Belgium: Jef Merckx, Bamboo Bicycle Already Manufactured In Ghana Before You

ghana

Bamboo bicycle made in Ghana, the work of Miss Winifred Selby. Photo credit: Media Ghana.

History remains incomplete, because certain facts about Africa, have been swept under the carpet by Europeans, just to hide the truth and portray Africa as ignorant.

Is it true that apart from the looting of Africa’s rich mineral resources, including gold, diamond, Copper, Bauxite etc; the Europeans stole ideas from Africa to develop Europe, while they underdeveloped Africa?

In today’s (3/17/2016) Gazet Van Antwerpen, one of Belgium’s newspapers, was an article about Jef Merckx, introducing a Bamboo bicycle in Belgium. According to Merckx, Bamboo bicycle is lighter, faster and ecology, with the photo of him and the Bamboo Bicycle he has manufactured.

After reading the entire article, there wasn’t any indication anywhere in the article that Bamboo bicycle is long manufactured in Ghana, by a woman called Winifred Selby, who started her production at the age of 15. It is likely that Ghana is the first country in the world to manufacture Bamboo bicycle.

Like Always, Belgium has denied Ghana-Africa’s intelligence and knowledge and given the credit to someone who has stolen an idea from Africa, above all from a woman. What a shame?

ghana-2Miss Selby working on a new bicycle with Bamboo. Photo credit: Media Ghana.

There are many reasons journalism is said to lose its credibility. Gazet Van Antwerpen’s publication giving credit to Jef Merckx, as the manufacturer of Bamboo bicycle is one of them. Without investigation, they just published the stolen idea and knowledge from Africa. This is a mockery to the entire Belgian media. I told you so, and I will always tell you.

I DON’T EVEN WANT TO PUBLISH JEF MERCKX’s PICTURE ON MY BLOG, BECAUSE HE DOESN’T DESERVE IT.

Below is an article I published last year about Miss Winifred Selby.

https://joelsavage1.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/ghana-manufactures-bamboo-bicycles/

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Africa In The Hands Of China After Colonialism

Mugabe 3

Robert Mugabe shakes hands with Chinese president, Xi Jinping.  

Like the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, distinguishing the flames of communism, colonialism and Apartheid also faded after the Europeans lost its grip on Africa, when demanding of political independence swept through Africa colony in the fifties.

Even though Africa is much underestimated, the continent’s rich mineral resources always attract both developing and developed countries. China is now actively engaged in Africa, but under heavy criticism, because the West and America see them as opportunists interested in Africa’s resources.

Nearly 600 years ago, the first Chinese reached Africa during the Ming dynasty, a period of cultural restoration and expansion, on the coast of Kenya. The next significant arrival was in the early 1900s, when about 60,000 Chinese miners worked on goldfields in South Africa. Later, Chairman Mao Zedong sent tens of thousands of agricultural and construction workers to Africa to enhance ties with countries emerging from colonialism.

Africa, taken as a continent of ignorance, attract Europeans and Asians, because many believe that without enough education, Africa is a place one can easily sets up a business and be a boss. Weak economy, influenced by rampant corruption, has allowed African leaders quickly welcoming Chinese business entrepreneurs to Africa. The Chinese have taken over the construction works in Africa, employing hundreds of Chinese and African nationals, becoming the most aggressive investor-nation in Africa.

Although China is playing a significant role in the construction and engineering sectors in Africa, not everything that glitters is gold. Chinese companies are cutting into Africa’s profits. Most African companies are losing jobs to the Chinese companies, because a lot of the African leaders have confidence in them and also they offer lower construction prices. Nevertheless; trade between China and Africa reached a new high last year, totaling US$198.5 billion. It is estimated that about 1 million Chinese people are engaged to different sectors in Africa.

The strong presence of Chinese in Africa, has sparked controversy, as America and Europe continue to accuse them of flooding the market with inferior or cheap quality products. Due to the rate of poverty, Africans rely on affordably products. It seems they have found solution and satisfaction in Chinese products. To build a good relationship with African leaders China continues to support and giving loan to Africa to enhance its developments.

In Ghana, crackdown on illegal miners exploiting the gold industry, led to the deportation of thousands of Chinese nationals from the country. The Immigration authorities say more than 4,500 Chinese nationals were repatriated after a series of swoops on illegal goldmines; souring the relationship between the governments of Ghana and China.

Many Ghanaians and local residents aren’t happy over the action of the Ghanaian government. “They were the ones that provided the mining equipment, most of the Ghanaians left behind can’t continue their operations,” said one of the local residents, but many Ghanaians concerned about health and environmental hazards, lauded the government’s efforts to curb illegal mining.

The question is: Why years after colonialism Africa still depend on foreign aid, despite economic growth in many parts of the continent significantly outpacing the global average?’ How is the money spent and how can Africa progress without foreign aid? What is the significance of independence when Africa is still crawling like a baby learning how to move around?

Science and technology provide the transformation of every developing and developed country, in this way, Africa have to build expertise in these areas for the economy to take off, but since corruption has affected every infrastructure, the continent has a long way to go and will always lack behind in development.

10 Top Myths About HIV/AIDS

HIV Infection

Aids, a disease without a cure?

Original article published by REAL HEALTH TREATMENTS

Beginning to understand the challenges of HIV/AIDS starts by dealing with some of the common myths people tend to believe about the disease. Following are some of the myths and the actual facts about the disease.

1. HIV/AIDS is mostly a disease of homosexual men.
Primarily spread by heterosexual sex, HIV/AIDS now infects as many women as men worldwide. Although the disease was first recognized in the United States among gay men, it is also significantly spread among IV drug users. Internationally, it is more often a disease of heterosexuals.

2. HIV/AIDS is mostly an African problem.
Found in every country in the world, HIV infections are growing most rapidly in countries outside of Africa, including India and Russia. Many African countries have been decimated by HIV/AIDS, but the impact is also significant in Asia, Eastern Europe, and India.

3. HIV/AIDS spreads mostly because of poor moral choices.
Women are often infected by their husbands. Children most often contract HIV by being born to HIV+ mothers. It isn’t helpful or meaningful to determine who is at fault or who is an innocent victim.

4. Plenty of money is being spent on fighting HIV/AIDS.
While a great deal of money is being spent by governments, private organizations, and individuals to fight HIV/AIDS, much more is needed.

5. HIV/AIDS is no longer a problem in developed countries like Canada,United States e.t.c.
Because medications (Antiretrovirals or ARVs) are widely available in the developed countries, the death rate has decreased. But the number of people living with HIV/AIDS has not decreased and the rate of new infections is not declining.

6. ARVs are widely available.
While antiretrovirals are becoming more available, they are still difficult to find in many rural areas and in some countries. Both drugs and systems to distribute them are needed in many poor countries.

7. A cure exists for HIV/AIDS.
While there are treatments to prolong life, there is no cure. Many scientists are working on a cure but few believe there will ever be one way to effectively cure someone because the virus constantly changes.

8. There is no hope for those with HIV/AIDS.
Great progress is being made in treatments and the rate of infant infection in some countries is dropping rapidly. There is also a dropping rate of new infections in many countries with strong prevention programs.

9. If I’m not HIV+, the disease doesn’t affect me.
The high rate of HIV/AIDS infections is causing instability in many countries and reversing the progress made in development. It is also causing a worldwide tuberculosis pandemic. Every community is affected. A pandemic affects everyone even if not immediately recognized.

10. There’s nothing I can do.
Everyone can do something. First, become educated. Then help teach others in your church, school, and community. Begin to care and pray about how you and your church, school, and community can become involved. Begin to share your knowledge with your peers to help break HIV stigma and discrimination that exists in most communities today and to encourage others to be a part of this fight to end the stigma of those affected or infected with HIV/AIDS.

Link of original article: http://realhealthtreatments.info/the-top-ten-myths-about-hivaids/

The Embrace Of Illiteracy As Traditional Value In Africa

Female circumcision

A traumatized woman after circumcision

Africa is a vast continent filled with varieties of customs, traditions, cultures and languages. Some of these outdated traditions and customs are seen as senseless, useless, valueless, illiteracy and complete ignorance.

Female Circumcision: It is estimated that about 140 million girls and women worldwide are currently living with disastrous effects of female circumcision. Horrific procedures have severely traumatized and psychologically affected thousands of women. Female circumcision is practiced in 26 countries across Africa.

In the Republic of Sierra Leone, an ethnic group called “The Bondo Society” still carries this outdated tradition. Gambia launched a three-year program aimed to abolish Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). Female circumcision is the number one on my list as illiteracy taken as traditional or custom.

Tribal deformity in Nigeria

Horrible tribal marks of a Yoruba woman

Horrible tribal marks in Nigeria: In the olden days, tribal marks were used as identification, especially in Yoruba lands, such as Ogun, Oyo, Ondo States, and Benin. Should in case something happens to you, your tribal marks would help to identify the tribe you originate or where you come from. The illiteracy behind this barbarous act has disfigured the face of thousands of Nigerians.

Some of the marks are so horrible that they attract people and gossip. Some women have to live with it for the rest of their lives without husbands.  Time changes as we step into the world of technology and development. Disfiguring of the face as tribal marks is gradually fading away or completely stopped in many places thought out the country.

 

In South Africa, is a relatively landlocked country called Swaziland. The king of the country, Mswati III has 14 wives. This illiteracy which had been in existence for years is followed as a tradition.

The 46-year old monarch has ruled over Swaziland, which is on the brink of economic disaster for 28 years. He can’t even solve the problems of 40 per cent of Swazis that are unemployed, the country’s highest HIV infection rate per capita in the world, and the life expectancy of 46 years among the world’s lowest, yet at every annual reed dance, the king takes the opportunity to take a new wife. Is this king ignorant, serious or a joker?

Illiteracy swapped as a custom

Swaziland King Mswati III chooses a wife annually during Reed dance. Photo credit: Reuters

He recently married a girl of fifteen. Apart from the continued abuse of young girls, the king’s  wealth includes  expensive cars (fleets of top-of-the-range Mercedes and BMW cars, at least one Rolls-Royce and a $500,000 Daimler Chrysler flagship Maybach 62) and the private jet ($17 million), while the citizens wallow in poverty. This money can be invested into education and health care to develop his country. Have you seen how stupid and ignorant some of these African leaders are?

 

Illiteracy swapped as a traditional value

Ignorance or illiteracy? Swaziland King Mswati III has made Africa a laughing stock in the eyes of the Advanced World.

When Asia is making headlines around the world, it’s about business, but in the case of Africa, it’s about poverty, corruption, war, conflicts and such stupid traditions and customs, draining Africa’s coffers and under-developing Africa. I have said this and I will repeat once again “If African leaders want the Advanced World to respect them, they should show a little intelligence and maturity because they underestimate and laugh at Africa.

POVERTY AND CORRUPTION IN AFRICA

Poverty 4

Image of poverty in Africa amidst all the rich mineral resources

Original article published in ti-logo

WHAT’S AT STAKE?

Around 80 per cent of African people live on less than US$2 a day. Corruption is one factor perpetuating poverty. Poverty and corruption combine to force people to make impossible choices like “Do I buy food for my family today or do I pay a bribe to get treated at the clinic?” Poor people often have low access to education and can remain uninformed about their rights, leaving them more easily exploited and excluded. In order to fight against their social exclusion and marginalisation, poor citizens need a space for dialogue with the authorities.

WHAT WE’RE DOING ABOUT IT

To escape the vicious cycle corruption creates for disadvantaged groups, people need to be able to speak up for their rights and demand accountability from their leaders, ensuring access to basic social services and resources. If the social compact between the government and the people fails, citizens – and especially the poor – are forced to compromise on the quality of their livelihoods and their social and human rights.

Our Poverty and Corruption in Africa (PCA) programme enabled disadvantaged people to take part in development processes by opening dialogue between them and their governments. From video advocacy to pacts binding officials and communities to agreed development targets, every activity was tailored to the national and local context.

Communities focused on their most pressing issues – such as agricultural support, water supplies or free medicines, all underpinned by the common principles of community participation. With its universal principles and adaptable methods, the programme’s approach is applicable in communities far beyond its scope.

If people have a say in how they’re governed (participatory governance) and officials are accountable to the people they serve (social accountability), poor people become aware of their power and the force their voices have when raised. Participatory social accountability tools increase contact between citizens and governments, and therefore increase transparency, accountability and good governance. They reduce the opportunities for people in authority to abuse their power.

Increased citizen participation means better informed communities, more public oversight and less corruption in planning and monitoring local development. This creates a win-win situation: the poor benefit from local development, and people in power benefit from being considered champions of integrity, all while the community prospers.

WHO’S INVOLVED

The PCA programme ran in six different countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Six of our national chapters participated:

These chapters used different social accountability tools they developed to engage poor people and their governments in constructive dialogue. Starting on a small scale at the local level, their experiences show how the community participation they initiated gains momentum and ripples outwards, increasing the citizen-government interface further.

OUR APPROACH

In order to increase the voice the people have in shaping and monitoring service delivery, our chapter inLiberia set up poverty forums. These brought together authorities, service providers and communities for open discussions. These forums helped fill the information gap across a wide range of subjects, giving the people the confidence to contribute to decision-making and demand accountability from officials. Local officials now act with more transparency and integrity, unwilling to incur people’s criticism or loss of confidence.

Our chapter in Mozambique worked with community radio and activists to hold officials accountable for the quality of service delivery, by overseeing development budgets and planning. The community activists gathered information about irregularities in services and presented their complaints to local and provincial authorities. The process was reinforced by community radio programmes on fighting corruption, to inspire communities to demand accountability.

In Sierra Leone and Ghana, our chapters established monitoring groups to hold officials accountable. The committees monitor specific sectors such as health, education and agriculture. Members report their findings at quarterly meetings with public officials, where they agree on improvements needed. Monitoring team members then ensure these adjustments take place.

Using participatory video, the problems facing the communities are highlighted, and progress – or the absence thereof – can be recorded. Because making a video is easy and accessible, it is a highly effective tool to engage and mobilise marginalised people and to help them drive their own forms of sustainable development based on local needs. With community action at its heart, this approach opened dialogue between communities and the authorities.

Development pacts were used by our chapters in Uganda and Zambia as a way to hold officials accountable for public service delivery. These pacts act as a social contract, committing communities and officials to an agreed development priority. In Uganda, this meant transparent delivery of agricultural services, whereas in Zambia, the development pacts helped complete a bridge over a river that cuts a community off every rainy season. By opening projects to public scrutiny, in non-confrontational way, the pacts reduced opportunities for corruption, thus helping community members achieve their development targets

http://www.transparency.org/whatwedo/activity/poverty_and_corruption_in_africa

WWE: The Authority Still Fear Ex-Members Of The Shield Without Seth Rollins

Triple

Triple H and wife, Stephanie McMahon: Pride, ego and arrogant couple.

WWE  has been my best entertainment, not only because of my favourite wrestlers that sacrifice their bodies each week, to thrill fans but because of the stories behind it and what unfolds every week.

It’s good for a man to support his wife in running a business, but the pride of Stephanie McMahon, as the daughter of the Vince McMahon, the owner of WWE, has blinded Triple H, to follow his wife unwisely sometimes in running the affairs of WWE.

How many men or wrestlers, has Stephanie slapped across the face, including Daniel Bryan and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson? If she truly wants everyone to believe that she respects and loves her husband, Triple H, then she must give the same respect to wrestlers in and out of WWE.

Pride and ego have taken over her heart to the extent that, she thinks her father’s industry, feeds the entire American nation and all the wrestlers under the canopy of WWE, without realizing that there wouldn’t be any WWE today; if there are no fans or wrestlers.

They can run WWE at 9.99, but as a man dies, dry leaves fall and the mighty dollar falls sometimes, when the WWE fans begin to boycott the matches one day, they will understand that without them WWE is nothing and without the wrestlers, the company has no future.

The question everyone wants to ask Triple H is, why a sudden handshake request from Roman Reigns, after the injury of Seth Rollins? How does he want Reigns to react after masterminding the betrayal of  Dean Ambrose and him, by Seth Rollins? According to Triple H, for a very long time he has Roman Reigns in mind.

That’s a big lie. He lied, trying to build a good relationship with someone he feared. Surprisingly, WWE fans even knew he lied. Since Reigns didn’t cooperate, he has become Triple H’s enemy. Believe me, Triple H will do his underground work or everything to prevent Roman Reign getting hold of the world championship belt, but time will tell.

Ambrose

Dean Ambrose and Roman Reigns: The two biggest threats in WWE today.

The latest development on Monday Night Raw, 11/30/2015, evidently reveals the fear in the eyes of the authority, in regard to Roman Reigns and Dean Ambrose. At backstage, Reigns is talking to Dean Ambrose and The Usos when Triple H and Stephanie McMahon appear and asked Reigns to return the belt.

He laughs, and instead of Triple H, he gives it to Stephanie. He tells Triple H to tell Sheamus that he will take back the belt at TLC. Triple H replies, he already spoke to the champ, and he wants to put the belt on the line tonight. Roman is delighted, and Stephanie adds that he must win in 5:15. Why to defeat Sheamus within this short time? Since they can’t control Reigns, if he becomes world champion, they will do everything to prevent him from achieving his goals.

Later Triple H tells Dean Ambrose that if Reigns loses he match, then Ambrose loses his shot as number one contender to wrestle Kevin Owens for the Inter-Continental championship belt, because Reigns need to learn that his actions affect others. Why such harsh decisions? All come to the same answer, fear. The authority can’t deny that.

The authority may choose to manage WWE with iron fist, just  to dominate the wrestlers, but not everyone will yield to that domination. We have seen such wrestlers before in Randy Orton, CM Punk, John Cena etc;  now it’s Roman Reigns. He is not scared to hear “You’re firrrred.”

The Development Of Africa And Asia Through The Lenses Of Technology And Communication

ICT 3Modern technology, through communication and internet have influenced and enhanced Africa’s development, in a way that lives of many throughout the continent have significantly improved. The demand of ICT companies in Africa, have created fast growing mobile and internet markets providing employment to thousands of people.

A country without technology economy can never grow. It is therefore the effort of every government in Africa to invest into ICT facilities to sustain the economy. Technology is therefore essential and important establishing sustainable startup companies and firms in Africa. Today, several major technology trends are shaping the lives of Africans and the economies, with many formidable mobile companies, with communication tools such as the internet and telephone enabling quick access to every part of the world.

Let’s have a glance at the effect of ICT trends in Ghana, choosing MTN as an example. Officially launched in 1994, MTN Group is a multinational telecommunications group, operating in 21 countries throughout Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The MTN Group is listed on the JSE Securities Exchange in South Africa under the share code: “MTN” Detailed Report Data for 30 September 2010, MTN recorded 134,4 million subscribers across its operations in Afghanistan, Benin, Botswana, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Guinea Republic, Iran, Liberia, Nigeria, Republic of Congo (Congo Brazzaville), Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Uganda, Yemen and Zambia.

MTN MobileMoney,  a service which allows users to perform micro-financing and transfer money from their mobile device, has been adopted across the continent. The basic satisfaction behind this is the answer to customers’ dream of enjoying basic financial services on their mobile phones everywhere they go in Ghana and above all one doesn’t need a bank account to cash his or her money. This service provided by MTN in partnership with banks is also available on the internet. MTN MobileMoney service is recommended to be secure, simple, fast and convenient solution for money transfer and other transactions including reloading of MTN airtime units.

Let’s have a quick glance at India. What is a successful strategic technology? That is an existing technology that has matured, which is the case of India.  The country has become an IT brand among the global countries over the years, with strong policies base in education, well-established telecommunication & infrastructure facilities and favourable market conditions that prevail. Many Indian cities are now holding prominent places in the global IT map. Now India stands out as one of the biggest and fastest growing economies in the world.

The country’s matured technology offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage, continuing expansion in foreign firms owned establishments in India, with its emergence as favorite sector for local Indian investors and talented entrepreneurs. Yet Indian IT industry is still only in its very early stages of development both internationally and domestically and has strong growth potential.

The industry growing at 40 percent per annum between 1994 and 1999, with software exports alone more than 50 percent, earned revenue growth IT industry from $1 billion in 1990 to $8 billion in 2000, envisioned to reach $100 billion in 2008.

“While predicting the future is hard to do, it’s indubitable that the Internet and mobile technology will improve the lives of many Africans in the years to come,” said tech expert Rudy de Waele, who assists global brands and companies with cutting edge open innovation strategy on how to mobilize their business and products through projects, research, strategy, presentations, workshops and brainstorms.

ICT developed and developing continents, such as Africa and Asia hold its own communications future, as talent shines through and the continent becomes leading innovator, manufacturer and exporter throughout the continents and of the rest of the world.