Health Matters: Evaluation Of The Quality And Wonders Of Lotus Seed For The Health

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Lotus plant

Lotus seeds are obtained from the lotus flower. They are a versatile food and can be eaten raw or cooked. The dried lotus seeds can be popped like popcorn and eaten. The seeds are harvested in the months of August and September and are then dried under the sun. There are two types of lotus seeds, white and brown peel. The shells, membranes and bitter germ of the seed of the white lotus seeds are removed during harvest.

Brown lotus peels, which get their color from the ripened seed which attaches to the membrane, are cracked in order to remove the germ. Dried lotus seeds are sold widely in Asian markets. They are hardy and rough in texture and hence must be soaked in water overnight. They can be added to various dishes such as soups. Fresh lotus seeds are sold with the seed heads.
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Dried Lotus seed
They must be broken Nutritional Information and Properties of Lotus Seed to remove each seed and then eaten. The shell of the fresh seeds should be removed before eating. Crystallized lotus seeds are made by cooking the seeds in syrup and then drying them. One of the most common uses of lotus seeds is lotus seed paste which is used in Chinese pastries and in Japanese cakes and desserts.
Nutritional Information and Properties of Lotus Seed
Lotus seeds are a rich source of phosphorus, protein, potassium, and magnesium. They may also contain zinc and iron. The seeds contain low levels of sugar, sodium, cholesterol and saturated fat. One ounce of raw lotus seeds contains approximately 94.3 calories.
Health Benefits and Therapeutic Uses of Lotus Seed
Lotus seeds are popular for their nutritional benefits and healing properties. They are commonly used in Chinese medications and also in various recipes. Lotus seeds contain L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase, an enzyme with anti-aging properties. It is known to help in repairing damaged proteins. The seeds contain kaempferol, a flavonoid known for its anti-inflammatory properties. It is known to help in repairing aging gum tissue.
The astringent properties of lotus seeds make them beneficial for the kidneys. They help to regulate the energy levels of the body. Some studies indicate that lotus seeds may be used to treat various sexual conditions. Lotus seeds are used in Chinese medicine to relieve the problem of diarrhea. They are also used to improve the health of the spleen.
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Rich and healthy Chinese Lotus seed cuisine
Lotus seeds were used to treat people with sleeping disorders such as insomnia. They are also known to be effective in alleviating restlessness. This is due to the natural sedative and calming effects of the seeds. The center of the lotus seed is known to be beneficial for the heart due to its cooling properties. The bitterness of the seeds comes from isoquinoline alkaloids which are believed to induce a calming effect and are also anti-spasmodic in nature. They cause dilation of the blood vessels and thus help in controlling blood pressure levels.
Some medicinal researchers believe that lotus seeds help to strengthen the digestive process and relieve diarrhea. The seeds are sometimes combined with other herbs in order to treat urinary ailments such as prostatitis and reproductive diseases. However, it is advisable to consult a doctor before using any natural remedies such as lotus seeds.
Other Uses of Lotus Seed
Lotus seeds also contain a powerful anti-aging enzyme which researchers are now trying to add to various anti-aging products and cosmetics. The dried seed heads are sold for decorative purposes across the world. These seeds are commonly used in dried flower arranging.
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Delicious Chinese Lotus seed pastry.
Delicious meals that can be prepared by Lotus seed are Pork heart Lotus Soup, White Mushroom Lotus Soup and Lotus Seed and Longan porridge.
Medicinal use of Lotus seed
Lotus seeds are classified as astringents. It’s sweetness and neutral are good for the spleen, kidney, and heart. The sweet taste and nourishing qualities of the seed are responsible for the benefit to the spleen; this helps stop diarrhea associated with qi deficiency. The astringent quality helps prevent loss of kidney essence, so the seeds are used to treat weak sexual function in men and leukorrhea in women. The seed also has calming properties that alleviate restlessness, palpitations, and insomnia.

Under The Same Sky: From Starvation North Korea To Salvation In America

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A searing story of starvation and survival in North Korea, followed by a dramatic escape, rescue by activists and Christian missionaries, and success in the United States thanks to newfound faith and courage

Inside the hidden and mysterious world of North Korea, Joseph Kim lived a young boy’s normal life until he was five. Then disaster struck: the first wave of the Great Famine, a long, terrible ordeal that killed millions, including his father, and sent others, like his mother and only sister, on desperate escape routes into China. Alone on the streets, Joseph learned to beg and steal. He had nothing but a street-hardened survival instinct. Finally, in desperation, he too crossed a frozen river to escape to China.

There a kindly Christian woman took him in, kept him hidden from the authorities, and gave him hope. Soon, through an underground network of activists, he was spirited to the American consulate, and became one of just a handful of North Koreans to be brought to the U.S. as refugees. Joseph knew no English and had never been a good student. Yet the kindness of his foster family changed his life.

He turned a new leaf, became a dedicated student, mastered English, and made it to college, where he is now thriving thanks to his faith and inner strength. Under the Same Sky is an unforgettable story of suffering and redemption.

The Author

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Joseph Kim

Few can imagine what it is like to be homeless and starving as a child. Few can imagine life in the hermit kingdom of North Korea. However, refugee Joseph Kim knows both very well and he gives us a window into those worlds in his new memoir Under the Same Sky: From Starvation in North Korea to Salvation in America.

Kim became homeless during the great famine of the 1990s, which killed more than a million people including his father. After three years on the streets, he escaped to China where a network of activists connected him with the U.S. consulate. At 17 years old, Kim arrived in America as a refugee with no family and barely an education.

NPR’s Arun Rath spoke with Kim about his harrowing experience as a homeless kid on the streets of North Korea, and how he finally made it to America.

On his life before the famine

I was only 4 or 5 years old when the famine began so I can’t really remember much from before but what I can remember is that I was actually being able to play with my friends, everything was peaceful. I didn’t have to worry about when the next meal was gonna come or whether we are gonna have food or not.

On losing his family at 12 years old

So my mom actually ended up making a very difficult decision to sell my older sister to Chinese men. She came back to me in North Korea and she explained to me but I didn’t really understand at the time. But now I think about it and she did it so she could at least save her youngest child, which was me. After that my mom tried to go to China again to look for my sister and earn some money but she got caught so she was put in a prison facility.

On being homeless in North Korea

In order to survive as a homeless, probably one of the first things that you have to do is to give up your human dignity because if you try to keep yourself a human being and try to preserve your rights and right to be treated, you’re not going to be able to ask for food. I mean it’s really humiliating. You also have to cross the line where you have to stop worrying about or thinking about the morality. I was taught in school don’t steal it but if I don’t steal it, I can’t survive.

On escaping to China

I crossed where the river was frozen so I was able to run across the border. There was no security guard. [The] distance was not that long, maybe like 100 yards, but I feel like that was the fastest I ran in my life.

On being a refugee in America

Friends treat me as just a normal Korean-American student — although they know my stories, I think my friends allow me to be part of their group without labeling me as a North Korean defector. I feel definitely welcomed and accepted.

The African Dream: How A Million Migrants Are Building A New Empire In Africa

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Chinese immigrants of the recent past and unfolding twenty-first century are in search of the African dream. So explains indefatigable traveler Howard W. French, prize-winning investigative journalist and former New York Times bureau chief in Africa and China, in the definitive account of this seismic geopolitical development.

China’s burgeoning presence in Africa is already shaping, and reshaping, the future of millions of people. From Liberia to Senegal to Mozambique, in creaky trucks and by back roads, French introduces us to the characters who make up China’s dogged emigrant population: entrepreneurs single-handedly reshaping African infrastructure, and less-lucky migrants barely scraping by but still convinced of Africa’s opportunities.

French’s acute observations offer illuminating insight into the most pressing unknowns of modern Sino-African relations: Why China is making these cultural and economic incursions into the continent; what Africa’s role is in this equation; and what the ramifications for both parties and their people—and the watching world—will be in the foreseeable future.

The Author

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Howard W. French is an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where he has taught both journalism and photography since 2008.

For many years, he was a Senior Writer for The New York Times, where he spent most of a nearly 23 year career as a foreign correspondent, working in and traveling to over 100 countries on five continents.

Until July 2008, he was the chief of the newspaper’s Shanghai bureau. Prior to this assignment, he headed bureaus in Japan, West and Central Africa, Central America and the Caribbean. Mr. French’s work for the newspaper in both Africa and in China has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

He has won numerous other awards, including the Overseas Press Club award and the Grantham Prize. French speaks English, Chinese, Japanese, French, and Spanish.

From 1979 to 1986, he lived in West Africa, where he worked as a translator, taught English literature at the University of Ivory Coast, and lived as a freelance reporter for The Washington Post and other publications.

French is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa (Knopf 2004), which was named non-fiction book of the year by several newspapers. “Continent” won the 2005 American Library Association Black Caucus Award for Non-Fiction, and was a finalist for both the Lettre Ulysses Award for the Art of Reportage and for the Hurston-Wright Foundation’s non-fiction prize.

Disappearing Shanghai,” French’s documentary photography of the last remnants of Shanghai’s historic old neighborhoods has been featured in solo and group exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia, and reprinted in numerous magazines. Prints from Disappearing Shanghai have been acquired by the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in St. Louis, as part of its permanent collection, and shown in solo exhibition there.

Disappearing Shanghai” was published in book form by Homa and Sekey in August 2012. The work is a collaboration with the author, Qiu Xiaolong, a Shanghai native, who contributed original poetry.

French’s third book, China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants are Building a New Empire in Africa, was published by Knopf in May 2014. It was selected by The New York Times, The Economist and The Guardian as one of the most noteworthy books of the year. He is now at work on a new non-fiction book, also under contract with Knopf, about the history of Chinese power and the geopolitics of East Asia.

French contributes often to a variety of publications, including The Atlantic and The New York Review of Books, and occasionally reviews books for The Wall Street Journal. He is also a frequent public speaker.

French was a 2010-’11 fellow of the Open Society Foundations. He is also a board member of the Columbia Journalism Review, and he currently resides in New York City.

For more information, please contact Howard French at globetrotter@howardwfrench.com

Africans In China: A Sociocultural Study And Its Implications On Africa-China Relations

While there is much discussion on Africa-China relations, the focus tends to lean more on the Chinese presence in Africa than on the African presence in China. There are numerous studies on the former but, with the exception of a few articles on the presence of African traders and students in China, little is known of the latter, even though an increasing number of Africans are visiting and settling in China and forming migrant communities there.

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This is a phenomenon that has never happened before the turn of the century and has thus led to what is often termed Africa’s newest Diaspora. This book focuses on analyzing this new Diaspora, addressing the crucial question: What is it like to be an African in China? Africans in China is the first book-length study of the process of Africans travelling to China and forming communities there.

Based on innovative intermingling of qualitative and quantitative research methods involving prolonged interaction with approximately 800 Africans across six main Chinese cities–Guangzhou, Yiwu, Shanghai, Beijing, Hong Kong and Macau–sociolinguistic and sociocultural profiles are constructed to depict the everyday life of Africans in China.

The study provides insights into understanding issues such as why Africans go to China, what they do there, how they communicate with their Chinese hosts, what opportunities and problems they encounter in their China sojourn, and how they are received by the Chinese state. Beyond these methodological and empirical contributions, the book also makes a theoretical contribution by proposing a cross-cultural bridge theory of migrant-indigene relations, arguing that Africans in China act as sociopolitical, socioeconomic, and sociocultural bridges linking Africa to China.

This approach to the analysis of Diaspora communities has consequences for crosscultural and crosslinguistic studies in an era of globalization. Africans in China is an important book for African Studies, Asian Studies, Africa-China relations studies, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, international studies, and migration and Diaspora studies in an era of globalization.

The Author

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Adams Bodomo is Professor of African Studies at the University of Vienna, Austria. He founded and directed the African Studies Programme at the University of Hong Kong where he has taught for more than 15 years in various programmes such as Linguistics, Cognitive Science, and African Studies.
           His first book, The Structure of Dagaare (CSLI Press, Stanford University, 1997), is a pioneering work on the grammatical system of the Dagaare language, spoken in the Upper West region of Ghana where he was born. His other major works include Computer-mediated Communication for Linguistics and Literacy, one of the first books on the emergent field of computer-mediated communication, and Africans in China, a pioneering sociocultural study of the African presence in comtemporary China.
            In addition to books he has published in leading journals of Linguistics, African, Asian and Global Studies such as Linguistic Inquiry, Lingua, Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, African Studies, African Diaspora, China Quarterly, and China Review. He is on the editorial boards of several journals including Studies in African Linguistics, Internaional Journal of Web-based Learning and Teaching, and the Journal of African – American Studies.
             He has received several prestigious fellowships,such as the Stanford Humanities International Scholar Award and visiting professorships such as a professorship at the prestigious Bayreuth Graduate School of African Studies in Germany. Professor Bodomo loves distance running, hiking, or just relaxing at home or in a pub over an exciting game of soccer.