Africa In The Hands Of China After Colonialism

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Robert Mugabe shakes hands with the Chinese president, Xi Jinping.  

Like the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, distinguishing the flames of communism, colonialism and Apartheid also faded after the Europeans lost its grip on Africa, when demanding of political independence swept through Africa colony in the fifties.

Even though Africa is much underestimated, the continent’s rich mineral resources always attract both developing and developed countries. China is now actively engaged in Africa, but under heavy criticism, because the West and America see them as opportunists interested in Africa’s resources.

Nearly 600 years ago, the first Chinese reached Africa during the Ming dynasty, a period of cultural restoration and expansion, on the coast of Kenya. The next significant arrival was in the early 1900’s when about 60,000 Chinese miners worked on goldfields in South Africa. Later, Chairman Mao Zedong sent tens of thousands of agricultural and construction workers to Africa to enhance ties with countries emerging from colonialism.

Africa, taken as a continent of ignorance, attract Europeans and Asians because many believe that without enough education, Africa is a place one can easily set up a business and be a boss. A weak economy, influenced by rampant corruption, has allowed African leaders quickly welcoming Chinese business entrepreneurs to Africa. The Chinese have taken over the construction works in Africa, employing hundreds of Chinese and African nationals, becoming the most aggressive investor-nation in Africa.

Although China is playing a significant role in the construction and engineering sectors in Africa, not everything that glitters is gold. Chinese companies are cutting into Africa’s profits. Most African companies are losing jobs to the Chinese companies because a lot of the African leaders have confidence in them and also they offer lower construction prices. Nevertheless; trade between China and Africa reached a new high last year, totaling US$198.5 billion. It is estimated that about 1 million Chinese people are engaged in different sectors in Africa.

The strong presence of Chinese in Africa has sparked controversy, as America and Europe continue to accuse them of flooding the market with inferior or cheap quality products. Due to the rate of poverty, Africans rely on affordable products. It seems they have found solution and satisfaction in Chinese products. To build a good relationship with African leaders China continues to support and giving a loan to Africa to enhance its developments.

In Ghana, a crackdown on illegal miners exploiting the gold industry led to the deportation of thousands of Chinese nationals from the country. The Immigration authorities say more than 4,500 Chinese nationals were repatriated after a series of swoops on illegal goldmines; souring the relationship between the governments of Ghana and China.

Many Ghanaians and local residents aren’t happy over the action of the Ghanaian government. “They were the ones that provided the mining equipment, most of the Ghanaians left behind can’t continue their operations,” said one of the local residents, but many Ghanaians concerned about health and environmental hazards lauded the government’s efforts to curb illegal mining.

The question is: Why years after colonialism Africa still depend on foreign aid, despite economic growth in many parts of the continent significantly outpacing the global average?’ How is the money spent and how can Africa progress without foreign aid? What is the significance of independence when Africa is still crawling like a baby learning how to move around?

Science and technology provide the transformation of every developing and developed country, in this way, Africa have to build expertise in these areas for the economy to take off, but since corruption has affected every infrastructure, the continent has a long way to go and will always lack behind in development.

Top 20 African Countries Stink Of Corruption

Women sell food from their canoe at Makoko fishing community in LagosLagos: The Makoko slum in oil rich Nigeria crippled by corruption

In the abundance of water, is the fool thirsty? Africa is blessed with natural resources such as gold, oil, diamonds, cobalt, iron, copper, uranium, silver, bauxite, cocoa beans and petroleum etc. Unfortunately the standard of living of many people in the continent is deplorable. This is largely due to corrupt governments ruling many countries in the African continent.

Transparency International has been publishing the corruption perceptions index (CPI) since the turn of the new millennium. If a country has a CPI of 100 it is very clean. If the score is 0, then the country is highly corrupt.

Here is a brief overview of the top 20 most corrupt nations in Africa as of 2014, according to Transparency International.

=24. Mozambique (CPI score: 31)
Although the government of Mozambique has taken steps to fight corruption, its still a big problem. Corruption remains in both the public and donors, who support almost half of the nation’s budget.

=24. Sierra Leone (CPI score: 31)
Systematic corruption has caused weak governance and widespread poverty in Sierra Leone. The anti-corruption institutions still lack resources, staff and expertise.

=24. Tanzania (CPI score: 31)
Although there are comprehensive laws to fight corruption, its still a serious problems in Tanzania with bribery is often demanded in the business sector.

23. Mauritania (CPI score: 30)
Corruption has become deeply entrenched in Mauritania. Part of what fuels corruption in this nation is the insufficient information or absence of transparency about local companies, the identities of their owners, and financial report.

=21. Gambia (CPI score: 29)
Gambia’s judiciary is subject to pervasive political interference, and there is corruption in many parts of the government.

=21. Togo (CPI score: 29)
Corruption in Togo is common and those involved rarely punish. Corruption more among prison and police officers, and members of the judiciary.

20. Madagascar (CPI score: 28)
Madagascar is one of the world’s poorest countries and has had a negative growth due to corruption.

=18. Cameroon (CPI score: 27)
In Cameroon, many corrupt civil servants drive around in their expensive luxury cars. People who try to bring these corrupt officers to justice pay a high price.

=18. Nigeria (CPI score: 27)
Political corruption pervades Nigeria. The rise of public administration and discovery of petroleum and natural gas have led to corrupt practices.

=16. Comoros (CPI score: 26)
Corruption remained a serious problem in Comoros, it lacks rule of law. The nation gained independence from France in 1975. Since then it has witnessed around 20 coups or coup attempts.

=16. Uganda (CPI score: 26)
Even though the country has experienced high growth rates in recent years, corruption remains widespread at all levels.

=14. Guinea (CPI score: 25)
Rampant corruption in Guinea is hindering economic growth and increasing drug trafficking.

=14. Kenya (CPI score: 25)
Political corruption in the post-colonial government of Kenya has had a history which spans the era of the Jomo Kenyatta and Daniel arap Moi’s KANU governments to Mwai Kibaki’s PNU government. Experts estimate that an average urban Kenyan pays 16 bribes in a month.

13. Central African Republic (CPI score: 24)
Growth of Central African Republic is significantly hindered by wide spread corruption. Corruption is rife and undermines timber and diamond industries.

12. Republic of Congo (CPI score: 23)
In spite of its oil wealth, Republic of Congo is one of the most indebted nations in the world. This is largely due to rampant corruption.

=10. Chad (CPI score: 22)
Feud and corruption are blocking Chad’s economic growth. Revenue from oil is not spent responsibly. Corruption rules this nation.

=10. Democratic Republic of Congo (CPI score: 22)
As the nation emerges from a long period of violence and instability, it struggles with a legacy of entrenched corruption at all levels.

=9. Zimbabwe (CPI score: 21)
Corruption in Zimbabwe has become endemic within its political, private and civil sectors. In 2011, finance minister Tendai Biti claimed that at least $1 billion in diamond related revenue owed to the national treasury remains unaccounted for.

8. Burundi (CPI score: 20)
Despite the establishment of anti-corruption agencies, Burundi is remains a corrupt country in sub-Saharan Africa.

=6. Angola (CPI score: 19)
Corruption is a pervasive phenomenon in Angola. The current government is working on containing corruption by enacting laws and enforcing integrity systems.

=6. Guinea Bissau (CPI score: 19)
Guinea Bissau was once hailed as a potential model for African development. Today it is one of the poorest nations in the world. This is largely due to corruption among high-ranking officials.

=4. Eritrea (CPI score: 18)
People in Eritrea are living in a fear-ridden environment. Corruption and greed are rampant among the members of the ruling party.

=4. Libya (CPI score: 18)
Before the downfall of the Qadhafi regime in 2011, weak rule of law and systematic corruption had largely marginalized private sector activity in the nation. Corruption is the biggest problem facing Libya today.

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Former Nigeria’s head of state, late Sani Abacha stole $458 million and hid in bank accounts around the world, while thousands of Nigerians live in poverty.

3. South Sudan (CPI score: 15)

Since independence, South Sudan has taken steps to promote transparency and accountability in an endeavor to eliminate corruption. Unfortunately political will is lacking in effective implementation of anti-corruption policies.

2. Sudan (CPI score: 11)
Top ranking government officials are frequently involved in corrupt practices in Sudan. This has impacted the economic growth negatively. It is a huge challenge to do business in Sudan. Sectors like construction and transportation are prone to corruption.

1. Somalia (CPI score: cool
The Federal Republic of Somalia is located in the horn of Africa. Around 10 million people live in this country. It is the most corrupt nation in the world. There is lack of accountability in receipt and expenditure of public funds. Currently a parliamentary finance committee has been established to oversee all withdrawal transactions from the Central Bank, which is Somalia’s official monetary authority.

If the above-mentioned nations tackle corruption effectively, they will be able to enhance the standard of living of their people significantly.

Source: http://www.richestlifestyle.com/most-corrupt-countries-in-africa/

The Mysterious Sandwich Thief

Sandwich

 

In Europe and America, an innocent black man likely becomes a suspect because of the colour of his skin. At the premises of the industrial cleaning company, are workers from various countries, including Africans. For almost three months, the company we were working for, takes us to another industrial company in the district of Antwerp, called FABRICOM, to work there.

Fabricom is a construction company occupying a very large terrace. The company installs and maintains electricity installations, video surveillance, heating etc. Like the officials, the industrial workers also used containers as offices, toilets and dining hall.

The work at Fabricom was very heavy, thus; among hardworking operational staff, we do eight hours per day and most of the time, I drive a forklift. At 12 P.M, we have our lunch break. It was launch time we detected that some of the workers’ launch box had gone missing.

To work very hard and to find out that your lunch box is missing or stolen, is an issue too tough to handle. This didn’t happen once or twice but daily. Action speaks louder than words. Being Africans among white workers, all eyes were on us as the suspect, even though we weren’t accused of any theft.

At the dining hall, the atmosphere becomes tense, when on the fifth day of the week, one of the workers finds his food stolen again. This time, the management decides to do something about it. They secretly started their investigations, creating undetected hideout aiming to catch the person responsible for this theft red-handed.

The following week, about a quarter to noonday, a mysterious man emerged into the quiet dining hall, looking for a meal to steal. After tasting a number of meals, he finds a delicious one and he took it. As he tries to walk out he was intercepted.

Shockingly, out of over hundreds of workers at the company, the mysterious thief appeared to be one of our colleagues from Portugal. He was interrogated but the company didn’t call the police. Instead, they informed the boss of our company of what has happened.

Fabricom wouldn’t like to see the thief at the company’s premises again, so the company I was serving sent the Portuguese to another place to work. Sometimes it’s very hard to be judged wrongly because of the colour of your skin, but that shouldn’t prevent us to build a good relationship, with our neighbours, colleagues and our bosses.