The Next Africa: An Emerging Continent Becomes A Global Powerhouse

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The Next Africa will change the way people think about the continent. The old narrative of an Africa disconnected from the global economy, depicted by conflict or corruption, and heavily dependent on outside donors is fading. A wave of transformation driven by business, modernization, and a new cadre of remarkably talented Africans is thrusting the continent from the world’s margins to the global mainstream.

In the coming decades the magnitude of Africa’s markets and rising influence of its people will intersect with other key trends to shape a new era, one in which Africa’s progress finally overshadows its challenges, transforming an emerging continent into a global powerhouse. The Next Africa captures this story.

Authors Jake Bright and Aubrey Hruby pair their collective decades of Africa experience with several years of direct research and interviews. Packed with profiles; personal stories, research and analysis,The Next Africa is a paradigm-shifting guide to the events, trends, and people reshaping Africa’s relationship to the world.

Bright and Hruby detail the cross-cutting trends prompting Silicon Valley venture capital funds and firms like GE, IBM, and Proctor & Gamble to make major investments in African economies, while describing how Africans are stimulating Milan runways, Hollywood studios, and London pop charts.

The Next Africa introduces readers to the continent’s burgeoning technology movement, rising entrepreneurs, groundbreaking philanthropists, and cultural innovators making an impact in music, fashion, and film. Bright and Hruby also connect Africa’s transformation to its contemporary immigrant diaspora, illustrating how this increasingly affluent group will serve as the thread that pulls the continent’s success together.

Finally, The Next Africa suggests a fresh framework for global citizens, public policy-makers, and CEOs to approach Africa. It will no longer be “The Hopeless Continent”, nor will it become an overnight utopia. Bright and Hruby offer a more nuanced, net-sum, and data-rich approach to analyzing an increasingly complex continent, reconciling its continued challenges with rapid progress.

The Next Africa describes a future of a more globally-connected Africa where its leaders and citizens wield significant economic, cultural, and political power–a future in which Americans will be more likely to own African stocks, work for companies doing business in Africa, buy African hits from iTunes, see Nigerian actors win Oscars, and learn new African names connected to tech moguls and billionaires.

The Authors

 

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Authors Jake Bright and Aubrey Hruby pair their collective decades of Africa experience with several years of direct research and interviews. Packed with profiles; personal stories, research and analysis,The Next Africa is a paradigm-shifting guide to the events, trends, and people reshaping Africa’s relationship to the world.

http://www.amazon.com/Jake-Bright/e/B00QL084RY

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Shadow Of The Raven

Shadow 2Thunder claps roar and Odin’s ravens fly. Fearsome dragonships set sail – and the kingdoms of Western Europe hold their breath. Warriors of Thor are on the move. By the mid-ninth century, raids along Anglo-Saxon coasts by the pagan Danes have escalated, and as the raiders become bolder, attacks move deeper and deeper inland. Several bands even dare to overwinter on the coastal islands, particularly those at the mouth of the Thames, where the kingdoms of Wessex and Mercia border each other.

After three hundred years of bitter conflict over supremacy, the kings of these kingdoms are ready to put past enmity aside and take the first steps towards unity; steps they see as vital in the face of this newfound threat to their lands . . . Alfred of Wessex and Eadwulf of Mercia are the sons of kings, their roles in life already charted. But the turbulent events in their childhood years change the natural progression of things – and determine the characters of the men they will become.

Their roads to manhood follow vastly different routes: Eadwulf as a thrall in a pagan land; Alfred at his father’s court, and subsequently, those of his older brothers. But both learn crucial lessons along the way. Discovering that the enemy is not always a stranger is a harsh lesson indeed; the realisation that a trusted kinsman can turn traitor is the harshest lesson of all.

The story takes us from the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex to the Norse lands stretching north from Denmark to the Arctic Circle and east to the Baltic Sea. We glimpse the Court of Charles the Bald of West Francia and journey to the holy city of Rome. Through it all, the two boys move ever closer to their destinies.

The author

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Millie Thom is a former geography and history teacher with a degree in geology and a particular passion for the Anglo-Saxon and Viking period.

Originally from Lancashire she is a mother of six grown up children and now lives with her husband in a small village in Nottinghamshire, midway between the town of Newark and the lovely old city of Lincoln.

When not writing, Millie enjoys long walks and is a serious fossil hunter. She is also an avid traveller, swimmer and baker of cakes.

http://www.amazon.com/Millie-Thom/e/B00JZM1UIU

The Heart Has No Colour, No Country, No Religion, No Sex

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Andrea: Her wise comment inspired me to write this article.

I do write a lot, but I have to admit that some of my writings were created from comments of readers or my followers. As writers or bloggers, when we read comments on articles: How seriously do we take them, ponder over them to see their usefulness, significance and effect?

Many argue that it’s not good to make comment, but I say that It’s good to comment on articles, but if you don’t have anything significant to say, please shut your mouth, because your comment can give you the respect you deserve and the same comment can put you into a very big trouble, because of the bad things you said.

Believe me some comments worth more than silver and gold. It can change one’s life and the way you think, especially if you don’t have any love in your heart for someone. There are many problems and almost all these problems were caused by man. Pride, superiority and racism are some of the problems tearing our society apart today, yet no one wants to be called a racist.

Recently I posted an article captioned “Who Says There Is No Happiness Or Love In Africa?” The fact that Africa is a continent which has suffered a great deal of wars, ethnic conflicts, slavery and man-made diseases, many think they don’t have love for each other. Frankly speaking, a poor African can easily share his food with a friend, than a rich man in a developed country.

This particular article I wrote, didn’t generate much comment, but the only comment I had was awesome and inspiring. It touched my soul to read it over and over, allowing it to geminate in me, to add it to the little I have and share  with others.

According blogger Andrea, who runs this Italian blog: ‘Libera mente & Critica mente’:

Each person has a heart, and in each heart there is Love.

So everyone of us has Love in his/her heart.

The heart has no colour, no Country, no religion, no sex.

So Love has no colour, no Country, no religion, no sex.

Too many times, unfortunately, people forget to be human, and that have a heart…

https://liberamentecriticamente.wordpress.com/

I hope everyone agrees with me that this quotation or comment is awesome and carries wisdom? Thank you Andrea.

Where Is Clarence Williams III, After The Moud Sqaud?: The Influence of Television Films In Africa

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The Mod Squad, featuring Michael Cole, Clarence Williams III and Peggy Lipton, played a significant role in the entertainment scene in Ghana. 

It is often said that Africa is a continent plagued by war, conflict, poverty and diseases, but the discipline, endurance and the survival on that harsh continent, which have never been the pride of the foreign media, could have been very good education for the advanced world, including Europe and America, to stand stress, frustration and other life turmoils. 

Africans are tough, immune to suffering and can adapt to every situation than Africans in the Diaspora and Europeans. Apart from the influence of the Bible, the role of churches and gospel music, television has played a significant role in entertainment history in Africa. The national coverage of television films from Ghana Broadcasting Corporation helped transformed Ghana.

Ghana was one of the happiest African countries in the Sub-Saharan Africa and still remains a peaceful and God fearing country. That doesn’t mean there is no crime. I remember in the early seventies, foreign television film inspired the first kidnapping story in the crime history of Ghana. Three young men made names for themselves and became fugitives when they kidnapped a car dealer’s son for ransom.

The entertainment scene in Ghana during the 6O’s and 70’s was amazing. Apart from Bonanza, featuring the Family Cartwright, Department ‘S’ featuring Peter Wyngarde and Joel Fabiani, Roger Moore as ‘The Saint,’ David Janssen as Richard Kimble in the fugitive etc; ‘The Mod Squad’ a group of two handsome men,  Clarence Williams III and Michael Cole and a pretty lady called Peggy Lipton, made some groundbreaking advancements in Ghana’s entertainment.

I missed those wonderful golden years; thanks to the birth of technology, making it possible to view those wonderful old television series today. Some of the great film stars may have gone or still living, but the role they played in Ghana’s entertainment and Africa generally shall never be forgotten.

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Clarence Williams III today

One of my dreams is to see Europe and America media, lifting the image of Africa to educate Europeans and Americans on how Africans cope with all the hardships. Why many criticize about Africa’s weak educational system, yet teenage pregnancy, smoking and alcoholism are problems Britain and America are facing today? Why so much suicide in Europe and America than Africa? Because the life of Africans is much influenced by the gospel. Above all the entertainment scene from the sixties in Africa was a key to provide young children the experience, teaching, skills and the critical thinking to survive on that harsh continent.

Tragedy In South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War Of 2006

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Cathy Sultan combines vital history and vivid personal interviews to relate the lives of the oft-ignored civilians of southern Lebanon and northern Israel during the July war of 2006 and its aftermath. She documents how thousands of area residents have been victimized by the hawkish, shortsighted policy decisions of Israel, Lebanon and the United States. Throughout the book, these narratives of mothers, soldiers, activists and ambulance drivers on both sides are memorable for their detail, honesty and the deep sense of tragedy they relate.

Tragedy in South Lebanon also addresses the media treatment of the war, systematically dispelling common myths about the region perpetuated by government and main-stream sources. Sultan discusses how divisive factions within the current Lebanese government leave the country teetering on the brink of yet more violence, imploring government officials on all sides to act with foresight, compassion and responsibility. Features include a chronology of Lebanese history, maps depicting wartime activity and a glossary of Middle Eastern terms.

The Author

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I grew up in Washington D.C.. Quite rebellious as a young woman, I yearned to escape from my native city and experience great adventures. My  dreams came true when I fell in love with a handsome young Lebanese physician, eloped against my parents’ wishes after a short courtship, had two children and in 1969 moved to Beirut, Lebanon, a city called the “Switzerland of the Middle East” and famous for its hospitality, its lovely Mediterranean climate and its exotic blend of Arab and Western cultures.

For six years I led the life of my dreams. My home was a rooftop apartment with a terrace full of flowers and a breathtaking view of the city. I was accepted and loved as a Lebanese. My husband had a successful medical practice and my children were growing up speaking English, French and Arabic.

But in April 1975, my life was abruptly turned upside down. On a quiet Sunday afternoon, the Christian Phalange militia attacked a bus full of Palestinians in a neighborhood not far from mine in East Beirut. This singular incident set off an infamous civil war that eventually engulfed the whole city. My tranquil treelined street, a block off Damascus Road and two blocks from the National Museum, became a deadly territorial divide: the infamous Green Line, separating East from West Beirut. Despite the constant danger, my feelings for my lover-city were slow to change. Instead of fleeing, my love affair with Beirut clouded my otherwise clear judgement  and we stayed through the first eight years of Lebanon’s bloody civil war.

I spent my days caring for my family, racing under the bombs to rescue my children from school and comforting my physician husband who spent his days treating wounded civilians. I kept my sanity during the war in large part because I loved to cook. I entertained family and friends constantly, trying as much as possible to incorporate some normalcy into our lives. Little by little I acquired the coping skills necessary to resist and survive in the absurd dysfunction of war. Eventually, though, war took a huge toll on my family and in 1983 we abandoned our beloved Beirut and returned to the States.

It took a number of years for all of us to regain our sanity. And it wasn’t until when my son, by then a junior at Harvard, asked me to record our adventures in Beirut that I began to think about writing my story. What began as a project for my children quickly became my way to mourn the loss of my beloved Beirut. Another reason had to do with the attitude of people I met when my husband and I settled down in the mid-West. They seemingly could not relate to my war stories and quickly became disinterested. This painful experience was the impetus that stimulated me to write, to pour my heart out, to clease my soul of the traumas of war.  A Beirut Heart: One Woman’s War is a memoir of my fourteen years in Beirut.

In March 2002, two years into the 2nd Intifada, I traveled to Israel-Palestine to better understand the conflict. My book “Israeli and Palestinian Voices: A Dialogue with Both Sides” is part adventure, part history, part travelogue, all bound together with a startling collection of interviews which I conducted first-hand in a variety of sometimes not very safe places.This book is a continuation of the my quest to bring peace to a region tragically gripped by obduracy and fanaticism, a region of the world I care deeply about, a region that is too often mis-represented by biased media coverage.

My husband, Michel, and I live in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, a lovely rural community an hour and a half east of Minneapolis-St. Paul. Currently, I sit on the Executive Board of the National Peace Foundation where I oversee a variety of Middle East educational projects.

Book USA’s Best Books awarded A Beirut Heart: One Woman’s War Best Autobiography of 2006. Israeli and Palestinian Voices: A Dialogue with Both Sides won USA’s Best Books of 2006 award in the category of History/Politics and received Honorable Mention in the category of Political Science from the Midwest Independent Publishers Association in 2006.

My latest non-fiction book Tragedy in South Lebanon: The Israeli-Hezbollah War of 2006 is an account of the tragic 34 day war and its aftermath. It includes a chronology of Lebanese history, maps depicting wartime activity, a glossary of Lebanon’s political players, and, among others, interviews with both a Hezbollah fighter and an Israeli soldier, both of whom fought in the same battle.

Read about Cathy’s Latest Novel, The Syrian

 

One Man, One Wife

Aluko’s One Man, One Wife (1959), a satirical novel about the conflict of Christian and Yoruba ethics, relates the disillusionment of a village community with the tenets of missionary Christianity. A second novel, One Man, One Matchet (1964), humorously presents the clash of an inexperienced district officer with an unscrupulous politician. Kinsman and Foreman (1966)

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One Man, One Wife (1959), was equally shrewd in its depiction of village politics, pitting Christians against the authority of traditional chiefs. Other novels include Kinsman and Foreman (1966), about a civil servant’s struggles to resist the demands of his relations; Chief the Honourable Minister (1970), which deals with the problems of government at the top.

His Worshipped Majesty (1972), which focuses on the loss of political power by traditional chiefs; and Wrong Ones in the Dock (1982), which denounces certain aspects of the Nigerian legal system. Despite his exposure of political chicanery, Aluko, unlike many other prominent African novelists, such as Chinua Achebe and Ngugi wa Thiong’o, appears to be a champion of the post-independence élites in government and civil service.

The Author

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T. M. Aluko, Nigerian novelist, is significantly undervalued in comparison to many of his contemporaries in the so-called ‘first generation’ of Nigerian writers. Although he is concerned with such commonly treated themes as the impact of Western modernity on traditional Nigerian culture and the social and political failings of the postcolonial era, Aluko has approached his subjects with a comic detachment that is largely at odds with the more serious mood of most West African fiction. As a result he has been neglected and even dismissed by many critics.

Timothy Mofolorunso Aluko, a member of the Yoruba tribe, was born on 14 June 1918 in Ilesha, western Nigeria. He received a colonial education, attending primary school in Ilesha, at Government College Ibadan and Yaba Higher College near Lagos. From 1942 to 1946 Aluko worked as a junior engineer in the Public Works departments of Lagos and Ilorin.

During this period he also began to earn recognition for his short stories, the first of which, ‘The New Engineer’, appeared in the anthology African New Writing (1947), edited by T. Cullen Young. Travelling to England in 1946, he resumed his studies at King’s College, London, where he graduated in civil engineering and town planning in 1950.

Alongside his academic work, Aluko also became a regular contributor to the Liverpool-based West African Review. It was in that journal that he published his prescient essay, ‘Case for Fiction’, in which he argues the need for literature that is written by Africans, about African subjects, and for an African readership; in it he also outlines the various dilemmas and impediments faced by African writers of that time.

In 1950 Aluko returned to Nigeria to become a senior public-works engineer, working in various different cities. Also that year he married Janet Adebisi Fajemisin, with whom he had six children.

http://www.amazon.com/One-Wife-African-Writers-Series/dp/0435900307