Children’s Story: Why The Sheep Often Stands In The Middle Of The Road But The Goat Wouldn’t

Stories play vital role in the lives of children. Years back, our ancestors create stories to entertain children.There are thousands of African stories for children.

Everyone knows how stubborn the Goat is and humble the Sheep is, yet they put aside their differences to become friends.

In an argument, the Goat told the Sheep: “You are very stupid.” And the Sheep told the Goat: “Don’t let my humbleness deceive you, because I’m one of the wisest creatures on earth.”

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The goat escapes through the window of the bus, after failing to pay his fare  for the journey.

“Why are you called ‘The Stubborn Goat? Let me remind you of this reference in Psalm 109:3, about me: The Sheep quotes, “You know that the Lord, he is God! It is he, who made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.” “Because you are stubborn, your reference in the Bible is “Separating Goats from Sheep,” you better change your ways, to inherit the Kingdom of God.” The Sheep concluded.

What the Sheep told Goat, touched him emotionally that he decides to repent and change his ways. He suggested to the Sheep that they should embark on a journey to have a good time, to enable him learn more from him and the Sheep agreed. The fully prepared Sheep took everything he needs for the journey, including money to buy food.

Even though the Goat is aware of what they need for the journey, he took everything and ignored taking some money with him. It seems the greedy and stubborn Goat isn’t yet ready to change his bad habits. Mid way in the journey, the driver’s mate starts collecting the fare from passengers. Everyone in the bus, including Sheep paid, but the Goat told the mate: “My money is deep in my pocket, I will pay you when we reach our destination.”

The driver’s mate refused to accept Goat’s explanation, because he knows how cunning Goat is. He told Goat: “I will only agree to your proposal if you allow me to put this rope around your neck, so that you might not escape.” The answer goat wasn’t expecting made him start sweating profusely. Goat knows that he has no choice than to escape. While the vehicle still in motion, the desperate Goat leaped through one of the opened window’s of the bus, leaving his seat and Sheep behind.

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The sheep stands in the middle of the road waiting for the driver’s mate to collect back his change.

The stupefied Sheep was shocked to the extent that he forgets to collect his change, after making the payment to the driver’s mate, while Goat’s name was added to the wanted people’s list. This is the reason the Goat many times escapes when he sees an approaching vehicle, while Sheep stands in the middle of the street, waiting for the driver’s mate, to collect back his forgotten change.

NB: One of my new projects “Anthology Of African Stories For Children,” comes out next year. (2016) In this book, the writer collects the best inspiring, educative and interesting stories, brewed from African pot, to entertain children all over the world. Let your children enjoy diversity of culture by having a copy of this wonderful book.

Twitter: The Cheating Games Many Users Play On That Social Media

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‘Twitter is an online social networking service that enables users to send and read short 140-character messages called “tweets”. Registered users can read and post tweets, but unregistered users can only read them.’ That’s the sweetest and shortest introduction of this famous social media, business men, entrepreneurs and people from all walks of life engaged for their livelihood.

On Twitter activities are tweeted, mails are exchanged and friendships are made. However, since every society there are both good and bad people, the same way the social media is occupied by both good and bad people, including people that take the advantage to cheat and those that do desperate things just to gain followers.

I registered on Twitter in 2011. Among all the social media, Twitter was the one I gave less attention to, concentrating much on Facebook. It seems I didn’t know the worth or significance of the Twitter that time. I got notification of every follower, but ignored without following back. Probably I wasn’t  even aware that I need to follow back, because I was green and amateur to social media.

After learning much about Twitter, it was too late and most of those that followed me were gone and when I became more serious on Twitter, following back my new followers, I realized that the social media I had ignored for over two years, worth more than ‘silver and gold.’ Frankly speaking, it is not easy to build or solicit for followers. People are crying to be followed on Twitter, because the more followers you have, the evidence that you are either celebrity or an important person in the society.

The hard way to generate followers genuinely without purchase, has increased dishonesty and cunning activities on Twitter. Out of the blue comes a message of followers. You want to be honest and sincere, so you follow them back, but after two or three days, those you sincerely followed them, unfollow you to increase the number of their followers. Some even do that the same day. Most people who do that profile reads “Following 1,257, Followers 315. Instead of them ‘unfollow’ those who aren’t following them, they unfollow the follower, they think aren’t important to follow.

Thanks to ‘Tweepdash’ which gives me information of those unfaithful ones to weed them out from my yard. On Twitter you see profiles like ‘Be Distinct.’ He wants to fly but has no wings and wants to be a celebrity by means of Twitter. He follows you and a day after he unfollows. This is the style many Twitter users adopt to increase the number of their followers and be ‘distinct.’

I wonder why people make a fun of themselves in this manner and think they are very intelligent. Greed is everywhere and wherever it exists, corruption and dishonesty rule. People pay for book review to be given a good review and many writers who hate to do such things, are merely seen as bad writers, because they see no review yet for their books.

I will always be happy even if I have one follower, because there is a reason that person followed me. I’m fortunate to have great authors such as Joel Friedlander, CNN’s Jim Clancy and musicians such as Chuck D of Public Enemy and Digital Underground following me on Twitter.

King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story Of Greed, Terror, And Heroism In Colonial Africa

In the 1880’s, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium seized for himself the vast and mostly unexplored territory surrounding the Congo River. Carrying out a genocidal plundering of the Congo, he looted its rubber, brutalized its people, and ultimately slashed its population by ten million–all the while shrewdly cultivating his reputation as a great humanitarian.

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Heroic efforts to expose these crimes eventually led to the first great human rights movement of the twentieth century, in which everyone from Mark Twain to the Archbishop of Canterbury participated. King Leopold’s Ghost is the haunting account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions, a man as cunning, charming, and cruel as any of the great Shakespearean villains.

It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who fought Leopold: a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure and unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust. Adam Hochschild brings this largely untold story alive with the wit and skill of a Barbara Tuchman.

Like her, he knows that history often provides a far richer cast of characters than any novelist could invent. Chief among them is Edmund Morel, a young British shipping agent who went on to lead the international crusade against Leopold. Another hero of this tale, the Irish patriot Roger Casement, ended his life on a London gallows.

Two courageous black Americans, George Washington Williams and William Sheppard, risked much to bring evidence of the Congo atrocities to the outside world. Sailing into the middle of the story was a young Congo River steamboat officer named Joseph Conrad. And looming above them all, the duplicitous billionaire King Leopold II.

With great power and compassion, King Leopold’s Ghost will brand the tragedy of the Congo–too long forgotten–onto the conscience of the West.

The Author

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Adam Hochschild (pronunciation: ”’Hoch”’ as in “spoke”; ”’schild”’ as in “build”) published his first book, “Half the Way Home: A Memoir of Father and Son,” in 1986. Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times called it “an extraordinarily moving portrait of the complexities and confusions of familial love . . . firmly grounded in the specifics of a particular time and place, conjuring them up with Proustian detail and affection.”

It was followed by “The Mirror at Midnight: A South African Journey,” and “The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin.” His 1997 collection, “Finding the Trapdoor: Essays, Portraits, Travels,” won the PEN/Spielvogel-Diamonstein Award for the Art of the Essay. “King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa” was a finalist for the 1998 National Book Critics Circle Award. It also won a J. Anthony Lukas award in the United States, and the Duff Cooper Prize in England.

Five of his books have been named Notable Books of the Year by The New York Times Book Review. His “Bury the Chains: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire’s Slaves” was a finalist for the 2005 National Book Award in Nonfiction and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History.

“To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918,” Hochschild’s latest book, was a New York Times bestseller. It was a finalist for the 2011 National Book Critics Circle Award for General Nonfiction and won the 2012 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Nonfiction.

The American Historical Association gave Hochschild its 2008 Theodore Roosevelt-Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service, a prize given each year to someone outside the academy who has made a significant contribution to the study of history.

“Throughout his writings over the last decades,” the Association’s citation said, “Adam Hochschild has focused on topics of important moral and political urgency, with a special emphasis on social and political injustices and those who confronted and struggled against them, as in the case of Britain’s 18th-century abolitionists in ‘Bury the Chains’;

‘The Mirror at Midnight’, a study of the struggle between the Boers and Zulus for control over South Africa in the 19th-century Battle of Blood River and its contentious commemoration by rival groups 150 years later; the complex confrontation of Russians with the ghost of Stalinist past in ‘The Unquiet Ghost: Russians Remember Stalin’; and the cruelties enacted during the course of Western colonial expansion and domination, notably in his widely acclaimed ‘King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa’, among his many other publications. All his books combine dramatic narratives and meticulous research. . . .

” ‘King Leopold’s Ghost’ had an extraordinary impact, attracting readers the world over, altering the teaching and writing of history and affecting politics and culture at national and international levels. Published in English and translated into 11 additional languages, the book has been incorporated into secondary school curricula and appears as a key text in the historiography of colonial Africa for college and graduate students.

But it is within Belgium that Hochschild’s work has had the most dramatic impact, demonstrating the active and transformative power of history. The publication of ‘King Leopold’s Ghost’ forced Belgians to come to terms for the first time with their long buried colonial past and generated intense public debate that so troubled Belgian officials that they reportedly instructed diplomats on how to deflect embarrassing questions that the book raised about the past.

The book offered welcome support for others in Belgium who sought acknowledgment and accountability for Belgian actions in the Congo. . . . Few works of history have the power to effect such significant change in people’s understanding of their past.”

Hochschild teaches narrative writing at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley. He and his wife, sociologist and author Arlie Russell Hochschild, have two sons and two granddaughters.

https://joelsavage1.wordpress.com/2015/09/21/face-to-face-with-the-ghost-of-belgiums-king-leopold-ii-special-interview-with-the-idi-amin-of-belgium/

http://www.amazon.com/King-Leopolds-Ghost-Heroism-Colonial/dp/0618001905