Africa In The Hands Of China After Colonialism

Mugabe 3

Robert Mugabe shakes hands with Chinese president, Xi Jinping.  

Like the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, distinguishing the flames of communism, colonialism and Apartheid also faded after the Europeans lost its grip on Africa, when demanding of political independence swept through Africa colony in the fifties.

Even though Africa is much underestimated, the continent’s rich mineral resources always attract both developing and developed countries. China is now actively engaged in Africa, but under heavy criticism, because the West and America see them as opportunists interested in Africa’s resources.

Nearly 600 years ago, the first Chinese reached Africa during the Ming dynasty, a period of cultural restoration and expansion, on the coast of Kenya. The next significant arrival was in the early 1900s, when about 60,000 Chinese miners worked on goldfields in South Africa. Later, Chairman Mao Zedong sent tens of thousands of agricultural and construction workers to Africa to enhance ties with countries emerging from colonialism.

Africa, taken as a continent of ignorance, attract Europeans and Asians, because many believe that without enough education, Africa is a place one can easily sets up a business and be a boss. Weak economy, influenced by rampant corruption, has allowed African leaders quickly welcoming Chinese business entrepreneurs to Africa. The Chinese have taken over the construction works in Africa, employing hundreds of Chinese and African nationals, becoming the most aggressive investor-nation in Africa.

Although China is playing a significant role in the construction and engineering sectors in Africa, not everything that glitters is gold. Chinese companies are cutting into Africa’s profits. Most African companies are losing jobs to the Chinese companies, because a lot of the African leaders have confidence in them and also they offer lower construction prices. Nevertheless; trade between China and Africa reached a new high last year, totaling US$198.5 billion. It is estimated that about 1 million Chinese people are engaged to different sectors in Africa.

The strong presence of Chinese in Africa, has sparked controversy, as America and Europe continue to accuse them of flooding the market with inferior or cheap quality products. Due to the rate of poverty, Africans rely on affordably products. It seems they have found solution and satisfaction in Chinese products. To build a good relationship with African leaders China continues to support and giving loan to Africa to enhance its developments.

In Ghana, crackdown on illegal miners exploiting the gold industry, led to the deportation of thousands of Chinese nationals from the country. The Immigration authorities say more than 4,500 Chinese nationals were repatriated after a series of swoops on illegal goldmines; souring the relationship between the governments of Ghana and China.

Many Ghanaians and local residents aren’t happy over the action of the Ghanaian government. “They were the ones that provided the mining equipment, most of the Ghanaians left behind can’t continue their operations,” said one of the local residents, but many Ghanaians concerned about health and environmental hazards, lauded the government’s efforts to curb illegal mining.

The question is: Why years after colonialism Africa still depend on foreign aid, despite economic growth in many parts of the continent significantly outpacing the global average?’ How is the money spent and how can Africa progress without foreign aid? What is the significance of independence when Africa is still crawling like a baby learning how to move around?

Science and technology provide the transformation of every developing and developed country, in this way, Africa have to build expertise in these areas for the economy to take off, but since corruption has affected every infrastructure, the continent has a long way to go and will always lack behind in development.

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J.N.K. Savage:Tracing The Works Of A Great Journalist Behind Computer Age

SAV 6Journalist/Documentary film Producer and Director Justin N.K. Savage and wife Nancy-Elizabeth Savage (Nancy-Elizabeth Hudson) You looking at my mother and father.

Justin Nobleman Kodwo Savage was a professional journalist, documentary film producer and director, born at Cape Coast, in the central region of Ghana in 1932. While in active service, he passed away on January 29, 1976.

At Guinea Press, now ‘The Ghanaian Times’ during the Kwame Nkrumah era, Mr. Savage travelled extensively across the globe, whenever the president leaves the country to participate in world affairs.

At home, Ghanaians were able to receive first-hand information from Mr. Savage, over Nkrumah’s trip overseas, appearing in ‘The Evening News,’ newspaper dominated by party news, CPP, and adulation of Nkrumah.

At Guinea Press, Justin Savage had the opportunity to make further studies in journalism in London, England, but Nkrumah’s interest in communism took him off Ghana soil to many Eastern European countries including Poland, Czechoslovakia etc, and Russia.

In the sixties, the president of the then Czechoslovakia invited African journalists to his country. Justin Savage heads the African journalists from Ghana, but the Ghanaians presence stole the show, because of the native Kente cloth they put on. Kente exposes the rich tradition and culture of Ghana.

Justin Savage filed his press cuts and combined all his publications which appeared in the newspapers as a magazine, naming it “A Mixture Of Periodicals.” These publications later after his death, became my favourite book, assisting me to gain more writing skills when my interest increased to be a writer.

Darkness fell on Ghana when Nkrumah was overthrown-ed on February 24, 1966, in a coup organized by CIA and local collaborators. Chaos and curfews followed amidst jubilation and sadness. Mr. Savage served Guinea press a year more and he resigned.

He followed a course in technology at the Kumasi Science and Technology, where he studied film production. After his course, he entered into Ghana Broadcasting Corporation as ‘Advisor on film for television.’

He excelled in his profession and had promotions. It wasn’t long when Friedrich Ebert Foundation (West German Television Team) established a television project attached to the Broadcasting House in Ghana.

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung is a German political foundation named after Friedrich Ebert, Germany’s first democratically elected president. Headquartered in Bonn and Berlin, the foundation contributes to social democracy by means of:

Political education in order to reinforce its fundamental values, research and scientific analysis of central policy areas, various forms of public dialogue in order to pave the way for it, scholarship programs for students and Ph.D. candidates, development cooperation aimed at global justice and building bridges of international cooperation for worldwide democracy.

For efficient service and to be familiar with new developments in television production, Mr. Savage was at West German for an intensive course. He returned to the Broadcasting House and was appointed ‘Documentary Film Producer and Director.

At the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, he made a number of documentary films, especially during the exhibition of Ghana and other African products at both the first and second ‘Ghana International Trade Fair,’ in Accra.

Kodwo, the name his co-workers loved to call him, did a number of documentary films, including ‘Ghana At A Glance, Cocoa In Ghana, Backyard Industries and ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced in 1972. I had the opportunity to play a role in ‘Backyard Industries.’

I grew up to see some of his friends such as Mr. Kofi Badu, the Managing Director of Daily Graphic and Mr. Willie Donkor, the Editor of Weekly Spectator, still in the media. In the early nineties, January, I contacted one of my father’s friends called Mr. Ebo Biney, at the Broadcasting House, requesting if he could telecast one of my father’s film on January 29, for remembrance. It came as a shock to me when I learned that all my father’s films got burnt, following a fire which engulfed Ghana Broadcasting Corporation some time ago.

Since then I have been working very hard to see if I can find any of my father’s work online, despite far behind computer age or advanced modern technology. Like winning a lotto, I discovered two. The first is at the website of Len Pole, a Museum Consultant: “Advisor on a film for television, ‘Furnace in a Village’, produced by Kodwo Savage, Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.” – http://www.lenpole.com/I contacted the museum consultant after the discovery of my father’s work on his website. I was delighted when he told a few years ago ‘Furnace in a village’ was shown at Cannes Film Festival.

Then I had a new break through  when I discovered another work at: Selected Bibliography in Communication – jstor by Graham B. Kerr, under the topic- All African governments are committed to development and most wish to …Journalism Quarterly [forthcoming]. ….. SAVAGEJ.N.K. “Ghana Jugend begeistert.- . “Ghana inspires youth.”

The selected Bibliography in Communication is a book published by the Canadian Association of African Studies. Justin Savage writes:

“We must bridge the gap between leaders and masses, between government and people . . No government tells the people everything, but every government must reach the people so as to tell them what they should be told” – Julius Nyerere

Continue reading: https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/483601.pdf?

The search for my father’s work isn’t yet over. As time goes on when I discover something new, I will keep on updating this article. I hope readers will enjoy reading it and if any reader has any suggestion to improve it, you are always welcome.

The incredible story of this great writer neglected when he was a child is now available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Writer-Died-Joel-Savage-ebook/dp/B013L54A7O