It’s Just Beautiful A Woman Holds Her Breast When Running, But That Doesn’t Mean It’s Going To Fall Off

 

Kente is now internationally known and often used by African-Americans

The slice of Ghanaian culture presented in Kente cloth by a pretty woman

The diversity of culture is very interesting and broad subject. I like to share interesting articles with readers eager to know about other people’s culture, custom and heritage. Africans used proverbs a lot in their daily conversation and admonition. 

In 1985, my first time in Freetown, Sierra Leone, I entered into a restaurant and ordered for a plate of rice. On top of my rice was a strange greenish stew, which wasn’t good for me after tasting it. I asked the woman what it was and she told me it was prepared by cassava leaves.

She said I can try potato leaves stew,  if I want. I said ‘No’ and I went away. Months after living in Freetown and knowing much about their culture and food, I found out how delicious cassava leaves stew was. From time to time, I requested for the food I once rejected, any I went to the restaurant. It’s interesting to know about someone’s culture and food.

“It’s just beautiful a woman holds her breast when running, but that doesn’t mean it’s  going to fall off,” is one of Ghana’s intriguing proverbs.

The sight of a woman creates first impression. There are many things that put men off, especially when a woman’s hair isn’t well styled or when shabbily dressed.

In Africa it’s very common to see women running. I don’t think any one will find a woman attractive as her breasts flap on her chest as she runs.

Holding her breast while running, is one of the ways revealing how conscious a woman is over her body and truly men find it nice in that way too.

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Cardinal Rule: A Short Story

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Cardinal Rule: A Short Story is romantic, but this isn’t a romance…

What do you do when you’ve been there and done that – the good, the bad and the ugly? Meet Earline Jones, a woman who is easy on the eyes and hard on a man – when she loves him.

What do you do when you know who you love, but you don’t know how to express it? Meet Theodore Roosevelt Washington aka Teddy. When he falls in love with a woman, he hones in on her smallest details – and cracks jokes about them.

While enjoying a quick rendezvous, Earline and Teddy are consumed by three things: expressing what makes their hearts beat, sitting in red hot heat and eating ice cold treats. It quickly becomes an intersection between affection and reflection.

Buy Cardinal Rule, featuring Teddy (from the short story Swiggers in Independent Author Index Short Story Compilation, Volume 1) and introducing Earline Jones, and join the discussion.

This version of “Cardinal Rule: A Short Story” is 3,100+ words and includes a bonus Author’s Note section and more.

Praise for Cardinal Rule: A Short Story:

“I enjoyed reading Cardinal Rule. The dialogue and interaction between the two characters was great. I actually didn’t expect the ending.”

“Their conversation regarding their relationship was captured by a chocolate shake and a bowl of strawberry ice cream. Very clever, Joey…”

“I thought this story was very funny. It was real- I’ve heard many conversations that went along the lines of this story, and it just felt real!”

“I enjoyed a different type of storytelling infused with symbolism, sensuality, and innocence.”

“I enjoy well-developed characters. For short stories, a difficult task at best.”

“Great short story about the push and pull of relationships.”

“The information was included afterwards was indepth.”

The Author

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Joey Pinkney is an award-winning author, award-winning book reviewer, book promoter and chocoholic. He favors writing short stories, novellas and essays over longer pieces. His short stories have been published in various in anthologies and compilations.

He has been an active participant in the book industry for over a decade – and has been writing for even longer. His first published book review came in 2004 in a local newspaper in Nashville, TN. Since then, he has reviewed book for various book industry websites. He also maintains a popular author interview and book review series.

http://www.amazon.com/Joey-Pinkney/e/B014B3VZ28

My Name Is Savage, But I am Not Savage

Big Joe 5“Whatever happens to me benefits me.” – Joel Savage

Why many do ask me if ‘Savage’ is my real name? Once a British woman told me she hates her name ‘Mrs Ball’ and worst of all, my father’s name is ‘Mr. Underworld,’  she said. Yes, many of us have strange names. Some do change and others keep them.

I was born Joel Savage, at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana, on January 19, 1957, to Justin Savage, a professional journalist and Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson, an accomplished seamstress and a sewing teacher.

Last year, during my summer holidays in Barcelona, Spain, I gave one of my books to a student I met at the hotel I lodged. At the computer hall, I was flabbergasted when I saw his friends laughing at my name. I pretended I wasn’t listening to their conversation.

Then on January 1, 2016, history repeats itself. At the Kotoka International Airport in Accra, Ghana, when ready to board my flight, an officer at the last checkpoint controlled my passport and the only question he threw at me is: How do you pronounce this word? Pointing directly to the name, “Savage,” I answered.

“Well, I’m glad that you mentioned it yourself, because I thought that may provoke you if I had said the same thing.” He said and gave back my passport to me.

If names have impact on people, then I am exceptional. I am happily married since 1993 and still live with the same woman. If I’m savage, uncivilized, cruel or a beast, my wife wouldn’t have been with me today. My three sons can stand behind me and tell everyone how caring and compassionate their father is.

What I know about myself is, I have intrepid sort of character. I don’t give up and no one can break me down physically, psychologically, emotionally or spiritually. In my life, I take any misfortune as beneficial and every problem as a challenge, because you can’t survive in this world if you submit to problems.

This is the reason many people are depressed, alcoholics or drug addicts. Because they don’t have the will power to fight and overcome those destructive tendencies. Savage is just a name but it has no influence on me. I believe in God and the Bible is my shield and Armour.

Authors In Arms: Meeting Writer Femi Akomolafe

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 Femi Akomolafe and Joel Savage

I have read uncountable books by European and America authors, but as an African writer, I love also the books of African writers, because they give accurate accounts of what Africans went through during the colonial era and the destruction of the continent by Europeans, since only few European and American writers are brave enough to give the right account of whatever crime they committed on that continent. 

One of the African writers whose work caught my attention is the Nigerian author, Femi Akomolafe. His books on Africa are – Africa: It shall be well and Africa: Destroyed by the gods. His contemporary works include colonisation, religion and slavery in Africa.

During my recent visit to Ghana, I took the opportunity to visit him at his residence in Kasoa, a community which lies in the central region of Ghana, but close to Accra.

A passionate Pan-Africanist, Femi writes as a columnist for the Accra-based Daily Dispatch newspaper. The globetrotter Femi lives in both Europe and Africa.

His extensive work reflects on Africa-related issues in his books and for various newspapers and magazines. He was the producer of the FOCUS ON AFRICANS TV Interview programme for the MultiTV Station.

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The knowledge of a writer is from his books: Akomolafe’s collection.

He is also the CEO of Alaye Dot Biz Limited Dot Biz, a Kasoa-based Multimedia organisation that specializes in Audio and Video Production. Despite his busy activities, Femi always has some time to be with family.

At his residence, I was fascinated about his huge number of books, stacked on a temporary constructed shelves, after losing almost all his property in flood. Our conversation centered on his works and what he has in store in the near future. Femi has interviewed many people from all walks of life.

You can explore more of his works on “Alaye Web Television.” – http://alaye.biz/videoscategory/focus-on-africans/

Author Femi Akomolafe’s books: http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Femi-Akomolafe/e/B00MCZ00G0/