and starts caring for the hatched chicks even if it’s only one.

8. Protective love: No one touches her chicks.

9. Unity of purpose: She gathers all her chicks together.

10. Mentorship: She can’t abandon her chicks before they mature.

Even the greatest teacher, Jesus, led by the Holy Spirit taught from the hen. ‘Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen.’ Luke 13:34.

Never ever give up your divine dream. Be blessed.

James Baldwin’s Advice on Writing

“Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.”

James Baldwin’s Advice on Writing

In 1989, Paris Review founding editor and trailblazing interviewer George Plimpton edited a wonderful collection titled The Writer’s Chapbook: A Compendium of Fact, Opinion, Wit, and Advice from the 20th Century’s Preeminent Writers (public library). Among them was novelist, poet, essayist, and playwright James Baldwin (August 2, 1924–December 1, 1987), whom Plimpton had interviewed on two separate occasions in early 1984, half a century after Baldwin read his way out of Harlem and into the pantheon of literary greatness.

In a fantastic addition to the collected wisdom of celebrated writers, Baldwin looks back on his formidable career and shares what he has learned about the creative process, the psychological drivers of writing, and the habits of mind one must cultivate in order to excel at the craft.

James Baldwin with Shakespeare, 1969 (Photograph: Allan Warren)

Reflecting on what motivates great writers to write — an enduring question also addressed beautifully by George Orwell, David Foster Wallace, Italo Calvino, andWilliam Faulkner — Baldwin sides with Bukowski and argues that the supreme animating force of the writer is the irrepressible impossibility of not-writing:

Something that irritates you and won’t let you go. That’s the anguish of it. Do this book, or die. You have to go through that. Talent is insignificant. I know a lot of talented ruins. Beyond talent lie all the usual words: discipline, love, luck, but most of all, endurance.

Endurance, indeed, is perhaps the sole common denominator among successful authors. Any aspiring writer, he admonishes, should have no illusion about the endurance required but should want to write anyway. A generation after Jack Kerouac considered the vital difference between talent and genius, Baldwin notes:

If you are going to be a writer there is nothing I can say to stop you; if you’re not going to be a writer nothing I can say will help you. What you really need at the beginning is somebody to let you know that the effort is real.

In a sentiment reminiscent of Joan Didion’s observation that she writes in order to gain better access to her own mind, Baldwin speaks to the consciousness-clarifying function of the creative impulse:

When you’re writing, you’re trying to find out something which you don’t know. The whole language of writing for me is finding out what you don’t want to know, what you don’t want to find out. But something forces you to anyway.

Much of that self-revelation, Baldwin points out, happens not during the first outpour of writing but during the grueling process of rewriting. Echoing Hemingway’s abiding wisdom on the crucial art of revision, he adds:

Rewriting [is] very painful. You know it’s finished when you can’t do anything more to it, though it’s never exactly the way you want it… The hardest thing in the world is simplicity. And the most fearful thing, too. You have to strip yourself of all your disguises, some of which you didn’t know you had. You want to write a sentence as clean as a bone. That is the goal.

But as essential as that sense of incompleteness may be in guiding the revision process, it must be mediated by the awareness that completeness is a perennial mirage. (Decades later, Zadie Smith would observe in her ten rules of writing: “Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.”) Baldwin offers:

When you’ve finished a novel, it means, “The train stops here, you have to get off here.” You never get the book you wanted, you settle for the book you get. I’ve always felt that when a book ended there was something I didn’t see, and usually when I remark the discovery it’s too late to do anything about it.

Adding to the endlessly fascinating daily rhythms of great writers, which reflect the wide range of differences in the cognitive conditions of the ideal writing routine, Baldwin shares his work habits:

I start working when everyone has gone to bed. I’ve had to do that ever since I was young — I had to wait until the kids were asleep. And then I was working at various jobs during the day. I’ve always had to write at night. But now that I’m established I do it because I’m alone at night.

Complement The Writer’s Chapbook — a treasure so wisdom-packed that it is a tragedy to see it fall out of print — with Joseph Conrad on what makes a great writer, Willa Cather on the life-changing advice that made her a writer, and Jane Kenyon on what remains the finest ethos to write and live by, then revisit Baldwin on the artist’s role in society and his terrifically timely conversation with Margaret Mead about race and identity.

http://www.amazon.com/Writers-Chapbook-Compendium-Centurys-Preeminent/dp/B000NPS9KU

10 Powerful Proverbs Of Admonition

Bird

The bird just finished eating. Filled up, he flies up the tree and begins to sing praises to his creator for providing him food, nest and protecting him from rain, storm, and thunder. Yet the bird doesn’t know that underneath the tree, comes his enemy, the hunter, ready to shoot for his afternoon meal.

This is exactly how life on earth is when you don’t know your enemy. You may put a smile on your face every day, be kind and respectful to others, provide your family needs and be helpful when the needs arise, yet you’ve got an enemy you don’t know. Thus, be always conscious, watchful and careful where ever you step, so that you may live a happy life.

Here are 10 powerful and inspiring proverbs one should always keep in mind:

  1. Do not enter the path of the wicked and do not walk in the way of evil men.

2. Know this: People feed themselves with the bread of wickedness and drink the wine of violence.

3. The way of the wicked is like darkness, they do not know what makes them stumble.

4. Only fools despise wisdom and discipline.

5. My son, if sinners try to entice you, do not consent.

6. For because of a prostitute, a man is reduced to a loaf of bread, but the wife of another man preys on a precious life.

7. Say to wisdom “You are my sister and call understanding my relative.”

8. Whoever says to the wicked one “You’re righteous,” will be cursed by the people and denounced by the nations.

9. People will kiss the lips of the one replying honestly.

10. Do not boast about tomorrow, for you don’t know a day will bring.

Selected from the book of Proverbs of Solomon, the son of David and the king of Israel. There are hundreds of readers interested in religious articles like me, the reason I love Biblical articles.

There are more soul-uplifting and spiritual feeding articles in the Bible to read.

Please Support Campaign To End Abuse Of Autistic Children And Adults

Autism

Autism sufferers tend to be more creative.

All over the world, children are daily abused. Unfortunately, the abuse has no limit, it is extended to autistic patients too. Teachers, pupils and administrators disproportionately single out autistic students for violent punishment in the name of discipline. The Autistic Rights Together ‘ART’ is therefore calling everyone to support  the Campaign to end abuse of autistic children and adults. Who are ‘Autistic Rights Together?ART.png

Autistic Rights Together ‘ART’

Under Fiona O’ Leary, ‘ART’ is a non profit charity organisation consisting of Autistic people and like minded NT’s (Neurotypicals) who passionately believe in the empowerment of Autistic people to achieve equality and respect in modern day society.

We exist to provide true advocacy for the Autistic Community, by representing the all too often forgotten children, adolescents and adults on the Autistic Spectrum who live under the negative and shameful stigma which exists in society today. A stigma driven by the search for a cure, for the elimination of Autism, allowing for blatant and cruel experimentation and dehumanisation which often goes unchallenged by so many prominent Autism organisations and charities.

We exist to give Autistic people a voice, a meaningful input into the decisions made by the powers that be in regard to the future of those who live on the Autistic Spectrum.

For too long Autistic people have been excluded and ignored, we say no more, no more about us without us!

We hope to provide a platform for change, to be representative of the Autistic People who desperately crave the chance to be given the opportunity to be heard.

We hope to educate society at every level, to change the public perception of Autism from one of fear and negativity to one of Acceptance, empowerment and true inclusion.

http://autisticrightstogether.ie/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=794OKEEcxww&app=desktop

Belgium Journalists: What Do They Write About?

 

No discipline in Belgium schools

Sven Gatz: Flemish minister for culture, Media, and youth. He has a big responsibility to instill discipline in schools

In the publishing industry, there was a time the cover of a book doesn’t matter to readers, because many agree that the content or subject of the book gives the book recognition, makes it famous or masterpiece among titles. Then suddenly everything changed. Now hundreds of readers choose their books wisely because attractive covers.

Thus; if you are a journalist and you think because you’re holding Bachelor of Arts, Masters’ Degree or whatever qualification in journalism, those qualifications, will earn you the respect you are looking for, then I’m sorry, you are in a dream land or you’re likely lost in the desert.

In this modern era that journalism or the media plays a very important role in the society, the impact of your work, articles and your daily contribution to society, are what is necessary, but not one’s qualification. Because many have those qualifications but have no experience. Give them a pen to write something essential, you will be disappointed.

As one takes a wider view on things happening in our society today, the need to ask what’s role is the media playing to make things better in our decaying society is necessary. Go to schools, you will be astonished to see the lack of discipline that has taken over. Students don’t respect teachers and say bad things to them. In the toilets, students urinate indiscriminately on the ground, because they enjoy  cleaners cleaning their mess.

Young children, as young as twelve and thirteen are smoking. Many are dropping out of school because of teenage pregnancy and juvenile crime, while a lot of children are committing suicide every day. Even though there are thousands of journalists in Belgium, it’s rare to read articles from journalists, suggesting solutions to such disturbing issues or how to arrest the situation.

When you buy any Belgium newspaper, what one reads is politics and articles about immorality. Nothing significant or educating to read. It’s sad, yet they think they are on top of the world. What Belgium journalists fear most is to write the truth about Aids and Ebola, because their country took part in the medical crime against Africa.

Efficient journalism means accuracy, fairness, compelling, presentation, timeliness and relevance. It’s hard to find these qualities in Belgium journalists. They can’t even differentiate evil from good. They have proved it. None of their journalists is brave enough to demand the removal of the statue of the murderer King Leopold II, for killing over ten million Africans, including children, when there is no statue of Adolf Hitler for killing six million Jews.

Those days that European journalists want to prove to Africa that they are the most intelligent people on earth are gone. Now that we know, we shall continue to reveal their weaknesses, incompetency and their cowardly acts to the world. Out of the blue, a Belgian journalist followed me on Twitter. He suffered attacks  from other journalists and the following day, he unfollowed. Today, one of my respected followers is Queen Mathilde of Belgium, because she is a truthful and sincere woman.

Winning My Race: Discovering The Energy And Discipline To Fulfill Your Destiny

Learner 4

“How to embrace God’s “big why” for your life and the roadmap to complete it!”

Learner 1

The Author

Dr. Ben Lerner is the founder of Maximized Living — a scientifically based holistic healthcare process founded on 5 core, essential principles of health — and author of Body by God: The Owner’s Manual for Maximized Living and One Minute Wellness.

Dr. Lerner has served as physician for the US wrestling teams in six World Team competitions and two Olympiads. At seminars, conferences, and media appearances throughout North America, he shows people how to apply the four laws of Olympic success to achieve optimal health, outrageous happiness, and prosperity.

Dr. Lerner’s passion for Maximized Living is rooted in personal tragedy: he watched his father die at the age of 52, and his mother suffer a stroke shortly thereafter. In the midst of these traumatic events, he realized that his parents’ poor health was not the result of a single problem—instead they needed to eat better, exercise more, be less stressed, and manage their time better.

http://www.amazon.com/Winning-My-Race-Discovering-Discipline/dp/B006WC38N6