10 Reasons Never Wish To Be A Celebrity

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Actress Winona Ryder, stole over $5,000 worth of designer clothing and accessories at the Beverly Hills Saks Fifth Avenue in 2001, despite all the fame and ‘success.’

Here comes a celebrity in glamorous dress, she wants to fly, yet she has no wings. The hungry paparazzi follow them where ever they go. Their names make the headlines in newspapers and faces appear on the television every time. That’s great isn’t it? And you wished to be one of them isn’t is? You can only taste a food before discovering how delicious or sour it tastes, because aroma or sweet scent can be deceiving.

Life is tough, so everyone wants to be successful, thus; many wish to be someone. Be careful what you wish for. If you haven’t been to someone’s farm before, you may think your farm is the biggest. No matter the weight of the problem, when hear someone’story, you’ll know that your problem is just as small as an ant or the tip of the iceberg.

Be content with what you have. Don’t be deceived. Who feels it knows it. Many smile behind suffering and live above their means, but your comfort, success and happiness, lie in your own hands. Below are ten reasons never wish to be a celebrity.

  1. Due to the thirst for fame and the desire to do something no other celebrity has done, they end up putting on degrading clothes they called it modern fashion.
  2. Many abuse the precious dignity of women by attending functions without underwear and they called it “Women Empowerment.”
  3. Many live beyond their means, buying expensive jewels, cars, houses etc; then later cry at home when running financially dry. Those in that situation often end up in shoplifting scandals.
  4. Most celebrities live in debt. The result is restlessness and lack of sleep.
  5. Many can’t handle fame, thus; they end up as drug addicts and alcoholics and often against the law.
  6. Some celebrities end up at rehabilitation centers, hospital and many commit suicide.
  7. Some date so many men and women to the extent that, by the time they are serious to settle and get married, nobody wants them, because they have misused their bodies.
  8. When many are bored, they take naked pictures of themselves and post it on social platforms.
  9. The fear of lacking behind in something or being forgotten by fans haunts them; therefore many do stupid things to attract media attention.
  10. Only few celebrities acknowledge God’s presence, as the omnipotent and depend on the gospel for salvation. Because of fame and pride many think God don’t exist and everything he or she owns comes from their effort.

There is nothing better than aiming high, following your dreams to be successful in whatever you want to achieve, but when pursuing that career, create a good name and inspire other people to follow you, because after your departure from this world, the seed you’ve sown, is what people would talk about. Would that seed be good or a bad one?

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Finders Keepers:Simple Book About Complicated Ideas

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Book review by Bethanne Patrick, a freelance writer.

As his dedicated readers know, multiple versions of Stephen King, Author, exist. There is the King of classic horror, like Cujo, Children of the Corn, and Christine. There is the King of feminist uprising, from Carrie toDolores Claiborne to Bag of Bones. There is the King of strong series work, like The Dark Tower and The Green Mile.

I could go on, but the King we meet in the new Finders Keepers (the second of what seems to be a trilogy starting with last year’s Mr. Mercedes) is yet another man: The King of chilling writer tales like Misery, a man who’s long explored the relationship between writing and madness, reading and obsession, artist and audience. In fact, one the things King chews over in this new book is the question of how many versions of an author do exist, and how those versions affect different people.

Finders Keepers picks up years after Mr. Mercedes left off: Famous novelist John Rothstein died back in the first book, and now we’re following zealous Rothstein fan Morris Bellamy, and a boy named Pete Saubers. (You may find plenty of spoilers in other reviews, but not here. It isn’t necessary to know all of the details in order to understand this new book, although they’re given early on in Finders Keepers. If you want to be surprised, pick upMr. Mercedes first.)

Due to an unexpected find, Saubers has become quite an expert on the late, reclusive Rothstein, whose creation and legacy must have been delicious fun for King to develop; he’s a mid-20th-century literary lion in the vein of J.D. Salinger and John Updike. Rothstein’s oeuvre even has Updike-esque titles: The Runner, The Runner Sees Action, and The Runner Slows Down.

When villainy threatens the Saubers family, they fortunately hit the radar of an eccentric trio (also from the first book): Ex-cop Bill Hodges, tech expert Jerome Robinson, and researcher Holly Gibney. At first, following three storylines—Bellamy’s, Pete’s, and the trio’s—feels a little elementary, the reading equivalent of training wheels, even though the writing is as sound as ever.

Then you remember that almost everyone needs training wheels before they take off on just two. King picks up the pace almost instantaneously, and vroooooooom, there goes the action! Vroom, too, goes the consideration of what is means to be a close reader. What matters more—knowing every detail, or understanding the big picture? Can you ever hold a writer responsible for his work, or does a reader’s interpretation change things?

Most important, perhaps, is the question of how we read other people. Most of the characters in this novel have their vision clouded one way or another, a mistake that can be costly. Stephen King sometimes writes complicated books about simple things (cars, baseball); here he writes a simple book about complicated ideas. And if, at first, you think Finders Keepers is meat-and-potatoes King, just wait: The dessert is really satisfying.

The Author

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Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Doctor Sleep and Under the Dome, now a major TV miniseries on CBS. His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller as well as the Best Hardcover Book Award from the International Thriller Writers Association. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

http://www.amazon.com/Stephen-King/e/B000AQ0842/