Could Poor Drainage System Leads To Flood And Fire Disaster In Ghana?

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Gas explosion in the city of Accra: Wednesday, June 3, 2015.

Ghana is mourning once again, after the Melcom shopping mall disaster in 2012. Without warning tragedy has struck. “This loss of life is catastrophic and almost unprecedented. A lot of people have lost their lives and I am lost for word.” These are the comments of Ghana’s President John Dramani Mahama, while visiting the scene of the blast, following a heavy torrential rainfall in the city of Accra.

During a heavy rainfall, people taking shelter from the rain at a gas station, unexpectedly find themselves engulfed by fire, following an explosion. According to eyewitness, the the strong blazing fire burnt everyone across its path. The Red Cross and emergency services retrieved dozens of bodies from the gas station in central Accra, where the fire occurred on Wednesday night, at about 10 pm.

Waste disposal, recycling and poor drainage systems, remain a key challenge facing many African countries, including Ghana. It’s not arguably that many cities in Africa are extremely dirty with garbage-choked drains, gutters and blockage of sewage pipes. Indiscriminately disposal of wastes such as plastic and polythene plastic and uncollected waste blocked holes and gutters brewing bad odour that engulfs the environment.

Apart from malaria and other tropical diseases, poor drainage system often leads to common floods, leading to death and destruction of properties. In the past, Ghana’s capital and its surroundings have experienced heavy rain and flooding, often causing mass destruction and taking lives. The question: How can the Ghanaian government prevent such tragedies?

It is always easier said than done, but there wouldn’t be any success or failure if one doesn’t try to do something. The Ghanaian government should consider embarking on a good waste disposal and underground drainage facilities. Ghana deserves it as a great nation, years after independence.

Under The Same Sky: From Starvation North Korea To Salvation In America

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A searing story of starvation and survival in North Korea, followed by a dramatic escape, rescue by activists and Christian missionaries, and success in the United States thanks to newfound faith and courage

Inside the hidden and mysterious world of North Korea, Joseph Kim lived a young boy’s normal life until he was five. Then disaster struck: the first wave of the Great Famine, a long, terrible ordeal that killed millions, including his father, and sent others, like his mother and only sister, on desperate escape routes into China. Alone on the streets, Joseph learned to beg and steal. He had nothing but a street-hardened survival instinct. Finally, in desperation, he too crossed a frozen river to escape to China.

There a kindly Christian woman took him in, kept him hidden from the authorities, and gave him hope. Soon, through an underground network of activists, he was spirited to the American consulate, and became one of just a handful of North Koreans to be brought to the U.S. as refugees. Joseph knew no English and had never been a good student. Yet the kindness of his foster family changed his life.

He turned a new leaf, became a dedicated student, mastered English, and made it to college, where he is now thriving thanks to his faith and inner strength. Under the Same Sky is an unforgettable story of suffering and redemption.

The Author

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Joseph Kim

Few can imagine what it is like to be homeless and starving as a child. Few can imagine life in the hermit kingdom of North Korea. However, refugee Joseph Kim knows both very well and he gives us a window into those worlds in his new memoir Under the Same Sky: From Starvation in North Korea to Salvation in America.

Kim became homeless during the great famine of the 1990s, which killed more than a million people including his father. After three years on the streets, he escaped to China where a network of activists connected him with the U.S. consulate. At 17 years old, Kim arrived in America as a refugee with no family and barely an education.

NPR’s Arun Rath spoke with Kim about his harrowing experience as a homeless kid on the streets of North Korea, and how he finally made it to America.

On his life before the famine

I was only 4 or 5 years old when the famine began so I can’t really remember much from before but what I can remember is that I was actually being able to play with my friends, everything was peaceful. I didn’t have to worry about when the next meal was gonna come or whether we are gonna have food or not.

On losing his family at 12 years old

So my mom actually ended up making a very difficult decision to sell my older sister to Chinese men. She came back to me in North Korea and she explained to me but I didn’t really understand at the time. But now I think about it and she did it so she could at least save her youngest child, which was me. After that my mom tried to go to China again to look for my sister and earn some money but she got caught so she was put in a prison facility.

On being homeless in North Korea

In order to survive as a homeless, probably one of the first things that you have to do is to give up your human dignity because if you try to keep yourself a human being and try to preserve your rights and right to be treated, you’re not going to be able to ask for food. I mean it’s really humiliating. You also have to cross the line where you have to stop worrying about or thinking about the morality. I was taught in school don’t steal it but if I don’t steal it, I can’t survive.

On escaping to China

I crossed where the river was frozen so I was able to run across the border. There was no security guard. [The] distance was not that long, maybe like 100 yards, but I feel like that was the fastest I ran in my life.

On being a refugee in America

Friends treat me as just a normal Korean-American student — although they know my stories, I think my friends allow me to be part of their group without labeling me as a North Korean defector. I feel definitely welcomed and accepted.