You’ve Got The Power To Liberate Yourself From Depression

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Suicide is not a solution to free yourself from the world’s problems

Everyone has wonderful hopes, dreams, and expectations of their future, but many times what we are looking for never come our way. Some of us have been robbed of our joy through the loss of a loved one and many feel lonely and hopeless when they find themselves in abusive homes and domestic violence.

In such a troubled world, it’s very easy to see the ailments of the society taking its toll on people. The high rate of unemployment and divorce, are also some of the causes leading to depression. It’s not surprised that psychologists have confirmed that the ailments of people can be traced from the homes and environment they were raised.

We understand that as human beings, we are bound to face difficulties in our lives, the important question is: How do we handle those problems we experience? According to World Federation for Mental Health, depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease and affects people in all communities across the world.

Today, depression is estimated to affect 350 million people. The World Mental Health Survey conducted in 17 countries found that on average about 1 in 20 people reported having an episode of depression. But do you know that you have the power to overcome loneliness and depression?

Why some people easily succumbed to depression and others able to resist? The happy people we often meet on the street are not super humans. They are only happy because experience in life has taught them that happiness is yourself. Someone can make you unhappy, prevent your success, or do everything to hurt you, but so long as you are a living being, you have the power, desire, inspiration or everything it takes to liberate yourself from that misery, loneliness or depression.

Fear, anxiety, depression and loneliness can easily be prevented than you know. Instead of living on drugs and alcohol, which rather increase your psychological problems, there are some recommended steps which can keep one far from loneliness and depression. Reading interesting books as a hobby can capture your imagination to avoid depression.

If you love to stay at home, please cultivate the habit of taking a walk through the gardens, doing window shopping, joining social clubs. Going to the gym to exercise once or twice a week doesn’t only keep you fit but also psychologically healthy. You may have a hidden talent but you don’t know. Find out what you are very good at, follow it and start blogging to create your happiness.

Another important factor is financial matters, which often wear people down psychologically. When facing financial problems, you need a healthy mind to find your way out not a depressed mind.  I can’t do it, I’m not sure I can succeed, there is nothing left for me in life, are all ‘symptoms’ of depression. Take away the shackle off your body and free mind from the psychological chain damaging your health.

POSITIVELY FALSE: Exposing The Myths Around HIV And AIDS

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A Book by Joan Shenton

In the 30 years since ‘HIV’ was announced as the “probable cause” of AIDS we are no closer to a vaccine or cure. Scientists and clinicians who question the widely held belief that ‘HIV’ is the cause of AIDS hold fast to their position that multiple factors can be attributed to the illnesses defined as AIDS which continue to afflict specific communities and risk groups, and that billions of dollars and millions of lives have been wasted over a retrovirus that is either harmless or may not even exist.

This 16th Anniversary Edition of Positively False: Exposing the Myths around HIV and AIDS from award-winning tele-journalist Joan Shenton features the original late 1998 text with updates and contributions from 20 journalists, writers, scientists and clinicians who present critical arguments challenging the current scientific orthodoxy. They include: Henry H. Bauer, Christian Fiala, Neville Hodgkinson, David Crowe, Celia Farber, John Lauritsen and David Rasnick.

Also features the script of the 2014 documentary Positive Hell and renowned molecular biologist and pioneering critic Peter Duesberg et al.’s withdrawn 2009 paper for Medical Hypotheses.

“A gripping, timely, story of investigative journalism with analysis of the flaws in HIV/AIDS theory: that would still be an accurate description of this book, some fifteen years after it was first published.”

Henry H. Bauer, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Science Studies, and Emeritus Dean of Arts and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech).

The Author

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Joan Shenton is an independent tele-journalist whose documentaries include Positively False – Birth of a heresy (which was based on the original edition book of Positively False: Exposing the Myths around HIV and AIDS) and Positive Hell.

She has also produced documentaries on a variety of health issues for mainstream British television, earning Royal Television Society Journalism and British Medical Association awards.

She currently runs the Immunity Resource Foundation (IRF) which catalogues and disseminates alternative ideas on AIDS.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00QE80HNW

http://www.positivelyfalsebook.com/#lightbox/1/

POVERTY AND CORRUPTION IN AFRICA

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Image of poverty in Africa amidst all the rich mineral resources

Original article published in ti-logo

WHAT’S AT STAKE?

Around 80 per cent of African people live on less than US$2 a day. Corruption is one factor perpetuating poverty. Poverty and corruption combine to force people to make impossible choices like “Do I buy food for my family today or do I pay a bribe to get treated at the clinic?” Poor people often have low access to education and can remain uninformed about their rights, leaving them more easily exploited and excluded. In order to fight against their social exclusion and marginalisation, poor citizens need a space for dialogue with the authorities.

WHAT WE’RE DOING ABOUT IT

To escape the vicious cycle corruption creates for disadvantaged groups, people need to be able to speak up for their rights and demand accountability from their leaders, ensuring access to basic social services and resources. If the social compact between the government and the people fails, citizens – and especially the poor – are forced to compromise on the quality of their livelihoods and their social and human rights.

Our Poverty and Corruption in Africa (PCA) programme enabled disadvantaged people to take part in development processes by opening dialogue between them and their governments. From video advocacy to pacts binding officials and communities to agreed development targets, every activity was tailored to the national and local context.

Communities focused on their most pressing issues – such as agricultural support, water supplies or free medicines, all underpinned by the common principles of community participation. With its universal principles and adaptable methods, the programme’s approach is applicable in communities far beyond its scope.

If people have a say in how they’re governed (participatory governance) and officials are accountable to the people they serve (social accountability), poor people become aware of their power and the force their voices have when raised. Participatory social accountability tools increase contact between citizens and governments, and therefore increase transparency, accountability and good governance. They reduce the opportunities for people in authority to abuse their power.

Increased citizen participation means better informed communities, more public oversight and less corruption in planning and monitoring local development. This creates a win-win situation: the poor benefit from local development, and people in power benefit from being considered champions of integrity, all while the community prospers.

WHO’S INVOLVED

The PCA programme ran in six different countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Six of our national chapters participated:

These chapters used different social accountability tools they developed to engage poor people and their governments in constructive dialogue. Starting on a small scale at the local level, their experiences show how the community participation they initiated gains momentum and ripples outwards, increasing the citizen-government interface further.

OUR APPROACH

In order to increase the voice the people have in shaping and monitoring service delivery, our chapter inLiberia set up poverty forums. These brought together authorities, service providers and communities for open discussions. These forums helped fill the information gap across a wide range of subjects, giving the people the confidence to contribute to decision-making and demand accountability from officials. Local officials now act with more transparency and integrity, unwilling to incur people’s criticism or loss of confidence.

Our chapter in Mozambique worked with community radio and activists to hold officials accountable for the quality of service delivery, by overseeing development budgets and planning. The community activists gathered information about irregularities in services and presented their complaints to local and provincial authorities. The process was reinforced by community radio programmes on fighting corruption, to inspire communities to demand accountability.

In Sierra Leone and Ghana, our chapters established monitoring groups to hold officials accountable. The committees monitor specific sectors such as health, education and agriculture. Members report their findings at quarterly meetings with public officials, where they agree on improvements needed. Monitoring team members then ensure these adjustments take place.

Using participatory video, the problems facing the communities are highlighted, and progress – or the absence thereof – can be recorded. Because making a video is easy and accessible, it is a highly effective tool to engage and mobilise marginalised people and to help them drive their own forms of sustainable development based on local needs. With community action at its heart, this approach opened dialogue between communities and the authorities.

Development pacts were used by our chapters in Uganda and Zambia as a way to hold officials accountable for public service delivery. These pacts act as a social contract, committing communities and officials to an agreed development priority. In Uganda, this meant transparent delivery of agricultural services, whereas in Zambia, the development pacts helped complete a bridge over a river that cuts a community off every rainy season. By opening projects to public scrutiny, in non-confrontational way, the pacts reduced opportunities for corruption, thus helping community members achieve their development targets

http://www.transparency.org/whatwedo/activity/poverty_and_corruption_in_africa

The Persistent Threat Of Ebola In West Africa: An Open Letter To President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Of Liberia

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The helpless President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf: Is she scared to tell the American government of the medical crime committed in her country against Liberian citizens?

By Johan Van Dongen (Dutch Scientist & Micro-Surgeon)

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared on Saturday, July 31, 2015, that Liberia’s devastating 14-month Ebola outbreak, which killed more than 4,700 people, is over in the West African country.

The WHO declares: “It has been 42 days since the last confirmed Ebola victim in Liberia was buried. That is twice the 21-day incubation period for the disease to emerge in an infected individual. A national ceremony is planned for Monday.”

But why do outbreaks persist in neighboring Guinea and Sierra Leone? And why did WHO cautioned that this reality creates: “A high risk that infected people may cross into Liberia over the region’s exceptionally porous borders?”

This is very strange because we know by now that the Ebola virus which was discovered in Liberia is totally different from the one which caused the previous outbreaks in Sierra Leone and Guinea! And when they cross the borders they only could insert the contaminated virus with that specific virus and not the newly appeared virus which contaminated the 17-year-old boy!

So, if anyone thinks the Ebola outbreak in Mano River Basin is something that is a trifle, please let me confidently state to you that the ongoing disaster is far from being something to put on back-burner. This is the time for all residents in the badly affected Ebola  countries to unite to fight those who developed the man-made viruses!

World Health Organisation spokesperson, Tarik Jasarevic has now officially informed journalists on what many had suspected was the fearful realization that the new outbreak of Ebola in Liberia, with an index case of a 17 years old schoolboy, was not really ‘new’ after all. The outbreak never really ended in Liberia, something the World Health Organization knew that all along.

“We’re proud of what we collectively managed to do but we need to remain vigilant,” said Peter Jan Graaff, the United Nations Secretary-General, acting as a special representative and head of the U.N. Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER). The virus is not yet out of the region and as long as the virus is in the region all of us are still potentially at risk.”

On Saturday, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, toured health centers in Monrovia, embracing and taking group photos with health workers. She was accompanied by U.S. Ambassador Deborah Malac, the Associated Press reported.

But President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, how long do you want to wait?  Is it not about time to open your eyes and stop embracing WHO and other political, military and medical celebrities, who knew and know that the Ebola and Aids viruses were developed in the bio-medical warfare scene before, during and after the Second World War?

Is quietness not a form of stupidity, when many African leaders, including you, do not recognize the real scientific described origin of Aids and Ebola? Are your citizens not more important than power and money? Are you not aware of the fear and uncertainty you’ve placed your citizens into? What about the future, families, communities, your country, and its economy?

How long will you continue to believe in liars and people like Peter Jan Graaff from the WHO, who declared that Liberians are Ebola free? And when he stated that the transition to Ebola-free status was a “monumental achievement,” then President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf , you must read my book “Aids and Ebola the greatest crime in medical history against mankind,” and articles on the blog of the Ghanaian investigative journalist, author, and writer Joel Savage.

Yes! President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, you must do that, because the complete scientifically development of Aids and Ebola viruses are well explained in the book, to bring out the truth and stop the Africans claiming Aids and Ebola are curses from God. Africans don’t deserve any punishment or curse from God, than those who developed the viruses and planted in Africa.

Tolbert Nyenswah

Tolbert Nyenswah, who led Liberia’s much-criticized response to the disease, said late Thursday that finally ridding the country of Ebola was vindication for leadership that had taken such a beating during the darkest hours of the epidemic when critics complained about slow steps taken to halt the spread of the deadly virus. “Today, the same people (critics) are using us as a success story,” Nyenswah said.

In Washington, the White House on Saturday congratulated Liberia on the achievement, but cautioned that: “(we) must not let down our guard until the entire region reaches and stays at zero Ebola cases.” That statement alone confirms Liberia is still not free from Ebola.

The U.S. military, which was quick to respond to the crisis, built 11 clinics across Liberia, many by contract and trained 1,500 health workers. Yet by the time the work was completed in late December, the disease was on the decline. Last month, The New York Times reported that only 28 Ebola patients were treated at clinics built by the U.S. military, but President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf,  they only treated 28 patients for the record, and to ask why does Liberia need thousand soldiers to take care of only 28 patients in the neighbourhood of diamond and gold mines?

Peter Jan Graaff from the WHO

The WHO spokesman Peter Jan Graaff has now confirmed that: “Genetic studies of the virus in the ‘latest’ outbreak in Liberia is identical to the one that used to kill in Liberia few months back and which is the same virus that continues to kill in both Sierra Leone and Guinea.” But that is a lie President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf!

Because none, (I repeat, NONE) of the Liberians now with new Ebola infection in Liberia ever traveled to Sierra Leone or Guinea. It means the virus has been right inside Liberia quietly all this time. Whether new or old virus, they were all genetically engineered in laboratories.

Conclusions

The WHO Spokesman is now saying the infection of the 17 years old boy was likely acquired from a ‘non-identified transmission within the community’ or from a survivor still carrying the infection in other body fluids long after the blood tested negative for the virus. But there is also another possibility, so fearful to contemplate that the virus has now modified itself so much, genetically engineered by men of course, so that it can delay the onset of symptoms in those it infected.

What do I mean by ‘delay the onset of symptoms?’ Let me explain. Viruses can exist for stated periods in humans before they start manifesting sickness in the infected human. For example, the HIV virus can exist for years in a person before it causes the manifestation of clinical signs of HIV-AIDS.

Now, prior to this Outbreak, Ebola was known to manifest symptoms within 2 to 21 days of infection. This particular MRU outbreak had an average of 9 days between infection and symptoms. So, if it is now suspected to be scenario for ‘new index case’ of a teenage boy in Liberia, this MRU Ebola virus is now with the ability to exist for more than 21 days in a human before it manifests symptoms of Ebola sickness, then I can easily say we have a major situation on our hands in the MRU basin, to say the words from Tolbert Nyenswah.

Add to this, if the huge number of survivors living in MRU basin are possible carriers of the dreadful Ebola virus in body fluids like male semen or in the placenta of the foetus in wombs, we might have a serious nightmare unfolding in the Mano River Union basin also in the future.

http://www.amazon.com/AIDS-AND-EBOLA-Greatest-Medical-ebook/dp/B00QZCYMSS

Information And Communications Technology: The Key To Africa’s Development And Business Growth?

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Gone are the days when due to lack of modern technology, global businesses encounter impediments, today Internet Global System of Mobile Telecommunication and Satellite  Communication Technologies impact on Africa is enormous, not only in business, but  improving  health of individuals, education and communities.

There is no doubt that Africa is gradually making good use of the fresh demonstration of modern technology and rubbing shoulders with the advanced world. The internet and mobile phones are transforming the development landscape in Africa, making business smooth to run, profitable, easy communication and enhancing the health, educational and economic sectors.

The breakthrough of ICT facilities can’t be denied. The internet has brought commercial success to businesses operated on large and medium scale. The best of it all is reducing labour needed to achieve the same amount of work and above all paving the way for many to engage in education as highly trained ICT specialists.

The ICT is providing economic opportunities to both urban and rural area, playing a significant role in poverty alleviation. In recent years information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been deployed in numerous initiatives in rural communities in developing countries, bringing much developments to both the health and educational sectors. Everyone is trying to establish small scale business or go to school.

The success of ICT facilities in business, education, banking and health developments, can be seen in almost every African country, including Malawi, Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. It has been acknowledged by international entrepreneurs that development of Information and Communication Technology are playing crucial role in Africa’s development in the economic, health and educational sectors.

Not everything glitters is gold. Africa is struggling in development. According to the World Bank, 2.8 billion people live on less than US$2 per day, and 1.2 billion or one-fifth of the world’s population live on less than US$1 per day. That means many are still trapped in poverty, been deprived of access to essential assets and opportunities such as education, healthcare and employment, but there is hope that Africa will gradually crawl out of poverty as technology advances and business flourishes.

Child Soldiers: Children Who Don’t Know What Classroom And Education Are

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Young boys are often lured by some African leaders to fight for ‘freedom’

Third World Countries are plagued by crisis. Among the most critical is poverty, which has taken hundreds of children out of the classroom. Children are the world’s greatest resource, future leaders, and assets to national development, thus; it is, therefore the right of every child to be educated; unfortunately, worldwide many children aren’t aware of what education is, instead serving as slaves under child labour and serving as child soldiers in fields and wars.

As a child growing up in Africa, I find myself in an environment witnessing how many parents struggle to educate their children. Every weekend, I go hawking as a trader with banana, eggs, and bread, just to make some extra money to help my parents to keep me in the classroom. In the early hours of the morning a friend of mine sells newspapers as a vendor, before coming to school at 8 A.M. Despite the global assistance and benefits from advanced countries, many children in poor countries have no access to education.

There are no words to describe the plight of children roaming the streets in Africa, Asia, and South America, due to poverty. In the rural areas, imagine a school without a roof, as children sit and learn under shady trees. Imagine a child who carries his table and chair to learn and after school carries them back home. The classrooms haven’t any tables and chairs thus; the parents struggling to educate their children must provide those tables and chairs, with difficulties sometimes of buying textbooks.

Poverty hasn’t only taken children out of school but has also brought misery, sickness and exposing them as prey to physical or sexual abuse, having a devastating impact on families and communities. Due to poverty parents engage children in child labor, in order to improve their chances of attaining basic necessities. Extreme poverty statistics in parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America has pushed many children there to become child laborers.

How the European Union is making a difference in Somalia

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, once told a Georgetown University student that he experienced racism as a young Asian-American growing up in Iowa, but that he learned the true meaning of his identity when he began working to end poverty in Haiti, one of the world’s poorest nations. The stride to end or alleviate poverty is a costly and long-term process; it has therefore become illusion than a reality and also loan was given to poor countries to fight poverty, often lands in the pocket of corrupt government officials. However, many foreign agencies, foundations and private associations are supporting and financing educational projects in Africa.

In Somalia, the European Union and its member states are collectively the largest donors in its educational development. The country has the weakest educational structure in the world and will not achieve any of the Millennium Development Goals on education by 2015. The European Union support focuses on creating primary and secondary education opportunities, vocational training and boosting employment.

The United Kingdom as part of the donors assisting Somalia launched Girls Education Challenge, worth £21.3 million to get girls into school and ensure that they receive the quality education and the new government-run program called Go2School  to give a free elementary school education, has been successful putting  at least 1 million children into the classroom.

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