Hitler’s Black Victims: The Historical Experiences of European Blacks, Africans and African-Americans During the Nazi Era

 

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Drawing on interviews with the black survivors of Nazi concentration camps and archival research in North America, Europe, and Africa, this book documents and analyzes the meaning of Nazism’s racial policies towards people of African descent, specifically those born in Germany, England, France, the United States, and Africa, and the impact of that legacy on contemporary race relations in Germany, and more generally, in Europe. The book also specifically addresses the concerns of those surviving Afro-Germans who were victims of Nazism but have not generally been included in or benefited from the compensation agreements that have been developed in recent years.

The Author

D09_347_SIS_Faculty_Staff nfs Clarence Lusane, SIS, faculty

Dr. Clarence Lusane is a full Professor of Political Science and International Relations, and the former Program Director for Comparative and Regional Studies in the School of International Service. He teaches courses in comparative race relations, modern social movements, comparative politics of the Americas and Europe and jazz and international relations.

He is an author, activist, and scholar, and a well-respected expert in the areas of human rights, global race relations, U.S. elections and politics, and international relations. He has lectured on these topics in over 60 countries including China, Colombia, Cuba, England, France, Germany, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Japan, the Netherlands, Panama, S. Korea, Switzerland, and Zimbabwe among others.

He is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles and eight books on human rights, U.S. and black politics, globalization, and European history. His latest book is The Black History of the White House. The book has been nominated for numerous awards and he has led to two presentations on the book at the White House. Among his other books are Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice: Foreign Policy, Race, and the New American Century; and Hitler’s Black Victims:

The Experiences of Afro-Germans, Africans, Afro-Europeans and African Americans During the Nazi Era. Dr. Lusane is currently conducting research on the intersection of jazz and international relations; global economic factors affecting African Americans employment; and the impact of President Obama’s campaign and election on global discourses on race and identity.

He is a former co-Chair of the U.S. Civil Society Committee of the U.S.-Brazil Joint Action Plan for the Elimination of Racism and was a longstanding board member of the Institute for Policy Studies. Currently, he is Co-Chair of the TransAfrica Forum Scholars Council. He is also a Commissioner on the District of Columbia’s Commission on African American Affairs.

http://www.amazon.com/Clarence-Lusane/e/B001HPQK4M/

The United States Of America: Land That Supported Hitler’s Evil And Criminals

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The shocking story of how America became one of the world’s safest postwar havens for Nazis

Thousands of Nazis — from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich — came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war “refugees,” their pasts easily disguised and their war crimes soon forgotten. But some had help and protection from the U.S. government. The CIA, the FBI, and the military all put Hitler’s minions to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers, whitewashing their histories.

For the first time, once-secret government records and interviews tell the full story not only of the Nazi scientists brought to America, but of the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as ordinary citizens. Only years after their arrival did private sleuths and government prosecutors begin trying to identify the hidden Nazis. But even then, American intelligence agencies secretly worked to protect a number of their prized spies from exposure. Today, a few Nazis still remain on our soil.

Investigative reporter Eric Lichtblau, relying on a trove of newly discovered documents and scores of interviews with participants in this little-known chapter of postwar history, tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler’s men.

The Author 

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Just months after September 11, the Bush Administration, without court-approved documents, secretly authorized the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on Americans and others inside the US to search for terrorist activity. Eric Lichtblau‘s eye-opening reports have helped the public to make sense of this post-9/11 story that questions the reach of presidential powers, and how the government balances homeland security against the civil rights of Americans.

For his work on the domestic spying scandal, Lichtblau is the recipient of a Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting and is also this year’s recipient, with Times reporter James Risen, of the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. The Pulitzer jury applauded them “for their carefully sourced stories on secret domestic eavesdropping that stirred a national debate on the boundary line between fighting terrorism and protecting civil liberty.”

Lichtblau has recently uncovered more government monitoring activities. The Swift story, in which counter-terrorism officials accessed the banking transactions of thousands of Americans from an international database, has alarmed many. The government’s departure from typical practice in how they acquire large amounts of sensitive financial data has stirred concerns about legal and privacy issues.

Eric Lichtblau covers federal law enforcement and national security issues for the Washington bureau of The New York Times. Before coming to the Times, he worked for the The Los Angeles Times for 15 years in both California and Washington, focusing on investigative reporting, legal affairs and law enforcement. He is currently working on a book on the remaking of federal law enforcement since 9/11.

Lichtblau is also a guest commentator on television, appearing frequently on CNN, CNBC’s Hardball, PBS’s NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, and C-SPAN’s Washington Journal. He also appears regularly on NPR’s All Things Considered. Lichtblau has given speeches for Cornell University, Syracuse University, Mensa, judicial and academic conferences, and other forums.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdK0LswGWGs

http://www.amazon.com/Nazis-Next-Door-America-Hitlers/dp/0547669194/

Ravensbruk: Horrific Hidden Atrocity In Nazi Concentration Camp Built For Women

A masterly and moving account of the most horrific hidden atrocity of World War II: Ravensbrück, the only Nazi concentration camp built for women

On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 867 women—housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes—was marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded in through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards.

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Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Holocaust. By the end of the war 130,000 women from more than twenty different European countries had been imprisoned there; among the prominent names were Geneviève de Gaulle, General de Gaulle’s niece, and Gemma La Guardia Gluck, sister of the wartime mayor of New York.

Only a small number of these women were Jewish; Ravensbrück was largely a place for the Nazis to eliminate other inferior beings—social outcasts, Gypsies, political enemies, foreign resisters, the sick, the disabled, and the “mad.” Over six years the prisoners endured beatings, torture, slave labor, starvation, and random execution. In the final months of the war, Ravensbrück became an extermination camp. Estimates of the final death toll by April 1945 have ranged from 30,000 to 90,000.

The Author

Sarah Helm (Writer)

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For decades the story of Ravensbrück was hidden behind the Iron Curtain, and today it is still little known. Using testimony unearthed since the end of the Cold War and interviews with survivors who have never talked before, Sarah Helm has ventured into the heart of the camp, demonstrating for the reader in riveting detail how easily and quickly the unthinkable horror evolved.

Far more than a catalog of atrocities, however, Ravensbrück is also a compelling account of what one survivor called “the heroism, superhuman tenacity, and exceptional willpower to survive.” For every prisoner whose strength failed, another found the will to resist through acts of self-sacrifice and friendship, as well as sabotage, protest, and escape.

While the core of this book is told from inside the camp, the story also sheds new light on the evolution of the wider genocide, the impotence of the world to respond, and Himmler’s final attempt to seek a separate peace with the Allies using the women of Ravensbrück as a bargaining chip. Chilling, inspiring, and deeply unsettling, Ravensbrück is a groundbreaking work of historical investigation. With rare clarity, it reminds us of the capacity of humankind both for bestial cruelty and for courage against all odds.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sarah-Helm/e/B001IXU67U/ref