Humour: The Man With A Sad Face

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The man with a sad face

Sometimes before a baby is born, his or her parents had already suggested suitable names for the child. Names are influenced by our popular culture, tradition and heroes. Many people bear Biblical names, others not. As a Ghanaian from the Fantse tribe, my traditional name is Ato or Kwamena, because I was born on Saturday.

Names mean a lot but it’s not everyone who knows someone’s name. That’s the reason we often hear “Please what’s your name?” You may know someone because you’ve seen the person a couple of times, but may not know his or her name. I am one of them. In the neighbourhood where I grew up in Africa, few knew me but don’t know my name.

One day someone I know came looking for me in the neighbourhood where I lived. That was his first attempt to visit me. He mentioned my name, yet no one could help him. One Good Samaritan tried his best to help him. “Can you please describe the man you are looking for,” he asked the stranger. “He is a man with dark complexion, about 5 feet 10 inches tall, whose face looks like someone crying.”

“May be I know him, because there is a man who lives close to the beach, whose face really looks like someone crying, maybe it’s him,” said the Good Samaritan.

“Can we go to see if he is the one,” said the stranger. I was at home when I heard a knock on the door, as soon as I opened, stands Ben, my cousin who lives in the Western Region of Ghana. He narrates the funny description which led to my discovery.

“What, do my face looks like someone crying?” I asked.

“If your face doesn’t look like someone crying, how can this Good Samaritan realize that to come home with me? Ben asked.

This is not a matter of anger but laughter. I laughed so hard that my stomach ached, the fact that Ben has never told me this before. After Ben’s visit, I thought about this for a very long time and decided to get rid of this funny and humourous description about me.

By then I’ve heard of the book called ‘The Power of Positive Thinking” by Norman Vincent Pearle. I contacted a friend who had more books than me and borrowed Norman’s book from him. It was a very thick book but inspiring. “Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy.” – Norman Vincent Pearle.

I did really enjoyed reading this interesting book. In fact, I have no words to describe how the book miraculously transformed my life, to get rid of that hidden facial expression which I have lived with for years without my knowledge. Well, it may be that my face still looks like someone crying, because of too much trouble in this world.

Annabelle Franklin’s Gateway To Magic

Magic

STEVEN IS A BOY WHO PLAYS TO WIN – BUT THIS IS NO GAME. THIS IS AN ADVENTURE HE CAN’T CONTROL.

Steven Topcliff loves gaming but doesn’t believe in fairies or magic – until tricky cousin Tracy drags him away from his game console and gets him to press a red button on a mysterious stone they find in the local park. The stone turns out to be a one-way gateway to Fairyland, where nature rules supreme and technology is banned by law.

Lost without his video games, Steven struggles to survive in this scary new world. The inhabitants are dangerous, sometimes deadly. The Land itself is a living being that deals out instant magical punishments to lawbreakers. And the truth about Tracy is terrible indeed. Homesick and horrified, Steven is desperate to escape.

Ignorant of the rules, it’s not long before he breaks them and ends up in the custody of the ruthless Fairy Queen. He learns she’s the living power behind the Land and its creatures, and she has no intention of setting him free. He also suspects she’s not telling him her true reason for keeping him prisoner.

Whatever her game is, Steven isn’t about to play it her way. His only chance of escape is to magic his own gateway home, so he attempts to build up some psychic muscle. The Queen uses all her guile to distract and torment him, and he lives in dread of being eaten alive by gruesome snake-like monsters that live in her garden; but the biggest block to his concentration is his own lack of faith. He still doesn’t believe it’s possible for a human being to do magic.

Can he believe in himself enough to forge the new gateway? And can he rely on the few friends he’s made to help him outwit the Queen?

The Author

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I live on the South Gower coast, in an area of outstanding natural beauty that gives me plenty of inspiration. I hate housework and often wonder if there’s a breed of gruesomely grubby goblin whose sole purpose is to mess up people’s homes. My new book The Slapstyx explores this idea.

I like to think the fabric of material reality is riddled with holes leading to magical dimensions. When my nephew had a phase of video game addiction, I wondered how he would manage in a dimension where technology was banned: would he embrace the adventure or suffer withdrawal symptoms? This is how I came to write Gateway to Magic.

I spent most of my time in school writing stories, whether I was meant to be doing it or not. Since then I’ve had various jobs, played in two bands, taught children to play keyboards, written and performed in plays and made a short film. One of my scripts was shortlisted in a BBC scriptwriting contest, with positive feedback from Tony Jordan.

I share my home with Millie and Pearl, two beautiful rescue dogs who allow me to see the world through their eyes. They are also responsible for a lot of the mess.

http://www.amazon.com/Annabelle-Franklin/e/B00CHL8RF0/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1